Term:  

Fall Quarter

Dept Course No and Title Instructor
PHILOS (F19)1  INTRO TO PHILOSOPHYPRITCHARD, D.
Online: This course provides a general introduction to the main topics in philosophy. The topics covered include: Ethics, Political Philosophy, Aesthetics, Epistemology, Philosophy of Mind, Metaphysics, Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of Religion, and The Meaning of Life.

(IV)
PHILOS (F19)2  PUZZLES & PARADOXESFIOCCO, M.O.
Introduction to the formal tools needed to comprehend and evaluate philosophical arguments and theoretical reasoning in general.

(IV and VB ).
PHILOS (F19)4  INTRODUCTION TO ETHICSPRITCHARD, D.
Online: We will be taking a broad approach to ethics whereby our focus will not be exclusively on moral questions specifically, but rather on the bigger ethical challenge of how one ought to live. To this end, we will be examining the good life and its constituent parts. In the process, we will be covering a wide range of philosophical topics in areas such as political philosophy, aesthetics, epistemology, philosophy of religion, and the meaning of life.

(IV)
PHILOS (F19)5  CONTEMP MORAL PRBLMCAPISANI, S.
Selected moral issues of current interest, e.g., abortion, sexual morality, euthanasia, capital punishment, reverse discrimination, civil disobedience, or violence.

(IV)
PHILOS (F19)10  HIST ANCIENT PHILOSPERIN, C.
Examination of the central philosophical themes developed by the pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, the Epicureans, and the Skeptics.

(IV)
PHILOS (F19)29  CRITICAL REASONINGHEIS, J.
Visit the Logic and Philosophy of Science website for more information.
PHILOS (F19)101  INTR TO METAPHYSICSFIOCCO, M.
A study of one or more of the problems of "first philosophy," e.g., substance, free will, causation, abstract entities, identity.
PHILOS (F19)104  INTRO TO LOGICSTAFF
Visit the Logic and Philosophy of Science website for more information.
PHILOS (F19)105A  ELEMENTARY SET THRYMEADOWS, T.
Visit the Logic and Philosophy of Science website for more information.
PHILOS (F19)162  SOCIAL ONTOLOGYSMITH, D.
Ontology is the study of what exists, what kinds of things there are in the world, and what is their mode of being. We think of natural processes such as lightning or natural objects such as stones, trees, animal organisms. We also think of mental processes of consciousness, perception, thought, emotion, will, and embodied intentional action. And we also think of social activities, organizations, and institutions such as playing soccer, the University of California, the United States; we think of social norms, from formal laws to implicit cultural rules, and we consider ideas and values that are themselves products of social activity. Social ontology concerns the ontology of these varied kinds of social phenomena, seeking their place in the world.

We shall study social ontology by drawing on two traditions: recent work in analytic philosophy, growing out of philosophy of mind and language; and a century’s work in phenomenology, the study of consciousness, intentionality both individual and collective, intersubjectivity, and the constitution of social phenomena grounded in collective interaction of subjects or agents.
PHILOS (F19)164  WELL-BEINGPERIN, C.
Some people lead lives that are good for them, while other people (and far too many) lead lives that are bad for them or even, at the extreme, not worth living at all. What exactly is it that makes a life good or bad for the person living it? What must she get or do or be in order for her life to go well for her? In short, what is required for a person to have a good life? This is the basic philosophical question about well-being. Philosophers have given very different answers to this question. On one view the good life is simply a life that contains more pleasure than pain. According to the hedonist, the good life is the pleasurable or pleasant life. On another view, having a good life is a matter of getting whatever it is you want (where that may or may not mean that your life contains more pleasure than pain). On this view, well-being is a matter of having your desires satisfied.  A third view has it that the good life is the flourishing life where flourishing is a matter of being a good member of one's kind. On a fourth view, there are things that are good for a person regardless of whether that person desires them or takes pleasure in them. It is the presence of these things in a person's life that makes her life good, and their absence makes her life bad. A description of the good life, on this view, takes the form of a list of those things that are objectively good for a human being. In this course, we'll consider the merits of each of these views of well-being and consider their bearing on important contemporary issues.