Term:  

Fall Quarter

Dept Course No and Title Instructor
PHILOS (F17)201  FIRST YEAR SEMINARFIOCCO, M.
Since one’s senses are supposed to be the primary means of one’s access to things in the mind-independent world, elementary questions about perception pertain to the most basic engagement between a mind and what is beyond it.  In contemporary philosophy, it is no longer widely held that one perceives things via mind-dependent intermediaries, such as sense-data.  Much more accepted is the view that, in perception, one’s engagement with the world is direct.  This is direct realism.    There are supposed to be pressing problems for such a view, given illusions and hallucinations, but even among those who think such problems are tractable, there is much controversy regarding the operative notion of directness.  The predominant position is representationalism (or intentionalism).  According to this position, the directness of one’s perceptual experience is ultimately to be understood in terms of the content of that experiential state, that is, how the world is represented as being when one is in that state.  This position is rejected by other direct realists, so-called naïve realists, who maintain that the directness of perception is ultimately to be understood in terms of a (non-representational) relation that holds between the perceiver and that thing in the world that is perceived.  The focus of the seminar is this controversy among direct realists.  We will try to determine what, if anything, is really at stake between proponents of representationalism and naïve realism, whether these positions are, to some extent, complementary or, if they are incompatible, which is the correct one.  Readings tentatively include papers by (among others) Susanna Siegel, M.G.F. Martin, Susanna Schellenberg, Bill Brewer, Heather Logue, and Tim Crane.
PHILOS (F17)205A  SET THEORYWALSH, S.
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PHILOS (F17)206  MODAL LOGICWALSH, S.
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PHILOS (F17)210  PLATOPERIN, C.
A closely reading, with a sample of relevant secondary literature, of Plato's Meno and Theaetetus.
PHILOS (F17)213  DESCARTES: METAPHYSICS, PHYSICS, AND ETHICSGREENBERG, S.
In the Preface of the *Principles of Philosophy*, Descartes says that "all of philosophy is like a tree: the roots are metaphysics, the trunk is physics, and the branches emerging from the tree are all the other sciences, which may be reduced to three principal ones, namely medicine, mechanics, and morals."  In this course, we will examine aspects of each of the parts of this tree of philosophy.  We will focus on the metaphysical roots, articulated in the *Meditations on First Philosophy*, which we will read in its entirety, in conjunction with the reworking of the *Meditations* in Part 1 of the *Principles of Philosophy*; we will also consider the implications for physics of Descartes's metaphysics, through consideration of selections from the *Discourse on Method*, Part 2 of the *Principles of Philosophy* and Part 1 of the *Passions of the Soul*; we will conclude by considering Descartes's ethics, as it emerges in letters and in Part 3 of the *Passions of the Soul*.

Same as LPS 213. 
PHILOS (F17)230  TOPICS IN ETHICSGILBERT, M.
This course will follow the thread of Professor Gilbert's forthcoming book Rights and Demands: A Foundational Inquiry (Oxford University Press). Starting with some basic distinctions from within rights theory, it focuses on the kind of right that accrues to those who make promises and agreements, among others.  Someone who has such a right to a particular action of some person has the standing to demand that action from that person. How does one human being gain the standing to demand an action of another? That is the guiding question of the course. Rights theorists and others whose writings are discussed in relation to this question include:Wesley Hohfeld, Judith Thomson, Joseph Raz, H. L. A Hart, and Stephen Darwall.
PHILOS (F17)241  PROB & DETERMINISMMANCHAK, J.
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PHILOS (F17)244  SOCIAL DYNAMICSSKYRMS, B.
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PHILOS (F17)247  PHILOS OF MATH IMADDY, P.
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