European Studies

Term:

Encounters with the Non-European World

Fall Quarter (F19)

Dept/Description Course No., Title  Instructor
AFAM (F19)134A  CARIB HISTORY IJAMES, W.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

Exploration of the history of the archipelago from pre-Columbian times to the end of slavery; examining the impact of European colonization, decimation of the indigenous populations, African slavery, resistance and emancipation; the unity and diversity of experience in region.
Days: TU TH  02:00-03:20 PM

ARABIC (F19)51  INTRO TO THE KORANMANIAR, R.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

An introduction to understanding the Koran and its significance to Muslim life, culture, and history. An overview of scholarly traditions related to the Koran, and its critics. Close readings of the Koran in English translation.
Days: TU TH  09:30-10:50 AM

ART HIS (F19)155A  ANCIENT INDIAPATEL, A.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

This course will examine the visual history of the region defined as ‘India’ today, but necessarily encompassing parts of modern Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, and eastern Afghanistan. After an introduction to the Indus Valley Civilization (2700-1500 BCE), we will explore the legacies of Alexander the Great's campaigns to the edges of India and their impact on the Buddhist art and architecture of the Indian subcontinent. We will also examine the inverse dispersal of Buddhist and Hindu iconographies both eastward and westward in Asia. The course will culminate with the supposed Golden Age of the Gupta empire and its far-reaching legacies from Iran to China. No prerequisite.
Days: TU TH  12:30-01:50 PM

ART HIS (F19)155D  SOUTH ASIAN PHOTOPATEL, A.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

This course will explore the intervention of photography as a technology in the visual culture of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka) in the mid-19th century. Almost upon its emergence in France and/or Britain in the 1840s, photography was taken up in colonial South Asia by both European and Indian practitioners. The course will begin with the "indigenous" early modern visual culture of South Asia, including painting and other depictive arts from the 17th-18th centuries. It will go on to analyze the new visualities of the 19th century, both in photography and the ongoing practices of painting and other arts. Ultimately, the course will chart the shifting realities of the 19th and 20th centuries, highlighting local contributions along with non-local, imported notions to the creation of modernity.
Days: TU TH  02:00-03:20 PM

ART HIS (F19)156  ART & GLOBALIZATIONWINTHER-TAMAKI, B.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

This course focuses on globalization and modern art in India, Japan, and Mexico. The comparison of these three regions demonstrates how globalization impacted the character of art and culture in the modern world. Topics of study include iconic women artists like Frida Kahlo and Kusama Yayoi; symbolic national government buildings in Tokyo, Mexico City, and New Delhi; the transplantation of European art; reviving and creating native traditions; worlds fairs and biennials; and the transnational avant-garde.
Days: TU TH  09:30-10:50 AM

ART HIS (F19)42E  PERSIA EGYPT MSPTMACANEPA, M.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

Art and Archaeology of Ancient Persia, Egypt and Mesopotamia. This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture and archaeology of the ancient Near East, including the Iranian Plateau, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Egypt and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 12,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region. No background in the time period or discipline is expected and therefore this class will also serve as an introduction to the disciplines of art history and archaeology. In this way, the course instructs students how to think and work like historians of art, not simply absorb the discipline’s accepted wisdom. A number of art historical and archaeological methodologies will be introduced in order to give the student a background into how the fields developed and to begin to equip them with the tools to engage the material and scholarly literature of the field.
Days: TU TH  05:00-06:20 PM

GLBL ME (F19)132B  MODERN MIDDLE EASTLEVINE, M.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

HISTORY 132B

This course offers a survey of the history of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) from the nineteenth century till the 1967 war. It starts with a historical and geographic background of the region and proceeds chronologically focusing on the history of the MENA, from Morocco in the West through to Iran in the East, and including the Arab world, Israel, and Turkey along the way. Throughout the semester we will concentrate on some major themes that will tie together the different areas under study, e.g. colonialism and anti-colonial struggle, the rise and consolidation of state power, changing gender relations, and the rise of new socio-economic groups with the attendant rise of new forms of acquiring and accumulating wealth, and new ways of expressing group identity (e.g. local patriotism, Arab nationalism, Islamism, globalization). As important, we will examine how developments in Islamic social and political thought impacted and were influenced by the larger history we examine. Throughout the course, the stress will be on how to put these developments in their respective historical contexts and also to view them using the analytical themes mentioned above.

Fulfills Category I, II, or III.

Days:   12:00-12:00 AM

GLBL ME (F19)179  ARAB UPRISINGSPETROVIC, B.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

SOC SCI 189 / INTL STD 179 / POLI SCI 149

In late 2010 and early 2011, a chain of popular uprisings shook North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The authoritarian rulers of regimes until recently thought stable were forced from power in Tunisia and Egypt. Other countries throughout the region experienced massive protests as well, resulting in diverse outcomes, ranging from timid reforms to restoration of authoritarian rule to civil wars. This course will explore the cultural, geopolitical, and socioeconomic forces that set the stage for the so-called Arab Spring. It will then examine the experience of democratization from Central and East Europe to Latin America, Asia and Africa to help inform our understanding of the challenges and opportunities facing contemporary movements in the Middle East. 

Fulfills Category II. 


Days:   12:00-12:00 AM

GLBLCLT (F19)179  ARAB UPRISINGSPETROVIC, B.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

Studies in selected areas of international studies. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.
Days: TTH  02:00-03:20 PM

HISTORY (F19)132B  MODERN MIDDLE EASTLE VINE, M.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

This course offers a survey of the history of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) from the nineteenth century till the 1967 war. It starts with a historical and geographic background of the region and proceeds chronologically focusing on the history of the MENA, from Morocco in the West through to Iran in the East, and including the Arab world, Israel, and Turkey along the way. Throughout the semester we will concentrate on some major themes that will tie together the different areas under study, e.g. colonialism and anti-colonial struggle, the rise and consolidation of state power, changing gender relations, and the rise of new socio-economic groups with the attendant rise of new forms of acquiring and accumulating wealth, and new ways of expressing group identity (e.g. local patriotism, Arab nationalism, Islamism, globalization). As important, we will examine how developments in Islamic social and political thought impacted and were influenced by the larger history we examine. Throughout the course, the stress will be on how to put these developments in their respective historical contexts and also to view them using the analytical themes mentioned above.
Days: MO WE  08:00-09:20 AM

HISTORY (F19)132D  ARMENIANS ANC/EARLYBERBERIAN, H.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

History 132D explores the history of Armenia and Armenians from ethnogenesis to the early modern period at the end of the 1700s within a regional and global context, which takes into account interactions and encounters with the empires and peoples that encompassed their orbit. It focuses on a number of key moments in the Armenian past that are crucial to understanding contemporary Armenian culture, identity, and memory: the politics of national identity and “ethnogenesis,” conversion to Christianity, invention of the Armenian script, the battle of Vardanank, the development of the global Armenian diaspora, print culture, national revival, early liberation movements, as well as relations between Armenians and their neighbors: Persians, Romans, Muslims, and others.
Days: MO WE  09:30-10:50 AM

HISTORY (F19)164A  CARIB HISTORY IJAMES, W.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

Exploration of the history of the archipelago from pre-Columbian times to the end of slavery; examining the impact of European colonization, decimation of the indigenous populations, African slavery, resistance and emancipation; the unity and diversity of experience in region.
Days: TU TH  02:00-03:20 PM

REL STD (F19)179  ARAB UPRISINGSPETROVIC, B.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

Category III - Thematic Approaches to Religion

In late 2010 and early 2011, a chain of popular uprisings shook North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The authoritarian rulers of regimes until recently thought stable were forced from power in Tunisia and Egypt. Other countries throughout the region experienced massive protests as well, resulting in diverse outcomes, ranging from timid reforms to restoration of authoritarian rule to civil wars. This course will explore the cultural, geopolitical, and socioeconomic forces that set the stage for the so-called Arab Spring. It will then examine the experience of democratization from Central and East Europe to Latin America, Asia and Africa to help inform our understanding of the challenges and opportunities facing contemporary movements in the Middle East.

(same as 67375 Pol Sci 149, Lec A;   and 71060 Soc Sci 189, Lec A)
Days:   12:00-12:00 AM