Term:  

Fall Quarter

Dept Course No and Title Instructor
PHILOS (F21)1  INTRO TO PHILOSOPHYPRITCHARD, D.
This course provides a general introduction to the main topics in philosophy. The topics covered include: Ethics, Political Philosophy, Aesthetics, Epistemology, Philosophy of Mind, Metaphysics, Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of Religion, and The Meaning of Life.

(IV)
PHILOS (F21)2  PUZZLES & PARADOXESSTAFF
Introduction to the formal tools needed to comprehend and evaluate philosophical arguments and theoretical reasoning in general.

(IV and VB ).
PHILOS (F21)3  TECH & SOCIETYSTAFF
A study of the nature of technology, its relation to human values, the philosophical assumptions in its development, and the philosophical implications of technology.

(II)
PHILOS (F21)4  INTRO TO ETHICSSTAFF
Selected topics from the history of ethics, e.g., the nature of the good life and the moral justification of conduct.

(IV)
PHILOS (F21)12  HIST MODERN PHILOSGREENBERG, S.
Questions that first arose in early modern philosophy continue to shape present-day thought on a variety of topics, including: What is the nature of knowledge?  What does sensory experience contribute to knowledge?  Is the knowledge of which human beings are capable different in kind from the knowledge of which animals are capable?  What is the nature of the relation between mind and body?  What is human freedom, and is it even possible for humans to be free?  What is the relation between science and human experience?  These questions, and answers to them, originate in the early modern period, and they continue to be discussed to this day.  We will examine the questions and answers to them--as well as other questions and answers--advanced in three classic works of philosophy written in the early modern period: Descartes's *Meditations on First Philosophy*; Hume's *An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding*; and Kant's *Critique of Pure Reason*.
PHILOS (F21)22  INTRO LAW & SOCIETYHELMREICH, J.
The law comes up in almost every part of our lives. But the practice of law still has its own norms and values, which might be questioned from outside. For example: why defend guilty people? Why should a lawyer discredit an honest witness? Why make an injurer pay for all the harm he inflicted if it was an accident? Why release a guilty defendant because of how the evidence was gathered? What does “presumed innocent” and “beyond a reasonable doubt” mean, and what’s the difference between legal proof and ordinary proof? The course explores these and related questions, drawing on cases, news items and leading scholars.
PHILOS (F21)29  CRITICAL REASONINGSTAFF
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PHILOS (F21)30  INTR SYMBOLIC LOGICWEHMEIER, K.
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PHILOS (F21)104  INTRO TO LOGICSTAFF
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PHILOS (F21)105A  ELEMENTARY SET THRYMEADOWS, T.
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PHILOS (F21)121  TOPICS THRY KNWLDGEPRITCHARD, D.
This course will offer a comprehensive overview of the core area of philosophy known as epistemology. The topics covered include: theories of knowledge; modal epistemology; virtue epistemology; epistemic externalism/internalism; radical scepticism; epistemic value; understanding. There will also be some discussion of applied epistemology, which is the application of theoretical work in epistemology to particular domains, such as law or education.
PHILOS (F21)130  TPC IN MORAL PHILOSGILBERT, M.
Rights and obligations in a social world

In everyday life many of our encounters and relationships result in rights and obligations. For instance, if I promise to phone you tomorrow, you now have a right to my calling you then, and I have an obligation to do so. But what are rights and obligations, and how exactly do we come by them? Do we have some rights irrespective of our specific encounters and relationships with others? This course will focus on such questions, drawing on the work of moral, legal, and social theorists.
PHILOS (F21)140  PHILOS OF MEDICINEROSS, L.
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PHILOS (F21)140  RISE OF SCIENCERAPHAEL, R.
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PHILOS (F21)141B  GEOMETRY&SPACETIMEMANCHAK, J.
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PHILOS (F21)199H  INDEPENDENT STUDIESFIOCCO, M.
Independent study on a research topic supervised by a faculty member, with the objective of preparing the Department of Philosophy honors paper.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.