Jackson Mac Low

ICWT Initiatives

Please click on an initiative to expand the description:

» Writing and Injustice

Writing and Injustice:  This series focuses on places in the world where the phenomenon of social and economic injustice is creating conditions that impel writers to migrate or to write under the threat of censorship, imprisonment, or worse.  The ICWT was originally committed to a "translators-in-exile" initiative.  We will revive this initiative and extend it to the category of "writers-at-risk" and “writing on the border.”

While we are committed to this initiative, we also fund other projects on a competitive basis in the following areas:

  • Creative writing (prose fiction, poetry, plays);
  • Creative non-fiction writing (journalism, memoirs, essays, historical writing that explores modes of writing and narration outside standard academic forms, experimental poet-critic writing, manifestoes, creative glosses, multi-media works, digital hybrids);
  • A translation of a work or part of a work;
  • A workshop, lecture, conference, performance, reading of event featuring a creative writer or translator.
ICWT Fellowship proposals will be evaluated by the Advisory Committee.
Deadlines to apply for ICWT Fellowships are as follows:

October 15 (proposals for projects scheduled for Winter or Spring) January 15 (proposals for projects scheduled for Fall, Winter, or Spring of the next academic year)

YOUR PROPOSAL should contain a brief description of the event; the cv of the principal investigator; a bibliography of the writer or translator being proposed; a preliminary budget.

Please forward proposals to the Director:  cjnoland@uci.edu

» Writing in the Expanded Field

Writing in the Expanded Field:  Writing takes a plethora of forms in a variety of fields (mark-making, inscription, musical notation systems, choreography). In keeping with this broader understanding of writing, the ICWT welcomes proposals for cross-media or multi-media events.

Participatory events are particularly encouraged.

The ICWT will inaugurate this series with a re-staging of The Pronouns:

40 Dances for the Dancers by the Fluxus poet, Jackson Mac Low.  Clarinda Mac Low, the poet's daughter, will remain in residence for nine days in March 2020 and collaborate with Carrie Noland (French), Simon Leung (Art), and Lisa Naugle (Dance) to mount the verbal instruction-based dance on local dancers and non-dancers.  There will be performances on March 13 and 14 and a one-day colloquium on Jackson Mac Low and the Judson Dance Theater on March 14.

Also under the umbrella of this series we are hoping to bring the choreographer Lucille Toth to campus in 2020 to re-stage her "Borders" project with UCI students.  She is currently working with immigrants in Nogales (Arizona/Mexico) who verbalize their experience of border-crossing, translate it into gestures, and work with Toth to produce a dance.

ICWT Fellowship proposals will be evaluated by the Advisory Committee.
Deadlines to apply for ICWT Fellowships are as follows:

October 15 (proposals for projects scheduled for Winter or Spring) January 15 (proposals for projects scheduled for Fall, Winter, or Spring of the next academic year)

YOUR PROPOSAL should contain a brief description of the event; the cv of the principal investigator; a bibliography of the writer or translator being proposed; a preliminary budget.

Please forward proposals to the Director:  cjnoland@uci.edu

» Untranslating Theory

To support a greater understanding of theoretical and philosophical texts written in a foreign language, the ICWT will fund a series of "Pop-Up Seminars," one-time 3-hour seminars focusing on a single text.  The goal is to *un-translate* the text, to explore its greater connotative complexity and the genealogy/etymology of its philosophemes.  Faculty members are invited to propose a "Pop-Up Seminar" for graduate students (and any interested faculty) across the campus.  Students may also suggest a text to be "un-translated."   Guest faculty from outside the campus are also eligible.  It is not necessary for the participants of the Pop-Up Seminar to be able to read the foreign language (in fact, the initiative is designed for participants who cannot read the language of the text, or who can read it only with difficulty).  Some possibilities:  Agamben in Italian; Foucault in French; Avicenna in Arabic; Plato in Greek.

The ICWT will reward the professor with research funds of $250.  

The participating graduate students will be invited to give a short talk at an end-of-the-year conference followed by a reception hosted by the ICWT.

The first iteration,  "Pop Up Heidegger," will be taught by Professor Kai Evers (German, European Languages & Studies) on Thursday, November 14th at noon.