Comparative Literature Graduate Course Descriptions

Term:  

Fall Quarter

Dept Course No and Title Instructor
COM LIT (F19)200A  HIST&THEORY COM LITJOHNSON, A.
No detailed description available.
COM LIT (F19)200B  THRY OF TRANSLATIONNEWMAN, J.
Comparative Literature, with its proclivity for crossing borders of all sorts—linguistic, medium-specific, and theoretical—has long emphasized the centrality of translation as a concept and practice crucial to the field. Indeed, there could be no “comparative” literature without the implicit attempt to bridge, or to “translate,” the space between languages, cultures, nationalities, and traditions. It is in terms of this in-between of textual studies in other media across a wide range of languages and cultures that scholars of Comparative Literature have been occupied by the inherently intercultural questions of translation theory and methodology. Post-colonial theorists, students of cultural studies, and practitioners of interdisciplinary approaches to problematizing race, class, and gender codes all agree that studying both literal and figurative translation – in its successful iterations and in its failures – is central to what they do. Literary translation—and the translation of literature—is, finally, both a major field in itself and a highly politicized activity in an increasingly interconnected world. This seminar will examine some of the fundamental questions about the practice, art, and politics of translation on an intra- and international stage.

Readings address the history of translation theory, historical and recent problematizations of the use of translations in Comparative Literature as a discipline and the often minoritized place of translation studies in the field, as well as feminist and post-colonial approaches to the ethics of the often asymmetrical practice of translating. Theories of authorship and the cultural authority of ‘originals’ and translated texts, and the challenges of creating ‘domesticating’ or ‘foreignizing’ translations that render original and translation visible or invisible in both the texts themselves and in the marketplace of ideas and material goods will also be studied. Finally: The application of psychoanalytic theory to translation studies, the refusal of translation evident in the recent turn to Untranslatability Studies, and the challenges of translation in war zones and in domestic surveillance will form part of the course.

Students may fulfill one of the Comparative Literature language requirements by enrolling in this class and completing a translation project (with supervision from additional faculty when the translations are from languages other than French and German); the translation must be accompanied by a substantive preface that engages the theoretical materials covered in the course to satisfy the requirement. Seminar options include such a project or a research paper. Pro-seminar options include two translation exercises and a short essay that embeds the student’s translating practice in the materials covered in the course. The pro-seminar option will not fulfill a Comparative Literature language requirement.
COM LIT (F19)210  INTERSECTIONALITIESRADHAKRISHNAN, R.
The temporal "after" in the title of the course could also be read spatially as "beyond": the time-spaces or the chronotopes beyond INTERSECTIONALITIES. And as for INTERSECTIONALITIES, you all know what I mean.  For more than an academic generation now, this term/concept/paradigm has been unfailingly effective in helping us understand, both theoretically and historically-experientially and discursively, the multiple but simultaneous nature of oppression-domination-colonization along lines of race, class, gender, sexuality, colonization, and more.  Thanks to intersectional analysis as initiated by Critical Race theory, it became possible to produce sophisticated analyses and interpretations, both aggregated and disaggregated, of different trajectories of the emergence of "subjugated knowledges," their modes of identity and subject formation, their preferences of representational, post-representational, and coalitional practices.  Thanks to intersectional awareness, hegemony could be read symptomatically even in its imperceptibly unsutured articulations and complicities.  But the time has now come to ask the following questions: has intersectionality itself become hegemonic?  Has intersectionality enabled dubious notions of fungibility, facile formulations of post-identitarian, post-representational neoliberal coalitional practices that shore up and perpetuate deep structure imbalances and unevennesses and asymmetries?  Has intersectionality been seduced by the political mantra of "winner take all" and thereby turned traitor to its original impulse of incorruptible critical negativity in the name of one and all?  In other words, has intersectionality now found a proper, exceptionalist, and sovereign agent-subject-owner, in violation of its originary commitment to non-sovereign ways of living and thinking?

This seminar will be an attempt to revisit intersectionality and read its history both with and against the grain, and to speculate what the future  may hold after/beyond.  After such knowledge, what can "after" and "beyond" mean?

Tentative Readings: Readings: Kimberle Crenshaw, Du Bois, Frantz Fanon, Denise de Silvia, Sylvia Wynter, Adrienne Rich, Virginia Woolf, Chantal Mouffe and Ernesto Laclau, Judith Butler, Jared Sexton, Frank Wilderson, Saidia Hartman, Hortense Spillers, Sara Ahmed, Lata Mani, Chandra Talpade Mohanty, Jacqui Alexander, Helene Cixous Donna Haraway Angela Davis, Cherrie Moraga, Gloria Anzaldu
COM LIT (F19)290  READING&CONFERENCEABBAS, M.
No detailed description available.
COM LIT (F19)290  READING&CONFERENCEMOR, L.
No detailed description available.
COM LIT (F19)290  READING&CONFERENCEAMIRAN, E.
No detailed description available.
COM LIT (F19)290  READING&CONFERENCEGOLDBERG, D.
No detailed description available.
COM LIT (F19)290  READING&CONFERENCEAHMAD, A.
No detailed description available.
COM LIT (F19)290  READING&CONFERENCEJOHNSON, A.
No detailed description available.
COM LIT (F19)290  READING&CONFERENCENEWMAN, J.
No detailed description available.
COM LIT (F19)290  READING&CONFERENCERAHIMIEH, N.
No detailed description available.
COM LIT (F19)290  READING&CONFERENCESCHLICHTER, A.
No detailed description available.
COM LIT (F19)290  READING&CONFERENCENOLAND, C.
No detailed description available.
COM LIT (F19)290  READING&CONFERENCESCHWAB, G.
No detailed description available.
COM LIT (F19)290  READING&CONFERENCETERADA, R.
No detailed description available.
COM LIT (F19)290  READING&CONFERENCETHIONG'O, N.
No detailed description available.
COM LIT (F19)290  READING&CONFERENCEJARRATT, S.
No detailed description available.
COM LIT (F19)290  READING&CONFERENCERADHAKRISHNAN, R.
No detailed description available.