Term:  

Spring Quarter

Dept Course No and Title Instructor
PHILOS (S19)205C  INCOMPLETENESSMEADOWS, T.
Visit the Logic and Philosophy of Science website for more information.
PHILOS (S19)206  MODAL LOGICBENCIVENGA, E.
A discussion of the philosophy of modal logic, with reference to work by Quine, Kripke, and others.
PHILOS (S19)206  TOPICS IN LOGICMEADOWS, T.
Visit the Logic and Philosophy of Science website for more information.
PHILOS (S19)213  REASON IN KANTSCHAFER, K.
In this course we will investigate Kant’s conception of reason, in both its theoretical and practical manifestations, with an eye towards the foundational significance of the unity of reason for Kant’s overall philosophical project.
PHILOS (S19)215  HIST OF ANALYTIC IIHEIS, J.
Visit the Logic and Philosophy of Science website for more information.
PHILOS (S19)243  FDN OF HAPPINESSNARENS, L.
Visit the Cognitive Sciences website for more information.
PHILOS (S19)244  PHIL OF SOC PHENOMGILBERT, M.
Over the past thirty years philosophers have become increasingly interested in the nature of the social world. The kinds of questions discussed include the following. When do two or more people count as doing something together, such as going for a walk together? What are we talking about when we speak of the beliefs of groups as opposed to the beliefs of individual human beings? Is such talk merely a shorthand way of talking about what all or most group members think? What about group emotions? When two or more people agree on a plan of action, what is it exactly that they do? That is, what is an agreement? What sense can be made of the notion of an “implicit” agreement? Do implicit agreements obligate? And in what way do any agreements obligate the parties to respect the terms of the agreement? To what extent, if at all, does it make sense to think of the partners in a long-term relationship as “two become one”? More generally, to what kind of group is the notion of a “unity” of persons clearly applicable? The answers to such questions bear on central issues in moral, political, and legal philosophy. Such issues include the following. What sense, if any, can be made of a “social contract” that lies at the heart of a political society? Can a group---as opposed to its individual members---be blameworthy? If so, what are the implications of group blameworthiness to that of the individual members of the group? What kinds of punishment of groups, if any, are morally justifiable? How strong a barrier do group beliefs and emotions such as distrust and hostility towards other groups present to the reconciliation of groups in conflict? This course will focus on some of the central questions in the field.
PHILOS (S19)246  LOGIC SEMINARHEIS, J.
Visit the Logic and Philosophy of Science website for more information.