Term:  

Spring Quarter

Dept Course No and Title Instructor
PHILOS (S20)1  INTRO TO PHILOSOPHYHELMREICH, J.
A selection of philosophical problems, concepts, and methods, e.g., free will, cause and substance, personal identity, the nature of philosophy itself. Materials fee.

(IV)
PHILOS (S20)2  PUZZLES & PARADOXESSCHAFER, K.
Introduction to the formal tools needed to comprehend and evaluate philosophical arguments and theoretical reasoning in general.

(IV and VB ).
PHILOS (S20)3  TECH & SOCIETYCAPISANI, S.
Technology is pervasive in contemporary society, affecting virtually every facet of human existence.  It is commonplace in our homes and work. It has transformed our communities, including affecting the very meaning of the word community.  It has made the world smaller through advances in communication and afforded new ways to interact with others. As technology has become so central to our lives, we often take it for granted and neglect to think deeply about its impact and ethical issues that arise from its creation, use, and implementation. This course is designed to encourage such reflection by inviting you into a deeper discourse on technology, its impacts, and what relationship ethics has to technology and society. We will examine the relationship between ethics, and the notion of progress that arises in the context of emerging technologies. We will consider different applications and ethical consequences of the development and use of technology in different domains, such as in its use to address climate change, its application to energy and the environment, food production, information and communication, military use, human enhancement, biomedical technologies, etc.
PHILOS (S20)4  INTRODUCTION TO ETHICSHELMREICH, J.
Selected topics from the history of ethics, e.g., the nature of the good life and the moral justification of conduct.

(IV)
PHILOS (S20)13  HIST CONTEM PHILOSBONCOMPAGNI, A.
This course focuses on American pragmatism. We will read classical pragmatists such as Charles s. Peirce, William James and John Dewey, but also Jane Addams and other lesser known women thinkers, and will also consider some more recent perspectives. Topics include knowledge, truth, language, common sense, belief and action, education and society.
PHILOS (S20)21  INTRO PHIL & RELIGNDONALDSON, B.
Religious claims are of particular interest to philosophers because they raise important metaphysical issues. These issues include the ultimate nature of reality, the distinction between mind, body, and soul, the existence or character of God/gods, the problem of evil and suffering, afterlife, the relationship between humans, animals, and plants, as well as the link between rationality and belief, among others. Utilizing methods and concepts in the field, we will look at several of these issues, with additional reference to related themes such as religion and science, the role of morality, and religious pluralism. Our sources will include classic western philosophical debates, with some reference to views from the Indian traditions—Jainism, Buddhism, and Hinduism—as well as perspectives through the lens of race, gender, and species.
PHILOS (S20)30  INTR SYMBOLIC LOGICWEHMEIER, K.
Visit the Logic and Philosophy of Science website for more information.
PHILOS (S20)31  INTRO INDUCT LOGICROTHFUS, G.
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PHILOS (S20)103  INTR TO MORAL PHILJAMES, A.
Speech Ethics: This course will consider how moral theory might help illuminate a variety of questions about the ethics of speech.  Topics include: insults, slurs and hate speech; "silencing" and misogyny; "call outs" and "calling bullshit"; "bullshitting," "fake news," and propaganda; "mansplaining," testimony and credibility; U.S. "free speech" exceptionalism; and the cooperative "speech commons" required for functioning democracy.
PHILOS (S20)105C  INCOMPLETENESSMEADOWS, T.
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PHILOS (S20)110  TOPICS ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY - STOICISMPERIN, C.
Stoicism was a philosophical school of thought founded in the fourth century BCE by Zeno of Citium that became particularly influential during the Roman imperial period. Bizarrely, it also seems to be fashionable now among the entrepeneurs and programmers of Silicon Valley. In fact, Stoicism is alive and well in contemporary culture. There is a popular website called The Daily Stoic, an annual conference of those who think of themselves as modern Stoics (yes, it's called 'Stoicon'), and shelves of Stoic themed self-help manuals with titles like The Obstacle is the Way, Stoicism: How to Stop Fearing and Start Living, and How to Think Like a Roman Emperor. In this course we'll read and try to make sense of the most important ancient Stoic texts. We'll start with the philosopher who inspired Zeno and whom the Stoics themselves counted as the first Stoic, Socrates. We'll then turn to writings by Seneca, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius. Our task will be to determine whether Stoicism is really a plausible guide to the good life or just an elaborate, maybe even pernicious, philosophical fantasy.
PHILOS (S20)130  ANIMAL ETHICSDONALDSON, B.
In their definition of religion, Emile Durkheim and Mircea Eliade present the human/animal boundary as a fundamental hallmark of the discipline, one often overlooked in contemporary studies of “animals and religion.” In this course we will utilize this fundamental binary to identify the construction of  “human” and “animal” subjectivities in religious narratives such as Jewish, Islamic, Christian, Jain, and Buddhist, as well as in other scientific and ethical accounts of humans and animals, including those considered secular. We will identify practices and modes of thinking that might disturb this conceptual binary, creating new opportunities for rethinking identity, community, and response beyond species lines.
PHILOS (S20)143  EVOL OF HUM MRL PSYSTANFORD, P.
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PHILOS (S20)144  THE SOCIAL CONTRACTSKYRMS, B.
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PHILOS (S20)163  SOCIAL EPISTEMOLOGYBONCOMPAGNI, A.
A selection of topics in social epistemology with a special emphasis on testimony, implicit bias, background assumptions, prejudice, feminist epistemology, and the epistemology of resistance. We will work on the blurred boundary between common sense certainties and deeply entrenched prejudices, making use of the Wittgenstein-inspired perspective of hinge epistemology in the social domain.
PHILOS (S20)165  PHILOSOPHY OF ACTIONGREENBERG, S.
It might seem to be a commonplace that we are only responsible for what we do. But is this
commonplace correct? In order to answer this question, it needs to be determined just what we
do—i.e., what actions are—and what we are responsible for—i.e., what responsibility is. This
course will examine the nature of actions and the nature of responsibility in order to determine just
what we do, whether—and if so—why we are responsible for what we do, and whether we are only
responsible for what we do.