Diversity and Inclusivity

UCI MAP

UCI MAP Chapter Lead Representative: Simona Capisani scapisan@uci.edu

MAP is a collection of students in English-speaking philosophy departments that aims to examine and address issues of minority participation in academic philosophy. Though primarily led by graduate students, MAP also relies on faculty support and encourages undergraduate participation. Though the format of MAP varies from school to school, each chapter aims broadly at addressing (a) minority issues in the profession, (b) theoretical issues regarding philosophy of gender, race, sexual orientation, class, disability, native language, etc, and (c) philosophy done from minority perspectives.

Through MAP's network, students can exchange ideas on topics related to minorities and philosophy, meet and support peers, and learn from other philosophy departments. MAP chapters can choose to provide their respective departments with regular feedback on the department climate. Once a year, representatives from each participating school meet to discuss their chapter's progress.

The UCI MAP Chapter is comprised of graduate students from the UCI Department of Philosophy and UCI Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science. The chapter has focused on issues such as inclusive pedagogy, equity and “diversity” training, pipeline issues, and gender discrimination. Notable contributions developed by the chapter include: the organization of a Southern California Coalition of MAP chapters (current participants include: UCI, USC, UCLA, UCSD, UCSB, UCR) and a conference “Perspectives on Gender” co-sponsored with they UCI Hypatia Society. UCI MAP chapter members have also contributed to the development of the TH!NK Program- a program that connects UCI graduate philosophy students with 5th grade students at local elementary schools with the aim of introducing young people to philosophical thought and discourse, develop critical thinking skills through philosophical discussion, and introduce young students from traditionally under-represented groups to philosophers working toward the advancement of such groups in the discipline.