Krieger Hall
Term:  

Winter Quarter

Dept Course No and Title Instructor
HISTORY (W21)200  MATERIALIST&RELATEDJAMES, W.
No detailed description available.
HISTORY (W21)202A  1ST YEAR RESRCH SEMLEHMANN, M.
TEST
HISTORY (W21)204A  2ND YEAR RESRCH SEMFEDMAN, D.
No detailed description available.
HISTORY (W21)230  EUROPE AND ISLAMCOLLER, I.
Europe & Islam 1500-1900: Orientalism & Entanglement
Edward Said famously asserted that the Islamic “East” was an artefact of Western fantasies and colonial power relations. But in 1500, the imbalance of power lay with the great Muslim empires, as the Ottomans expanded relentlessly into the Mediterranean region. The relationship between early modern Europe and Islam came to define both in fundamental ways. In 1500, Europe was still emerging from the Crusades and the Black Death, under the shadow of the vast and expanding Ottoman Empire. By 1900, it was European empires that had pushed back Ottoman borders in Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North Africa, as new national and anticolonial movements emerged in resistance. “Europe” and “Islam” cannot be disentangled as separate entities: they have always occupied overlapping spaces, as they do today. The notion of “orientalism” that Said pioneered needs to be historicized in order to understand the specific ways in which discursive constructions of difference and sameness were mobilized across this period. This class will explore new accounts of European, Middle Eastern and transregional history with an accent on religion, race, gender and climate in order to disrupt and reimagine our understandings of Orientalism and the ostensible polarities of east and west.
HISTORY (W21)260  20TH CENTURY USHIGHSMITH, A.
This graduate seminar offers an introduction to the history and historiography of the United States in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The course explores key themes, debates, interpretations, and modes of historical inquiry in the field of modern U.S. history with particular emphases on race, gender, sexuality, and political economy. Students are required to read approximately one book and one scholarly article per week, engage in thoughtful discussions of course materials, and complete several written assignments, including a final historiographical paper on a topic of their choosing.
HISTORY (W21)290  EUROPE AND ISLAMCOLLER, I.
Europe & Islam 1500-1900: Orientalism & Entanglement
Edward Said famously asserted that the Islamic “East” was an artefact of Western fantasies and colonial power relations. But in 1500, the imbalance of power lay with the great Muslim empires, as the Ottomans expanded relentlessly into the Mediterranean region. The relationship between early modern Europe and Islam came to define both in fundamental ways. In 1500, Europe was still emerging from the Crusades and the Black Death, under the shadow of the vast and expanding Ottoman Empire. By 1900, it was European empires that had pushed back Ottoman borders in Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North Africa, as new national and anticolonial movements emerged in resistance. “Europe” and “Islam” cannot be disentangled as separate entities: they have always occupied overlapping spaces, as they do today. The notion of “orientalism” that Said pioneered needs to be historicized in order to understand the specific ways in which discursive constructions of difference and sameness were mobilized across this period. This class will explore new accounts of European, Middle Eastern and transregional history with an accent on religion, race, gender and climate in order to disrupt and reimagine our understandings of Orientalism and the ostensible polarities of east and west.
HISTORY (W21)298  EXPER GROUP STUDYBERBERIAN, H.
No detailed description available.