French Studies
Term:    Level:  

Fall Quarter

Dept Course No and Title Instructor
FRENCH (F19)1A  FUNDAMENTALSSTAFF
Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Students develop an awareness of and sensibility to French and Francophone life and culture through reading, film, the media, and class discussion. Classes are conducted in French.
FRENCH (F19)1A  FUNDAMENTALSSTAFF
Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Students develop an awareness of and sensibility to French and Francophone life and culture through reading, film, the media, and class discussion. Classes are conducted in French.
FRENCH (F19)1A  FUNDAMENTALSSTAFF
Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Students develop an awareness of and sensibility to French and Francophone life and culture through reading, film, the media, and class discussion. Classes are conducted in French.
FRENCH (F19)1A  FUNDAMENTALSSTAFF
Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Students develop an awareness of and sensibility to French and Francophone life and culture through reading, film, the media, and class discussion. Classes are conducted in French.
FRENCH (F19)1A  FUNDAMENTALSSTAFF
Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Students develop an awareness of and sensibility to French and Francophone life and culture through reading, film, the media, and class discussion. Classes are conducted in French.
FRENCH (F19)1A  FUNDAMENTALSSTAFF
Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Students develop an awareness of and sensibility to French and Francophone life and culture through reading, film, the media, and class discussion. Classes are conducted in French.
FRENCH (F19)2A  INTERMEDIATESTAFF
French and Francophone texts of contemporary literary or social interest, films, art, and the media provide the focus for more advanced conversation, reading, and composition. Classes are conducted entirely in French. Prerequisite: normally three years of high school French or one year of college French.
FRENCH (F19)2A  INTERMEDIATESTAFF
French and Francophone texts of contemporary literary or social interest, films, art, and the media provide the focus for more advanced conversation, reading, and composition. Classes are conducted entirely in French. Prerequisite: normally three years of high school French or one year of college French.
FRENCH (F19)2A  INTERMEDIATESTAFF
French and Francophone texts of contemporary literary or social interest, films, art, and the media provide the focus for more advanced conversation, reading, and composition. Classes are conducted entirely in French. Prerequisite: normally three years of high school French or one year of college French.
FRENCH (F19)50  LANGUAGE OF LOVEFARBMAN, H.
This course will consider some particularly influential representations of love in French literature, film, and theory. We will pay special attention to French reflections on the complex relationship between love and language—between the “real thing” and talk about it. Reading and viewing will include classic works by Prévost, Flaubert, Bédier, Chabrol, Renoir, Barthes, Girard, and Denis de Rougemont.
FRENCH (F19)117  FRENCH THEATERVAN DEN ABBEELE, G.
An overview of the French Seventeenth Century, focusing on the art, theatre, literature and philosophy surrounding the court of the "Sun King," Louis XIV.  Readings from Descartes, Pascal, Molière, Corneille, Perrault, La Fontaine and Mme de Lafayette.
FRENCH (F19)150  EDGE OF THE SEAFARBMAN, H.
The border of land and sea is a key scene of climate change. Slight changes at this margin have large consequences. Indeed, if the largeness of the consequences is hard to fathom, this may be partly because the changes are so slight when measured against the vastness of the ocean. Even in the age now commonly called “the anthropocene,” when capitalist production fundamentally alters the ocean’s basic conditions, threatening all of the life forms it supports, the ocean remains in some part unfathomable. This course gathers literary and visual resources for thinking about climate change from the point of view of the edge of the still unfathomable ocean, which remains strangely stable, even in the worst-case scenarios. Reading and viewing will include Native American, ancient Near Eastern, and ancient Greek flood myths; historical writing by Michelet; fictional writing by Jules Verne; nature writing by Rachel Carson; theoretical writing and photography by Alan Sekula; selected surrealist and proto-surrealist poems; selected early cinematic representations (Williamson, Marey, and Méliès); selected later cinematic representations (The Endless Summer, The Big Blue, and an ocean disaster movie tbd); and selected televisual and journalistic representations of recent disasters. This is a lot, but care will be taken to keep reading and viewing assignments manageable, partly in order to open up time and space for exercises in viewing and writing about the coastal environment of Orange and Los Angeles counties. The course will be taught entirely in English, but, upon agreement with the instructor, French majors who do the writing and the relevant reading in French may count the course as taken in French.