Course Descriptions

Term:

Fall Quarter (F19)

Dept/Description Course No., Title  Instructor

None Found

Courses Offered by the Religious Studies Minor or other Schools at UCI

Fall Quarter (F19)

Dept Course No., Title   Instructor
REL STD (F19)5B  WORLD RELIGIONS IITINSLEY, E.

An introduction to various religious traditions in selected areas of the world—including India and South Asia, East Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Same as HISTORY 16B. 

Core Religious Studies course - no category emphasis. 

Days: TU TH  03:30-04:50 PM

REL STD (F19)45A  CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY: THE GODSGIANNOPOULOU, Z.

Classics 45A

An overview of the main myths of the gods of the ancient Greeks and Romans and their influence in contemporary and later literature and art. Includes readings from both ancient and modern sources.

Category II - World Religious Traditions

REL STD (F19)100W  EUROPE & ISLAMCOLLER, I.

HSITORY 100W
Enrollment in History 100W will be restricted to History majors until the fee deadline on September 16, 2019.
Lower division writing is required. 

Stay tuned, course description coming soon!

REL STD (F19)122  ANCIENT INDIAPATEL, A.

Emphasis/Category: Thematic Approaches to Religion (Category 3)
ART HISTORY 155A

This course will examine the visual history of the region defined as ‘India’ today, but necessarily encompassing parts of modern Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, and eastern Afghanistan. After an introduction to the Indus Valley Civilization (2700-1500 BCE), we will explore the legacies of Alexander the Great's campaigns to the edges of India and their impact on the Buddhist art and architecture of the Indian subcontinent. We will also examine the inverse dispersal of Buddhist and Hindu iconographies both eastward and westward in Asia. The course will culminate with the supposed Golden Age of the Gupta empire and its far-reaching legacies from Iran to China. No prerequisite.

Category III - Thematic Approaches to Religion
Days: TU TH  12:30-01:50 PM

REL STD (F19)130F  JEWS AND POWERKOPSTEIN, J.

Examines the relationship between the Jewish people and political power over a 3500 year period. How have Jews preserved their communal interests and personal safety? How have they defined the proper relationship of the people to political authority.

Category III - Thematic Approaches to Religion 
Same as POLI SCI 154J and HISTORY 130F. 
Days: TU TH  12:30-01:50 PM

REL STD (F19)190  MOUNTAINS AND EAST ASIAN RELIGIONSTINSLEY, E.

E ASIAN 190

Mountains have long exerted a pull on the imagination and induced a sense of awe and mystery in those who view and explore them. In East Asia they have been considered the places of the dead as well as cast as the abodes of spirits and gods of all kinds. Too, as giant structures, they were considered close to the heavens. This is why many religious practices took (and take) place in the mountains, which sometimes took on the form of massive Buddhist mandalas, sometimes were considered paradises populated by Daoist immortals, and sometimes understood as the center of the cosmos. In this course we will consider the Buddhist, Daoist, Hindu, and Shinto views of mountains, and the religious practices and cultures they produced.

Category II - World Religious Traditions

ANTHRO (F19)139  ISLAM IN AMERICAHAMDY, S.

Category I (Judaism/Christianity/Islam) or III (Thematic Approaches to Religion)

This course is about the history of Islam and Muslims in the United States, with special attention to the role of slavery, extractive labor, migration, race, nationalism, citizenship, and the media. We will learn the core tenets of Islam and what wide varieties of Muslims believe and practice as they relate to institutions such as kinship, spirituality, and family life. We will pay attention to inequalities in the distributions of resources; to how particular cultural practices are depicted; and to how these intersect with race, class,
national background, gender, and sexual orientation.

ANTHRO (F19)149  ARCHAEOLOGY IN THE ISLAMIC WORLDSTRAUGHN, I.

Category III - Thematic Approaches to Religion

For nearly 1500 years Islamic culture has played a prominent role in the transformation of landscapes, cities, ideas and objects. This course uses the archaeological record from across the Middle East and beyond to explore those changes and what it can tell us about the various cultures and peoples (Muslim and non-Muslim alike) impacted by Islam.

INTL ST (F19)179  DEMOCRACY AND ISLAMPETROVIC, B.

Category I (Judaism/Christianity/Islam) or III (Thematic Approaches to Religion) 

This course aims to address the following questions: Are Islam and Democracy compatible? How is religious interest defined? How are Islamic images and institutions used? What is the historical relationship between Islam and politics? When and under what conditions is Islam publicized and politicized? Is Islam compatible with modernity? Is it possible to be modern and Muslim at the same time? How do Islamic scholars deal with the questions of "difference", democracy, and science? The major task of this course will be to assess how religion makes an impact on politics, state and society and in turn is impacted upon and potentially transformed by society, politics and the state.

(same as 71222 Soc Sci 189, Lec H)

INTL ST (F19)179  LATIN AMERICAN RELIGIONDUNCAN, R.

Category I - Judaism/Christianity/Islam

Religion has deeply influenced the course of Latin American society and
culture.  It has served not only as a source of individual identity, but
as a basis for a collective one as well.  This course will survey the
development of religious thought and practice over five centuries of
Latin American history.  Lectures will examine the clash of diverse
religious traditions beginning with the great “encounter” between
Europeans, indigenous peoples, and Africans in the New World.  An
analysis will follow of the fundamental—and sometimes controversial—role
of the Catholic Church in the region as well as non-Christian faiths. 
Themes will include indigenous religious practice, Christianization
efforts, the role of religion in politics and revolution, liberation
theology, Afro-Latin American faiths, Judaism, and the recent rise of
Pentecostal denominations.  Students are expected to attend lectures and
complete all assigned readings.  Videos and primary source materials
will supplement the lectures.

INTL ST (F19)179  ARAB UPRISINGSPETROVIC, B.

Category III - Thematic Approaches to Religion

In late 2010 and early 2011, a chain of popular uprisings shook North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The authoritarian rulers of regimes until recently thought stable were forced from power in Tunisia and Egypt. Other countries throughout the region experienced massive protests as well, resulting in diverse outcomes, ranging from timid reforms to restoration of authoritarian rule to civil wars. This course will explore the cultural, geopolitical, and socioeconomic forces that set the stage for the so-called Arab Spring. It will then examine the experience of democratization from Central and East Europe to Latin America, Asia and Africa to help inform our understanding of the challenges and opportunities facing contemporary movements in the Middle East.

(same as 67375 Pol Sci 149, Lec A;   and 71060 Soc Sci 189, Lec A)

SOCIOL (F19)56  RELIGION & SOCIETYMAZUMDAR, S.

A critical and personal examination of the varieties of religious and spiritual experiences human beings are undergoing in contemporary society. The role of conscious understanding and unconscious conditioning regarding religion and spirituality.

Category III - Thematic Approaches to Religion

SOCIOL (F19)136  ASIAN AMERICAN WOMEN & RELIGIONSKOH-PARSONS, S.

Category I - Judaism/Christianity/Islam

Stay tuned, course description coming soon! 

SAME AS ASIANAM 143.