Course Descriptions

Term:

Winter Quarter (W19)

Dept/Description Course No., Title  Instructor
ART HIS (W19)40B  EUROPE:MEDIEVL &RENMASSEY, L.
Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1)

AH 40B (Western Art of the Middle Ages and Renaissance) focuses on the long period that extends from the end of the Western Roman Empire in the fifth century through the sixteenth century. There are no prerequisites for the course and no expectations that students will necessarily have taken Art History 40A. Less a survey than a series of case studies, this course looks at colossal statues of emperors, miracle working icons, gem encrusted reliquaries, Gothic cathedrals, the eye-tricking illusions of Renaissance painters, the first nude statues in the West since antiquity, Michelangelo’s paintings in the Sistine Chapel, and Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa. In looking at these things, we will trace the emergence of European visual culture, its dialogue with other cultures, the questioning of the nature and validity of representation within that culture — especially the representation of the human body — and the gradual eclipse of the sacred icon by the secular, modern work of art during the Renaissance.
Days: MO WE  10:00-10:50 AM

E ASIAN (W19)150  LIT CHRIST IN S KORSUH, S.
Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1), World Religious Traditions (Category 2)

This course deals with a cultural moment during which literature, politics, and religion intersected in reaction to the oppressive rule of the South Korean state in the 1970s and 80s. Many literary works in 1970s and 80s South Korea implicitly and explicitly invoked the image of Jesus. Often, they offered thinly veiled social commentary on political and economic inequality and injustice resulting from rapid industrialization and urbanization under authoritarian rule. By paying especial attention to the recurring image of Jesus as rather an impotent and weak figure than the incarnation of omnipotent and omnipresent divinity in 1970s and 80s South Korean literary texts, the course explores what aspects of Christianity resonate with the concerns of writers and poets, and society in general under oppressive rule.

Cross-listed: (same as 64550 Intl St 179, Lec G)
Days: TU TH  02:00-03:20 PM

EURO ST (W19)101A  FAITH & REASONSMITH, J.
Emphasis/Category: Thematic Approaches to Religion (Category 3)

European Studies 101A
Winter 2019
Instructor: John H. Smith, Professor of German

FAITH AND REASON

Early Modern Europe was a time of tremendous upheavals that transformed the earlier medieval social structures and laid the foundation for our own world. Central to this period were challenges to traditional religious views (coming from conflicts within Europe but also from European encounters with other cultures) and the introduction of new modes of reasoning. Although these developments are often associated with a process of “secularization,” i.e., the gradual diminishment of the role of religion in public life and the substitution of non-religious ideas for religious ones, we will try to paint a more nuanced picture that sees faith and reason, the religious and the secular, in a complex dialogue (dialectic) with each other. The time period of the course material stretches from 1517 (Luther’s “95 Theses” unleash the Reformation) to 1789 (the French Revolution). We will cover developments in many parts of Europe and in many areas (arts, society, politics, culture).

Some of the major topics to be explored in the course from a variety of disciplines (literature, art, history, philosophy, political theory, sociology) are:

1. Debates concerning Humanism and the Reformation (Luther and Erasmus)
2. Interactions with the Ottoman Empire and Islam (Luther and Erasmus on the  “Turks” and the development of Renaissance art/perspective out of Arabic  influences)
3. New attempts to ground philosophy in reason (Descartes) and their relation to  faith (Pascal, Kant)
4.  The rise of new forms of rationality (scientific, economic/capitalist)
5. The role of the state in relation to religion (Hobbes, Spinoza)
6. Skeptical arguments for “natural theology” (Hume)
7. Enlightenment understandings of (religious) toleration (Nathan the Wise, a play  by the major German author Gotthold Ephraim Lessing)
8. The French Revolution, radical secularism (“laicism”), and the return of religion

All of these topics from the Early Modern period have immediate relevance for events unfolding in the world today.

We will focus on close readings of primary texts in a variety of genres, historical background of the period, and analytical writing. There will be an expectation of active class participation.

Days: TU TH  12:30-01:50 PM

FLM&MDA (W19)160  MUSLIM CINEMADAULATZAI, S.
Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1), Thematic Approaches to Religion (Category 3)

Using film and documentary, theory and criticism, this course will
explore the complex world of Muslim diasporas forged through the
overarching nexus of colonialism, slavery and empire.  In exploring the
captivating diversity of Muslims lives, this course will situate a range
of experiences within the rubrics of race, class, gender, sexuality and
nationhood.  With cinema and visual culture as our guide, our
exploration of Muslim diasporas will provide a platform with which to
interrogate a broad range of issues and debates, including the formation
of national identities, race and the colonial encounter, gender and
imperialism, aesthetics and power, and resistance and immigration.
Days: MO WE  10:30-11:50 AM

GLBLCLT (W19)169B  RELIGIONS OF SOUTHEAST ASIADOUGLAS, T.)
Emphasis/Category: World Religious Traditions (Category 2)

This class examines key religious elements, bit historical and contemporary, that have profoundly influenced Southeast Asian history, culture and the Southeast Asian diaspora. cla both a historical and cultural overview of various religions that have been practiced or are currently practiced in Southeast Asia. The class will look at various forms of animism (such as nat worship in Burma, shamanism among the Hmong and the Barong dance in Bali), forms of Hinduism/Brahminism (including kingly cult worship based on Saivism and Vaishnavism that was a major part of the region's past), Mahayana Buddhism, Theravada Buddhism, Islam, Catholicism and the many syncretic ways in which various religious traditions were often uniquely blended together in Southeast Asia.
Days:   12:00-12:00 AM

GLBLCLT (W19)179  LITERATURE CHRIST IN SOUTH KOREASUH, S
Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1), World Religious Traditions (Category 2)

Studies in selected areas of international studies. Topics addressed vary each quarter.
Days:   12:00-12:00 AM

GLBLCLT (W19)179  RELIGIONS OF SOUTHEAST ASIADOUGLAS, T
Emphasis/Category: World Religious Traditions (Category 2)

Studies in selected areas of international studies. Topics addressed vary each quarter.
Days:   12:00-12:00 AM

HISTORY (W19)100W  MEDIEVAL SAINTSMCLOUGHLIN, N.
Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1)

Saints, namely people deemed holy by their local communities or the wider church, influenced every aspect of medieval European life. Early Christian martyrs from the Roman Empire embodied the ideals and hopes of the growing Christian community and continued to inspire the conduct of medieval Europeans long after their death. Towns that housed shrines to important saints survived as centers of commerce even as the western European economy shrunk in the aftermath of the Roman Empire’s contraction. Stories of the virtues and miracles of saints circulated widely throughout Europe and were used to shape the behavior of kings and peasants alike. In this course we will examine the central role played by saints in late ancient and medieval Europe as a means of understanding how particular understandings of holiness reinforced and challenged political and social norms and also evolved over time. At the same time, we will be improving our skills as historians by learning how to read complicated primary sources, acquainting ourselves with historical arguments about a time and place that was vastly different from our own, and practicing our writing skills through in-class exercises and more formal papers. Students will have the opportunity to do a research project as their final exam if they chose to do so. This course fulfills the upper-division writing requirement for UCI and the historical writing requirement for the history major.

Prerequisite: HISTORY 12 or HISTORY 15A or HISTORY 15C or HISTORY 15D or HISTORY 16A or HISTORY 16B or HISTORY 16C or HISTORY 18A or HISTORY 21A or HISTORY 21B or HISTORY 21C or HISTORY 40A or HISTORY 40B or HISTORY 40C or HISTORY 60 or HISTORY 70A or HISTORY 70B or HISTORY 70C or HISTORY 70D or HISTORY 70E or HISTORY 70F. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: History Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

GE: (Ib)
Days: TU TH  09:30-10:50 AM

HISTORY (W19)12  HEBREW BIBLEGROSS, S.
Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1)

This course is an introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible, a collection or ancient library of fascinating texts produced by dramatically different groups in drastically different places and time periods. The texts in this collection are some of the world’s most enduring works of literature, ideology, theology, and more, and continue to shape our world, just as our world continues to shape how the texts are understood.
The goal of the course is to acquaint students with the central texts in the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and to situate these texts in their historical contexts. Secondary goals of the course include introducing students to the various theoretical and methodological frameworks scholars have used to better understand these text, and well as to introduce students to the reception of these texts by ancient Jews and Christians.

GE: (IV)
Days: TU TH  09:30-10:50 AM

HISTORY (W19)130C  ANCIENT JUDAISMGROSS, S.
Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1)

The period spanning from the final books of the Hebrew Bible to the coming of Muhammad was formative and momentous for Jews. This course will introduce students to the major political, social, and cultural developments in Jewish history, including the return of the exiled Israelites from Babylonia to Judea; the Maccabean revolt against the Seleucids and the rise of Jewish autonomy, the life and death of Jesus and movement(s) that formed around him; the destruction of the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem, the rise of the rabbis and the production of rabbinic literature; and much more.
Days: TU TH  02:00-03:20 PM

HISTORY (W19)135E  CHRISTIANITY & SCIENCERAPHAEL, R.
Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1), World Religious Traditions (Category 2)

This course addresses a central theme of the Western intellectual tradition, the desire to reconcile rational philosophy (science) with religious and biblical authority.  While most popular presentations of the relationship between science and religion rely on simplistic models of conflict (the secular nature of modern science and its repeated conflicts with religion) or cooperation/co-existence (science and religion each have clearly defined domains), we hope to explore a wider variety of relationships. Moving beyond claims of superiority or mutual isolation, we will consider the complicated negotiation of boundaries and proper authority between science and religion. We will focus on two defining moments in the history of science and Western Christianity: the condemnation of Galileo by the Catholic Church and the development and reception of Darwin's theory of evolution. Topics include transformations in conceptions of reason, science, biblical interpretation, and divine intervention.
Days: MO WE  10:00-10:50 AM

HISTORY (W19)180  HISTORY OF THE DEVILMCKENNA, J.
Emphasis/Category: Thematic Approaches to Religion (Category 3)

This course offers the history of an idea and a history of the effects of that idea. Students learn how numerous ancient mythological 'evil entities' in various world cultures contributed to the devil idea. Students then trace the development of devil traditions in ancient Zoroastrian, Jewish, Christian, and Islamic texts and contexts. Students then learn of the deadly effects of the devil idea: the devil idea fed centuries-long European anti-Jewish sentiment; it aided in the persecution and killing of European heretics; it was a major factor in a 300-year-long European satanic panic called the witchcraze, which executed some 100,000 'witches'. Next, students examine the uses of the devil in medieval European folklore and modern Western literature. Students then review a 1500-year history of devil iconography in Western art and a 100+ year history of the devil in Western films. Lastly, students survey the relation of the devil idea to very recent sociological phenomena like black metal music, satanism, satanic ritual abuse, and modern witchcraft. Along with lectures, there will be weekly readings (book chapters and/or handouts), weekly writing (short reviews of the reading), and weekly full-class discussions. Since the class meets once a week, any absence has a very ill effect on grades. One final exam (comprehensive). By the way: the class is not an examination of---or a promotion of---the occult.
Days: WE  03:00-05:50 PM

LIT_IN_TRANS (W19)150  E ASIAN 150 LIT CHRIST IN S KORSUH, S
Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1), World Religious Traditions (Category 2)

This course deals with a cultural moment during which literature, politics, and religion intersected in reaction to the oppressive rule of the South Korean state in the 1970s and 80s. Many literary works in 1970s and 80s South Korea implicitly and explicitly invoked the image of Jesus. Often, they offered thinly veiled social commentary on political and economic inequality and injustice resulting from rapid industrialization and urbanization under authoritarian rule. By paying especial attention to the recurring image of Jesus as rather an impotent and weak figure than the incarnation of omnipotent and omnipresent divinity in 1970s and 80s South Korean literary texts, the course explores what aspects of Christianity resonate with the concerns of writers and poets, and society in general under oppressive rule.
Days:   12:00-12:00 AM

PHILOS (W19)190  CHRISTNITY &SCIENCERAPHAEL, R.
Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1), Thematic Approaches to Religion (Category 3)

Visit the Logic and Philosophy of Science website for more information.
Days: MO WE  10:00-10:50 AM

Courses Offered by the Religious Studies Minor or other Schools at UCI

Winter Quarter (W19)

Dept Course No., Title   Instructor
REL STD (W19)5B  WORLD RELIGIONS IISTAFF

This course is an introduction to the major religions of Asia, through an exploration of the emergence and development of their beliefs and practices in historical-cultural context. We will be exploring Confucianism, Daoism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Shintoism by reading and discussing a combination of primary texts/materials from visual culture (including film), and secondary texts that analyze them. The course has a decidedly cultural slant, as reflected in our key text, Asian Religions: A Cultural Perspective (Randall L. Nadeau). It is hoped that students will come away with a good knowledge of religious practices in Asia, the skills to articulate that knowledge and their own views on it, and a deeper level of thought concerning religion itself.
Days: TU TH  03:30-04:50 PM

REL STD (W19)100  FAITH & REASONSMITH, J.

Emphasis/Category: Thematic Approaches to Religion (Category 3)
Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1)
Early Modern Europe was a time of tremendous upheavals that transformed the earlier medieval social structures and laid the foundation for our own world. Central to this period were challenges to traditional religious views (coming from conflicts within Europe but also from European encounters with other cultures) and the introduction of new modes of reasoning. Although these developments are often associated with a process of “secularization,” i.e., the gradual diminishment of the role of religion in public life and the substitution of non-religious ideas for religious ones, we will try to paint a more nuanced picture that sees faith and reason, the religious and the secular, in a complex dialogue (dialectic) with each other. The time period of the course material stretches from 1517 (Luther’s “99 Theses” unleash the Reformation) to 1789 (the French Revolution).

Some of the major topics to be explored in the course from a variety of disciplines (literature, art, history, philosophy, political theory, sociology) are:

1. Debates concerning Humanism and the Reformation (Luther and Erasmus)
2. The significance of the Thirty Years’ War, 1618-1648 (not just wars of religion)
3. Interactions with the Ottoman Empire and Islam (Shakespeare’s Othello and the  development of Renaissance art/perspective out of Arabic influences)
4. New attempts to ground philosophy in reason (Descartes) and their relation to  faith (Pascal, Kant)
5.  The rise of new forms of rationality (scientific, economic/capitalist)
6. The role of the state in relation to religion (Hobbes, Spinoza)
7. Enlightenment understandings of (religious) toleration (Nathan the Wise, a play  by the major German author Gotthold Ephraim Lessing)
8. The French Revolution, radical secularism (“laicism”), and the return of religion

All of these topics from the Early Modern period have immediate relevance for events unfolding in the world today.
Days: TU TH  12:30-01:50 PM

REL STD (W19)100  HIST OF THE DEVILMCKENNA, J.

Emphasis/Category: Thematic Approaches to Religion (Category 3)
Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1), Thematic Approaches to Religion (Category 3)
This course offers the history of an idea and a history of the effects of that idea. Students learn how numerous ancient mythological 'evil entities' in various world cultures contributed to the devil idea. Students then trace the development of devil traditions in ancient Zoroastrian, Jewish, Christian, and Islamic texts and contexts. Students then learn of the deadly effects of the devil idea: the devil idea fed centuries-long European anti-Jewish sentiment; it aided in the persecution and killing of European heretics; it was a major factor in a 300-year-long European satanic panic called the witchcraze, which executed some 100,000 'witches'. Next, students examine the uses of the devil in medieval European folklore and modern Western literature. Students then review a 1500-year history of devil iconography in Western art and a 100+ year history of the devil in Western films. Lastly, students survey the relation of the devil idea to very recent sociological phenomena like black metal music, satanism, satanic ritual abuse, and modern witchcraft. Along with lectures, there will be weekly readings (book chapters and/or handouts), weekly writing (short reviews of the reading), and weekly full-class discussions. Since the class meets once a week, any absence has a very ill effect on grades. One final exam (comprehensive). By the way: the class is not an examination of---or a promotion of---the occult.
Days: WE  03:00-05:50 PM

REL STD (W19)100  CHRISTNITY &SCIENCERAPHAEL, R.

Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1), Thematic Approaches to Religion (Category 3)
No description is currently available.
Days: Mo We  10:00-10:50 AM

REL STD (W19)130  ANCIENT JUDAISMGROSS, S.

Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1)
No description is currently available.
Days: Tu Th  02:00-03:20 PM