Krieger Hall
Term:  

Winter Quarter

Dept Course No and Title Instructor
HISTORY (W21)11  GENOCIDE SINCE WWIICOLLER, I.
The term “genocide” was coined in 1944 to describe “a crime without a name”: the destruction of a whole people by the Nazi regime. In 1948, faced with the horrors of mass killing in Europe, the whole world came together to sign a United Nations Convention against Genocide. Yet in the 50 years after 1945, the world stayed silent as millions were slaughtered in Cambodia, Bosnia and Rwanda.
Should we intervene to prevent genocide? After the military interventions in Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya, the West has little appetite for invasions. Few solutions have been offered to prevent genocidal murders in Syria or North Africa, now carried out not only by governments, but by terrorist groups like ISIS. Yet the past shows us that ignoring these warnings can lead to catastrophe.

This course will investigate the major instances of genocide since 1945, and why the world failed to intervene. It will explore the notion of Crimes Against Humanity, and ask whether greater attention to these crimes could help to stop genocide before it begins. The course will be focused on understanding the trauma and aftermath of genocide, and on preventing such crimes in the future.

(III, VIII)
HISTORY (W21)15A  NATIVE AMERICAN HISMOONEY D'ARCY, A.
An overview of major developments in Indian-white relations from the American Revolution to the present with an emphasis on political and legal history. How tribal sovereignty has been redefined over time is a central theme of the course.

(IV, VII)
HISTORY (W21)15F  WHAT TO EAT AMERICACHEN, Y.
“What to eat?” is a question that humans have always asked. For hunters and gatherers living many millennia ago, the question reflected the difficulty of obtaining the basic food to sustain the body. For food writers like Michael Pollan, it is a question about the choices that people make in an age of food abundance – choices that also have profound social, political, and moral implications and consequences. In the United States, the question “what to eat” has been shaped by continuous waves of immigration. This course discusses shifting patterns of immigration and major US immigration policies. And it explores the relationship between immigration and changing American foodways. We will focus on the impact of Asians, Mexicans, Italians, Irish, and Jews, among others, on America’s gastronomical and socioeconomic landscape. The class will also help students better understand local ethnic communities in California.

((III or IV) and VII )
HISTORY (W21)16B  WORLD RELIGIONS IITINSLEY, E.
An introduction to various religious traditions in selected areas of the world—including India and South Asia, East Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Same as REL STD 5B.

Same as REL STD 5B.

(IV and VIII )
HISTORY (W21)21B  WORLD:EMPIRE&REVOLTBAUM, E./RAPHAEL, R.
This course will introduce students to
major themes in early modern world history, with a focus on the interconnections and circulations of people, commodities, and ideas around the globe. Lectures will provide students with historical context to understand how different peoples conceived of the
world around them; exchanged goods, technologies, and ideas; and created and subsequently interacted with emerging global forces and ideologies, both liberating and oppressive. Through an examination of primary source documents, students will develop skills
in historical interpretation to develop and assess historical arguments.

(IV, VIII)
HISTORY (W21)37C  THE FALL OF ROMEZISSOS, P.
A survey of Roman civilization from the crisis of the third century CE to the so-called “fall of Rome” in 476 CE. Examines political and social history, as well as literature, art, architecture, and religion.

Same as CLASSIC 37C.

(IV)
HISTORY (W21)40B  19C US:CRISIS&EXPANMILLWARD, J.
Nineteenth century America can teach us a lot about this present moment. Why is the debate about immigration so divided? Why are Americans skeptical or in favor of the 1%?  Should Americans get past slavery? Why is access to the vote so important? What are the origins of feminism? What can reality TV tell us about the Robber Barons? Who was Alexander Hamilton beyond a character in a Broadway musical?

This class is taught from a social history perspective, which means we will focus on the lives of people during the 19th century--a critical century of crisis and expansion.  We will use the past to better understand the present moment. We will answer the above questions and so many more. This class pivots around the themes of resistance, activism and change. We will witness indigenous people fighting against American expansion; enslaved people fighting for freedom; workers demanding rights in the industrial age; and finally, Northern and Southern citizens fighting in the Civil War and living in its aftermath. 

This class will be taught 100% A sync with remote lectures and learning assignments.

Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

(IV)
HISTORY (W21)40B  19C US:CRISIS&EXPANMILLWARD, J.
Nineteenth century America can teach us a lot about this present moment. Why is the debate about immigration so divided? Why are Americans skeptical or in favor of the 1%?  Should Americans get past slavery? Why is access to the vote so important? What are the origins of feminism? What can reality TV tell us about the Robber Barons? Who was Alexander Hamilton beyond a character in a Broadway musical?

This class is taught from a social history perspective, which means we will focus on the lives of people during the 19th century--a critical century of crisis and expansion.  We will use the past to better understand the present moment. We will answer the above questions and so many more. This class pivots around the themes of resistance, activism and change. We will witness indigenous people fighting against American expansion; enslaved people fighting for freedom; workers demanding rights in the industrial age; and finally, Northern and Southern citizens fighting in the Civil War and living in its aftermath.

This class will be taught 100% A sync with remote lectures and learning assignments.

Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

(IV)
HISTORY (W21)70F  THE WORLD IN 1900WASSERSTROM, J.
How can looking at the events of a single year illuminate questions such as the changing contours of what we now refer to as “globalization,” which has been going on for well over a century even if it was not called that until the 1960s? What countries are powerful now but were powerless six or seven generations ago? What empires were extensive in that era but have now ceased to exist? How did news circulate when telegraph lines were as crucial and novel a technology for moving information around the globe as the Internet would be in the early 2000s? These are the questions we will look at in this course, focusing mainly on events in the United States, Britain, and China during a single eventful year: 1900.

(IV, VIII)
HISTORY (W21)70D  BLACK HARLEMJAMES, W.
Harlem has been one of the most remarkable black communities the world has ever known. To many—as the descriptions "Negro Mecca," "Black Capital of the World," and "Negro Metropolis" indicate—Harlem was the premier black community on planet earth. This course is aimed at exploring key aspects of the social, political and cultural history of Harlem. The period under review covers developments from the late nineteenth century, circa 1890, examining the rise of black Harlem through its decline and apparent resurrection at the end of the twentieth century. The course traces the founding of the black community in Harlem, outlines the latter's social and political struggles, and profiles the course of black Harlem's cultural development. A particularly important object of our analysis will be the astonishing and spectacular social, political and cultural ferment of the 1920s which generally goes under the label of "The Harlem Renaissance."

(IV)
HISTORY (W21)100W  CLIMATE HISTORYIGLER, D.
No detailed description available.
HISTORY (W21)100W  OIL & CAPITALISMSCHIELDS, C.
No other raw commodity has transformed our lives quite like oil. Cheap energy has facilitated the seemingly limitless growth of the economy, yet it has also been the most controversial. This course explores the human-centered history of oil. It charts the racialized and gendered labor that transformed oil into wealth, the mobile practices of oil companies that segregated workers by logics of race and nation, and the struggles to control oil wealth that shaped individuals, social classes, and states. Engaging secondary and primary sources produced in oil fields and booming company towns, students will work individually and in groups to develop – through a series of writing assignments – the craft of historical analysis and argumentation.
HISTORY (W21)100W  GALILEO ON TRIALRAPHAEL, R.
No detailed description available.
HISTORY (W21)100W  HIST NARRATIVESWASSERSTROM, J.
How is the past narrated in different genres, ranging from newspaper articles, diaries, and letters written just after something has occurred, to instant histories of events completed a bit later, to memoirs and studies penned much later? This class will explore these issues and have students experiment with writing about the same events in different ways. It will do this by reading and discussing texts from two dramatic years that were marked by global crises of different sorts: 1900 and 2020.
HISTORY (W21)114  REVOLUTIONARY WOMENMORRISSEY, S.
Why have women become revolutionaries? What kind of experiences did they have? How did sex and gender become part of revolutionary politics? Are there broader patterns and influences that cross time and space? This course seeks to examines these questions through the lens of several revolutionary moments in which women took prominent roles as activists and leaders. While we will look briefly at the longer history of women’s activism and revolutionary traditions, our main focus will be on case studies from the late 19th to the mid-20th century, including Russia, Ireland, and Algeria. Our sources will range from memoirs and autobiographies to letters, revolutionary tracts, and works of fiction, and we will watch several films, including The Battle of Algiers.
HISTORY (W21)126B  WORLD WAR II ERAFARMER, S.
This class addresses the history of the Second World War within the context of its origins in Europe. The course will discuss some of the many wars that made up this global conflict, such as the civil wars between collaborators and resistance movements in Nazi-occupied Europe, the Allied bombing war that targeted civilians, the Nazi war against the European Jews. The course will highlight the moral dimensions of World War II that appeared in the daunting choices faced by both individuals and groups. We will examine the attempts, at the war's end, to administer justice and address questions of memory and of loss.
HISTORY (W21)128C  LOVE AND WARSCHIELDS, C.
In the 1960s, anti-war activists instructed their contemporaries to “make love, not war.” But are love and war, pleasure and violence truly incompatible? This course explores the troubling entanglement between desire and brutality in Europe’s modern era, spanning the violence of European overseas expansion to the scrambling of gender roles and the alleged breakdown of morality in twentieth-century global warfare. Placing gender and sexuality at the center of our study, we will reconsider Europe’s age of catastrophes by examining the eros of violence, the persuasive appeal of gender and sexual politics to varying political ideologies – including liberalism, fascism and communism – and the crises that shaped the intimate lives of European men and women.
HISTORY (W21)130C  JEWISH HISTORYLEHMANN, M.
In the mid-1700s, many thinkers of the European Enlightenment like the French philosopher Voltaire saw the Jews as backward and steeped in religious superstition. Just over a century later, the Jews were seen as pioneers of “modernity” in places as far apart as Berlin in Germany or Casablanca in Morocco. To study the history of the Jews in the modern world is to study the history of modern “European” culture, both on the continent and its periphery. At the same time, Jews were and remained on the margins of European society, fighting for their political emancipation and facing the onslaught of modern antisemitism, which culminated in the Nazi Holocaust in the twentieth century. This course will explore how Jews encountered modernity, how they resisted and how they participated in shaping it, how modern culture transformed their identity and how they themselves helped transform modern European culture.
HISTORY (W21)131B  ANCIENT PERSIADARYAEE, T.
How does the legacy of human evolution affect our world today?  How have technological innovations shaped human societies?  How have human societies explained the natural world and their place in it?  Given the abundance of religious beliefs in the world, how have three evangelical faiths spread far beyond their original homelands?
This class follows the major themes of world historical development through the sixteenth century to consider how developments in technology, social organization, and religion—from the origins of farming to the rise of Christianity—shaped the world we live in today.

(Satisfies Pre-1800 Requirement)
HISTORY (W21)142A  CALIFORNIA DREAMINGIGLER, D.
California is the “Great Exception.”  California is the “Leading Edge” State.  California is an Island or it’s a center of Global Trends.  The Land of Sunshine.  The Golden State, Gold Mountain, gam saan, Alta California, the Eastern Pacific.  These and many other designations carry great cultural weight in California history.  This course examines the history of California as a state, but it places the state within the broader context of the American West, the nation, and the world.  Lectures, discussions, movies, and other visual material will explore this history, spotlighting pivotal events and issues.
HISTORY (W21)144G  AFRICAN DIASPORAMILLER, R.
The concept of Diaspora has played a central role in guiding the identity formations of people of African descent in the Americas, as well as the social, political, and religious movements they constructed from the period of trans-Atlantic slavery to the present. Notions of an African Diaspora have been theorized, articulated, and utilized by Black intellectuals, organizers, and everyday people in a myriad of ways. This class seeks to historicize and examine the idea of an African Diaspora and the movements for Black self-determination it helped to inspire. We will begin by discussing varying theorizations of Diaspora, along with major debates regarding historical, cultural, and political connections between people of African descent around the world and those on the African continent. Subsequent course readings will be organized around several themes including: pan-Africanism, the political economy of the trans-Atlantic and trans-Saharan slave trades, African retentions and transferals, Black religious nationalism, Africans in Asia and the Middle East, Black resistance and Black Power, recent African immigration, and competing notions/meanings of blackness. All these topics will be examined within a transnational context and with special consideration for the dynamics of class, gender, and national identity.
HISTORY (W21)150  IDEA OF AMERICA ICHANDLER, N.
No detailed description available.
HISTORY (W21)152A  ASIANAM LABORFUJITA-RONY, D.
No detailed description available.
HISTORY (W21)169  MEXICO:PAST&PRESENTDUNCAN, R.
Mexico is an enigma—from tropical rainforests to searing deserts, pinnacles of wealth to depths of despair, it is a land of extremes. On the verge of collapse more than once, Mexico now boasts one of the world’s largest economies. This course introduces students to the story of Mexico’s formation and evolution from colonial times to the present. This will be a broad analysis of the place that history has played in national political structures, economic formations, and social movements. We will examine the indigenous roots of pre-Columbian Mexico, the impact of conquest and colonization, the struggle of nation-building, revolution, reconstruction, and development. Particular attention will focus on the forces—both internal and external—that have contributed to shaping a Mexican identity. These issues will be covered through lectures, videos, and primary/secondary readings.
HISTORY (W21)171D  CHINSE HIST TO 1800GUO, Q.
History 171D surveys the development of Chinese civilization from high antiquity through the eighteenth century.  Lectures will focus on political, intellectual, economic, and socio-cultural changes.  They will be organized chronologically, but emphasize certain important topics and large patterns in traditional Chinese history, including the emergence of a distinctive form of bureaucratic absolutism, the development of Confucian ideology and other classical age philosophies, the introduction and spread of Buddhism, the evolution of a hierarchical but fluid social structure, the great commercial booms in the tenth and sixteenth centuries, the growth of autocracy in the later imperial era, the rise of neo-Confucian orthodoxy, civil service examination culture and the rise of the gentry, the elaboration of the Confucian gender system, the development of folk religion, and the interaction between elite and popular cultures.

​(Satisfies Pre-1800 Requirement)
HISTORY (W21)173G  THE TWO KOREASFEDMAN, D.
As seen today, the Korean peninsula is home to two starkly different societies: a pop-culture powerhouse and a geopolitical pariah; a plugged-in innovator in consumer electronics and a closed-off authoritarian regime; a democratically elected government and a military dictatorship. These striking contrasts, however, belie a shared history and heritage. Taking the long view of the emergence and divergence of both polities, this course explores Korea’s remarkable transformation over the twentieth century, a period that witnessed colonial liberation as well as devastating war, political repression as well as cultural efflorescence, economic vitality as well as crushing famine. Among the topics examined are colonial collaboration and resistance, Korea in the Cold War order, ethnic nationalism, postwar industrial and economic reforms, and the global consumption of Korean culture. These topics will be examined through a wide range of sources (including films, memoirs, diaries, art, and scholarly assessments) that reflect the diversity of experiences of Koreans across social, class, and regional lines.
HISTORY (W21)182  CULTR,MONY&GLOBLZTNLE VINE, M.
This course examines the fundamental dynamics of cultural production and consumption under conditions of globalization. Rather than focus on jargony post-modern scholarly analyses of culture (although we'll read some of that too), we will attempt whenever possible to examine the sources ourselves--particularly music, film, literature and architecture--and develop our own hypotheses about how crucial issues, such as identity (race, gender, ethnicity, religion) power, politics and economics are inflected by and impact the production and consumption of culture during the last two decades.
HISTORY (W21)183  CAPT COOK'S VOYAGESSEED, P./MARCUS, G.
This course traces the three famous voyages of Captain Cook in the Pacific Ocean during the later 18th century. Through his contacts with diverse island peoples we provide a perspective on how islands came to be occupied through technologies of sailing and navigation, how these people formed their own cultures, and how ocean and island ecologies affect their character even up to the present day.
HISTORY (W21)184  EARLY MOD EMPIRESPATEL, A.
No detailed description available.
HISTORY (W21)190  WOMEN&GENDER CHINAGUO, Q.
This is reading seminar designed for upper-division students. It will focus on recent scholarship (mostly monographic writings) on the history of women and sexuality in late imperial/early modern China. The seminar participants will take turns in leading the class discussions. You are not expected to lead the entire session for three hours, but you should prepare a set of discussion questions related to the readings for the week you have chosen to lead. Starting from the second week, the discussion questions should be distributed via email to every seminar participant one day before the class meets.

Participants will write one book review (4-5 pages) and a term paper of roughly ten pages in length.

The term paper, due on the Wednesday of the finals week, should be a historiography essay on one of the topics covered in the seminar (or at least loosely related to the course). You may choose any topic you wish, but the essay should be a critically imaginative piece that reflects your own view of the topic you have decided to present, and of the historical scholarship—with its accomplishments and failings—so far devoted to that subject. Obviously, you need to go beyond the materials assigned in class in order to make such a scholarly assessment. I will be ready to discuss the selection of the topic beforehand with you, especially after the first book review is completed. In many cases, the topic will quite simply be one of those you have taken on as the discussant to report to the seminar.
HISTORY (W21)190  ISLAM,RACE&ATLANTICMILLER, R.
This course explores the construction of racial and religious identities in the Atlantic World. We will consider how centering the experiences of Black Muslims can help us better understand the processes by which the multiethnic Muslim American community has been racialized in historical and contemporary contexts. We will begin with a discussion of premodern notions of ethnic difference and how the emergence of an Atlantic World economy characterized by the trans-Atlantic slave trade gave rise to new forms of racialization. We will consider the alternative geographies and political solidarities associated with Islam’s growing popularity among Black Americans during the twentieth century, as well as the contestations of Black American intellectuals who challenged the compatibility of Islam with Black American cultural sensibilities and political interests. We will close with a discussion of more recent Muslim immigrant communities and consider how the racialization of Muslims has changed in the post 9-11 context. 
HISTORY (W21)190  EDU TIMES OF CRISISMALCZEWSKI, J.
No detailed description available.
HISTORY (W21)193  ADV RESEARCH SEM IBAUM, E.
This advanced research seminar for History majors focuses on the close reading of texts, the mechanics of writing various forms of history, archival and online research techniques, research topic development, and how to structure a meaningful research proposal.  By the end of Winter quarter each student will complete a well-grounded project proposal; in Spring quarter (History 194) students will complete their archival research and article-length essay suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed history journal.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.
Restriction: History majors only. Upper-division students only.
Contact Undergraduate Program Coordinator, Michelle Spivey, at spiveym@uci.edu regarding application.
HISTORY (W21)197  HISTORY INTERNSHIPCHATURVEDI, V.
Students learn to “do history” by working with professionals who work as public historians in settings other than the formal classroom.
“Doing history” does not mean memorizing past events but involves research, critical  reading, analysis, and presentation of material. This internship program allows students to “do history” in public settings and in dialog with public audiences. It will improve students’ abilities to research and analyze historical questions and then to communicate them effectively in oral, visual, and written forms.
Students will select an internship from several partners with which the History Department collaborates.  They will each work in this partner institution with professionals who may be archivists, researchers, teachers, project advisers, or exhibit curators.  They will also participate in weekly on-campus workshops, where they will interact with their peer group to reflect on the kinds of histories being produced in their internship experience and thereby to deepen their understanding of historical analysis and modes of historical presentation.

This course is for elective credit only and does not satisfy a major requirement.
Contact Undergraduate Program Coordinator, Michelle Spivey, at spiveym@uci.edu regarding application.