European Studies

In addition to the European Studies (EURO ST) course offerings and quarterly approved courses, please check the list of General Approved Courses that may be taken for the emphases in the European Studies major.

Term:  

European Studies courses and non-Humanities courses approved for European Studies emphases this quarter

Fall Quarter (F19)

Dept Course No., Title   Instructor
EURO ST (F19)10  EUROPE & MODERNITYSHEMEK, D.

Today we hear much debate about the value of a humanistic education. What is a humanistic education, and where did the idea of the humanities come from? Who counts as human? Are all humans equal? And where does the natural world fit into our ideas about humanity? This course will focus on the emergence of “humanistic studies,” a key innovation in the formation of European Renaissance culture. Beginning in the fourteenth century, writers and artists who embraced something they called the studia humanitatis began to explore—and to champion—the uniqueness of human individuals. We see this pattern in literary works that probe individual psychology, in portraiture that aims to convey individual “interiority,” in changing family attitudes toward children, and especially in the idea of the multifaceted, individual, scientific and artistic genius: the “Renaissance man.” We will study how these humanists took ideas from Classical Greece and Rome to elaborate not only new practices, but also a new educational program—the humanities—that was dedicated to individual critical inquiry, creative recreation, experimentation, and learning from the past. We will be exploring how changes in early modern society, economic organization, and political culture accompanied these developments, and will extend our discussions to consider the rise of the modern university and the changing  landscape on which college students and teachers operate today. Our task will be both to learn about the roots of many of our current assumptions about education, and to measure our distance from that historical past.
Days: TU TH  11:00-12:20 PM

EURO ST (F19)102  MEDEA THRU THE AGESGIANNOPOULOU, Z.

This course on re-imagining the classics will explore how and why the classics have been retold, reformed, invoked, reinterpreted, and received from antiquity to the present day. We will use the mythological figure of Medea as our case study. Beginning with some theoretical orientation and reading Euripides’ Medea, we will survey the various literary versions of the myth in Roman literature. In the latter part of the course, we will turn to Medea’s place in modern and contemporary literature, theater, and film. While discussing the various reinterpretations and reinventions of Medea, we will remain mindful of issues of intertextuality. How for instance, do later versions of the myth engage with and prefigure earlier works? How might contemporary media reflect upon and suggest new meanings for their classical source texts? The methods and approaches used in this course should provide a model with which to approach other mythological, literary, aesthetic, and philosophical topics in classics and beyond.
Days: MO WE  12:00-01:20 PM

EURO ST (F19)103  LANG & CULTRLEVINE, G.

A Germanic language with elements from Hebrew and Aramaic, several Slavic languages, and even Latin, Yiddish was the primary home language of the majority of Europe’s Jews for many centuries. It was and is a language without a country which united Jews from disparate parts of Europe and other places in the world, but which at the same time served as a flashpoint of tensions both within communities of speakers as well as between Jews and non-Jews. In this course, we will learn about the history of the language from its origins in medieval German lands to the present day. Most of the course will focus on its cultural flourishing throughout Eastern Europe from the late eighteenth through the mid-twentieth centuries, and we’ll end by examining its status today as a minority language in need of curation and dependent on efforts at revitalization. We will also explore its rich culture through literature, film, theatre plays, and other cultural products. This course is thus part historical-linguistic and sociolinguistic study, part literature and film seminar, and part cultural history. In each segment we will consider critical issues such as the relationship between language and identity, language and religion, and the ways that the language both indexed as well as manifested social-class and gender divisions within the Yiddish-speaking world, and the ways various cultural products and practices served to expose, engage with, or mitigate tensions between Jews and non-Jews.

The format of the course is a combination of lecture and seminar, with students working on quarter-long research projects in one of the areas under consideration: linguistics, prose literature, poetry, folklore, music, film, theatre, print news. The project asks students to make use of primary documents or artifacts, carry out background research, prepare several brief class presentations, and write a short research paper.

The course is taught entirely in English. No knowledge of Yiddish or German is necessary.
Days: TU TH  11:00-12:20 PM

Other Humanities courses approved for European Studies emphases this quarter

Fall Quarter (F19)

Dept/Description Course No., Title  Instructor
AFAM (F19)134A  CARIB HISTORY IJAMES, W.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

Exploration of the history of the archipelago from pre-Columbian times to the end of slavery; examining the impact of European colonization, decimation of the indigenous populations, African slavery, resistance and emancipation; the unity and diversity of experience in region.
Days: TU TH  02:00-03:20 PM

ARABIC (F19)51  INTRO TO THE KORANMANIAR, R.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

An introduction to understanding the Koran and its significance to Muslim life, culture, and history. An overview of scholarly traditions related to the Koran, and its critics. Close readings of the Koran in English translation.
Days: TU TH  09:30-10:50 AM

ART HIS (F19)155A  ANCIENT INDIAPATEL, A.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

This course will examine the visual history of the region defined as ‘India’ today, but necessarily encompassing parts of modern Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, and eastern Afghanistan. After an introduction to the Indus Valley Civilization (2700-1500 BCE), we will explore the legacies of Alexander the Great's campaigns to the edges of India and their impact on the Buddhist art and architecture of the Indian subcontinent. We will also examine the inverse dispersal of Buddhist and Hindu iconographies both eastward and westward in Asia. The course will culminate with the supposed Golden Age of the Gupta empire and its far-reaching legacies from Iran to China. No prerequisite.
Days: TU TH  12:30-01:50 PM

ART HIS (F19)155D  SOUTH ASIAN PHOTOPATEL, A.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

This course will explore the intervention of photography as a technology in the visual culture of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka) in the mid-19th century. Almost upon its emergence in France and/or Britain in the 1840s, photography was taken up in colonial South Asia by both European and Indian practitioners. The course will begin with the "indigenous" early modern visual culture of South Asia, including painting and other depictive arts from the 17th-18th centuries. It will go on to analyze the new visualities of the 19th century, both in photography and the ongoing practices of painting and other arts. Ultimately, the course will chart the shifting realities of the 19th and 20th centuries, highlighting local contributions along with non-local, imported notions to the creation of modernity.
Days: TU TH  02:00-03:20 PM

ART HIS (F19)156  ART & GLOBALIZATIONWINTHER-TAMAKI, B.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

This course focuses on globalization and modern art in India, Japan, and Mexico. The comparison of these three regions demonstrates how globalization impacted the character of art and culture in the modern world. Topics of study include iconic women artists like Frida Kahlo and Kusama Yayoi; symbolic national government buildings in Tokyo, Mexico City, and New Delhi; the transplantation of European art; reviving and creating native traditions; worlds fairs and biennials; and the transnational avant-garde.
Days: TU TH  09:30-10:50 AM

ART HIS (F19)40B  EUROPE:MEDIEVL &RENMASSEY, L.

AH 40B (Western Art of the Middle Ages and Renaissance) focuses on the long period that extends from the end of the Western Roman Empire in the fifth century through the sixteenth century. There are no prerequisites for the course and no expectations that students will necessarily have taken Art History 40A. Less a survey than a series of case studies, this course looks at colossal statues of emperors, miracle working icons, gem encrusted reliquaries, Gothic cathedrals, the eye-tricking illusions of Renaissance painters, the first nude statues in the West since antiquity, Michelangelo’s paintings in the Sistine Chapel, and Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa. In looking at these things, we will trace the emergence of European visual culture, its dialogue with other cultures, the questioning of the nature and validity of representation within that culture — especially the representation of the human body — and the gradual eclipse of the sacred icon by the secular, modern work of art during the Renaissance.
Days: MO WE  10:00-10:50 AM

ART HIS (F19)42E  PERSIA EGYPT MSPTMACANEPA, M.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

Art and Archaeology of Ancient Persia, Egypt and Mesopotamia. This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture and archaeology of the ancient Near East, including the Iranian Plateau, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Egypt and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 12,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region. No background in the time period or discipline is expected and therefore this class will also serve as an introduction to the disciplines of art history and archaeology. In this way, the course instructs students how to think and work like historians of art, not simply absorb the discipline’s accepted wisdom. A number of art historical and archaeological methodologies will be introduced in order to give the student a background into how the fields developed and to begin to equip them with the tools to engage the material and scholarly literature of the field.
Days: TU TH  05:00-06:20 PM

CLASSIC (F19)37A  EARLY ROMESNYDER, R.
Emphasis/Category: The Mediterranean World: Past & Present

A survey of the development of Roman civilization from its eighth century BCE beginnings to the civil wars of the first century BCE. Examines political and social history, as well as literature, art, architecture, and religion.
Days: MO WE  11:00-11:50 AM

COM LIT (F19)60A  WORLD LITERATURENEWMAN, J.
Emphasis/Category: Early Modern (1450-1789), Modern Europe (1798-)

People call movies like Avatar (dir. James Cameron) (2009) “epics.” Do post-modern movies like Avatar mimic the ancient Greek poet Homer’s pre-modern epic, the Odyssey? What can we learn about any nation’s interests and concerns today from its engagement with the masterpieces of either its own tradition or with other traditions from a different time and place? How do the world’s literatures circulate around the globe? In Comparative Literature 60A, we will read some of the greatest texts of World Literature – from the ancient Greek, Argentine, English, French-Caribbean, German, Irish, Nigerian, Persian, and U.S. traditions – in dialogue with one another as a way of answering these questions. Texts will include the poems of the 14th century Persian poet and mystic Hafiz in various translations and as they were read by the 19th century German author Johann Wolfgang von Goethe; the Persian poet Firdowsi’s 10th century epic, the Shahnameh, and its afterlife in miniature illustrations, oral recitations in coffee houses, and re-significations as Iran’s national epic; the British medieval poet Geoffrey Chaucer’s 14th century Canterbury Tales as they have been taken up by the British-Nigerian rapper and performance artist Patience Agbabi (b. 1965); the ancient Greek tragedian Sophocles’ Antigone (442 b.c.e.) as it is retold in Argentine playwright Griselda Gambaro’s Antígona Furiosa play (1986); Sophocles’ Philoctetes (409 b.c.e.) as it dialogues with Irish playwright Seamus Heaney’s The Cure at Troy (1990 /1991) and the U.S poet Adrienne Rich’s “Twenty One Love Poems” (1974-76);  Euripides’ Bacchae (405 b.c.e.) in conversation with Nigerian playwright Wole Soyinka’s The Bacchae of Euripides: A Communion Rite (1973), and Shakespeare’s Tempest (1611) in dialogue with French Caribbean writer Aimé Césaire’s A Tempest (1969) and as it was performed by inmates at the Luther Luckett Correctional  Complex in La Grange, Kentucky, in 2005.  - These dialogues will help us understand the many ways that the traditions we study can have multiple afterlives across traditions and around the world.

Comparative Literature 60A is the first quarter of the “World Literature” track in the Comp. Lit. major, but the course is open to all students. It fulfills the GE IV and VIII campus-wide requirements.

Requirements for this course include: Doing the assigned readings, watching the lecture videos, watching supplemental (not optional) videos, Quizzes, Discussion Board posts on the readings, and Workshop Exercises on the readings. There is no midterm and no final in this course.
Days:   12:00-12:00 AM

ENGLISH (F19)105  TRANSNATIONALISM: RACE, GENDER, SEXUALITYRADHAKRISHNAN, R.
Emphasis/Category: Modern Europe (1798-)

Is the nation form adequate as a category or as a mode of explanation during times of volatile movement, globalization, migration, diasporic flows, and hybrid configurations of culture, labor, and capital?  A long time ago Virginia Woolf proclaimed that a woman knows no country. Race and ethnicity and sexuality too transcend the sovereignty of the nation state. The human condition clearly surpasses the boundedness of nationalism, and yet the dominant grammar of contemporary political organization continues to be nation-centric. Walls are being built to keep the dangerous foreigner out even as the meaning of what it means to be human is parsed within the straitjacket of citizenship. Has the nation then been transcended only in theory, but not in practice?  Is there a radical disjunction between political consciousness and cultural and literary and aesthetic awareness? 

The purpose of this course is to explore the contours of TRANSNATIONALISM by way of texts both theoretical and literary.  Race, gender, the diaspora, and sexuality have been powerful forces that have demonstrated the poverty as well as the hypocrisy of nationalism, anchored as it often is on principles of exclusion, discrimination, and racialization. But on the other hand, nationalism has operated as an instrument of decolonization in the so called Third World. Are there then good and bad nationalisms; and correspondingly, are there good and bad examples of TRANSNATIONALISM? Is TRANSNATIONALISM an uneven phenomenon that manifests itself differently in fields such as Economics, Politics, Culture, and Literature? I hope this course will help you all develop a critical perspective on the heterogeneous and contradictory flows and trajectories of what is called TRANSNATIONALISM.

Readings from Literature, theories of Gender and Sexuality, Marxist, African-American, Diasporic, Global, Critical Race and Postcolonial theories.

Lecture and discussion. I short essay 5 pages and 1 long essay 7 pages.
Days: TU TH  12:30-01:50 PM

ENGLISH (F19)106  VICTORIAN REPRESENTATIONHENDERSON, A.
Emphasis/Category: British Studies

In this course we will trace the late-nineteenth-century preoccupation with the workings of representation, focusing on poems and novels that are meditations on their own capacity to figure forth the world.  We will begin by familiarizing ourselves with Romantic theories of representation--theories that confidently root language in nature or the divine order--so as to be able track the Victorian loss of faith in the artist’s capacity to produce symbols that make reference to anything beyond themselves.  Readings will include Dickens’ Our Mutual Friend, Collins’ The Woman in White, and poems by Tennyson, Browning, Swinburne, and Rossetti.  Students will also read several critical articles and lead class discussion on one of them.  The writing for the course will center on the production of one major essay, for which students will produce an annotated bibliography and an outline to share with the class.
Days: TU TH  03:30-04:50 PM

GERMAN (F19)170  YIDDISH LANG & CULTLEVINE, G.
Emphasis/Category: German Studies

A Germanic language with elements from Hebrew and Aramaic, several Slavic languages, and even Latin, Yiddish was the primary home language of the majority of Europe’s Jews for many centuries. It was and is a language without a country which united Jews from disparate parts of Europe and other places in the world, but which at the same time served as a flashpoint of tensions both within communities of speakers as well as between Jews and non-Jews. In this course, we will learn about the history of the language from its origins in medieval German lands to the present day. Most of the course will focus on its cultural flourishing throughout Eastern Europe from the late eighteenth through the mid-twentieth centuries, and we’ll end by examining its status today as a minority language in need of curation and dependent on efforts at revitalization. We will also explore its rich culture through literature, film, theatre plays, and other cultural products. This course is thus part historical-linguistic and sociolinguistic study, part literature and film seminar, and part cultural history. In each segment we will consider critical issues such as the relationship between language and identity, language and religion, and the ways that the language both indexed as well as manifested social-class and gender divisions within the Yiddish-speaking world, and the ways various cultural products and practices served to expose, engage with, or mitigate tensions between Jews and non-Jews.
The format of the course is a combination of lecture and seminar, with students working on quarter-long research projects in one of the areas under consideration: linguistics, prose literature, poetry, folklore, music, film, theatre, print news. The project asks students to make use of primary documents or artifacts, carry out background research, prepare several brief class presentations, and write a short research paper.
The course is taught entirely in English. No knowledge of Yiddish or German is necessary.
Days: TU TH  11:00-12:20 PM

GLBL ME (F19)132B  MODERN MIDDLE EASTLEVINE, M.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

HISTORY 132B

This course offers a survey of the history of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) from the nineteenth century till the 1967 war. It starts with a historical and geographic background of the region and proceeds chronologically focusing on the history of the MENA, from Morocco in the West through to Iran in the East, and including the Arab world, Israel, and Turkey along the way. Throughout the semester we will concentrate on some major themes that will tie together the different areas under study, e.g. colonialism and anti-colonial struggle, the rise and consolidation of state power, changing gender relations, and the rise of new socio-economic groups with the attendant rise of new forms of acquiring and accumulating wealth, and new ways of expressing group identity (e.g. local patriotism, Arab nationalism, Islamism, globalization). As important, we will examine how developments in Islamic social and political thought impacted and were influenced by the larger history we examine. Throughout the course, the stress will be on how to put these developments in their respective historical contexts and also to view them using the analytical themes mentioned above.

Fulfills Category I, II, or III.

Days:   12:00-12:00 AM

GLBL ME (F19)179  DEMOCRACY AND ISLAMPETROVIC, B.
Emphasis/Category: Modern Europe (1798-)

INTL STD 179 / SOC SCI 189

This course aims to address the following questions: Are Islam and Democracy compatible? How is religious interest defined? How are Islamic images and institutions used? What is the historical relationship between Islam and politics? When and under what conditions is Islam publicized and politicized? Is Islam compatible with modernity? Is it possible to be modern and Muslim at the same time? How do Islamic scholars deal with the questions of "difference", democracy, and science? The major task of this course will be to assess how religion makes an impact on politics, state and society and in turn is impacted upon and potentially transformed by society, politics and the state. 

Fulfills Category I. 


Days:   12:00-12:00 AM

GLBL ME (F19)179  ARAB UPRISINGSPETROVIC, B.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

SOC SCI 189 / INTL STD 179 / POLI SCI 149

In late 2010 and early 2011, a chain of popular uprisings shook North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The authoritarian rulers of regimes until recently thought stable were forced from power in Tunisia and Egypt. Other countries throughout the region experienced massive protests as well, resulting in diverse outcomes, ranging from timid reforms to restoration of authoritarian rule to civil wars. This course will explore the cultural, geopolitical, and socioeconomic forces that set the stage for the so-called Arab Spring. It will then examine the experience of democratization from Central and East Europe to Latin America, Asia and Africa to help inform our understanding of the challenges and opportunities facing contemporary movements in the Middle East. 

Fulfills Category II. 


Days:   12:00-12:00 AM

GLBLCLT (F19)179  ARAB UPRISINGSPETROVIC, B.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

Studies in selected areas of international studies. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.
Days: TTH  02:00-03:20 PM

GLBLCLT (F19)179  DEMOCRACY AND ISLAMPETROVIC, B.
Emphasis/Category: Modern Europe (1798-)

Studies in selected areas of international studies. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.
Days: TTH  03:30-04:50 PM

HISTORY (F19)100W  EUROPE & ISLAMCOLLER, I.
HISTORY (F19)132B  MODERN MIDDLE EASTLE VINE, M.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

This course offers a survey of the history of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) from the nineteenth century till the 1967 war. It starts with a historical and geographic background of the region and proceeds chronologically focusing on the history of the MENA, from Morocco in the West through to Iran in the East, and including the Arab world, Israel, and Turkey along the way. Throughout the semester we will concentrate on some major themes that will tie together the different areas under study, e.g. colonialism and anti-colonial struggle, the rise and consolidation of state power, changing gender relations, and the rise of new socio-economic groups with the attendant rise of new forms of acquiring and accumulating wealth, and new ways of expressing group identity (e.g. local patriotism, Arab nationalism, Islamism, globalization). As important, we will examine how developments in Islamic social and political thought impacted and were influenced by the larger history we examine. Throughout the course, the stress will be on how to put these developments in their respective historical contexts and also to view them using the analytical themes mentioned above.
Days: MO WE  08:00-09:20 AM

HISTORY (F19)132D  ARMENIANS ANC/EARLYBERBERIAN, H.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

History 132D explores the history of Armenia and Armenians from ethnogenesis to the early modern period at the end of the 1700s within a regional and global context, which takes into account interactions and encounters with the empires and peoples that encompassed their orbit. It focuses on a number of key moments in the Armenian past that are crucial to understanding contemporary Armenian culture, identity, and memory: the politics of national identity and “ethnogenesis,” conversion to Christianity, invention of the Armenian script, the battle of Vardanank, the development of the global Armenian diaspora, print culture, national revival, early liberation movements, as well as relations between Armenians and their neighbors: Persians, Romans, Muslims, and others.
Days: MO WE  09:30-10:50 AM

HISTORY (F19)164A  CARIB HISTORY IJAMES, W.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

Exploration of the history of the archipelago from pre-Columbian times to the end of slavery; examining the impact of European colonization, decimation of the indigenous populations, African slavery, resistance and emancipation; the unity and diversity of experience in region.
Days: TU TH  02:00-03:20 PM

HISTORY (F19)70B  EUROPEAN QUEENSMCLOUGHLIN, N.
Emphasis/Category: Early Modern (1450-1789)

European Queens served as models of piety for their people. They also often drew the criticism of religious leaders. Some saved dynasties through their shrewd regencies and some were blamed for leading their countries into destructive civil wars. Sent as vulnerable young girls to be peacemakers in foreign lands, they worked as cultural ambassadors between their birth families and their royal husbands. For many, however, their foreign manners and family connections remained suspect. Only by great fortune and with great care could they ever rule independently and in their own name. As exceptional women, they had access to more power than was available to most of their male contemporaries. At the same time they were forced to work tirelessly to protect their own reputations and to build networks of support and loyalty. By studying several queens, including famous queens (like Elizabeth I of England) and infamous queens (like Catherine de Medici), this class will explore what it meant to occupy such a politically charged and exceptional social position and what the realities of queenship tell us how families, royal institutions, religious ideals, and gender worked together to shape European politics from the early Middle Ages through the early modern period.
Days: MO WE  11:00-11:50 AM

LATIN (F19)100  LIVY AND VIRGILSNYDER, R.
Emphasis/Category: The Mediterranean World: Past & Present

Course description coming soon!
Days: MO WE  10:00-10:50 AM

REL STD (F19)100W  EUROPE & ISLAMCOLLER, I.
Emphasis/Category: Modern Europe (1798-)

HSITORY 100W
Enrollment in History 100W will be restricted to History majors until the fee deadline on September 16, 2019.
Lower division writing is required. 

Stay tuned, course description coming soon!

Days:   12:00-12:00 AM

REL STD (F19)179  ARAB UPRISINGSPETROVIC, B.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

Category III - Thematic Approaches to Religion

In late 2010 and early 2011, a chain of popular uprisings shook North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The authoritarian rulers of regimes until recently thought stable were forced from power in Tunisia and Egypt. Other countries throughout the region experienced massive protests as well, resulting in diverse outcomes, ranging from timid reforms to restoration of authoritarian rule to civil wars. This course will explore the cultural, geopolitical, and socioeconomic forces that set the stage for the so-called Arab Spring. It will then examine the experience of democratization from Central and East Europe to Latin America, Asia and Africa to help inform our understanding of the challenges and opportunities facing contemporary movements in the Middle East.

(same as 67375 Pol Sci 149, Lec A;   and 71060 Soc Sci 189, Lec A)
Days:   12:00-12:00 AM

REL STD (F19)179  DEMOCRACY AND ISLAMPETROVIC, B.
Emphasis/Category: Modern Europe (1798-)

Category I (Judaism/Christianity/Islam) or III (Thematic Approaches to Religion) 

This course aims to address the following questions: Are Islam and Democracy compatible? How is religious interest defined? How are Islamic images and institutions used? What is the historical relationship between Islam and politics? When and under what conditions is Islam publicized and politicized? Is Islam compatible with modernity? Is it possible to be modern and Muslim at the same time? How do Islamic scholars deal with the questions of "difference", democracy, and science? The major task of this course will be to assess how religion makes an impact on politics, state and society and in turn is impacted upon and potentially transformed by society, politics and the state.

(same as 71222 Soc Sci 189, Lec H)
Days:   12:00-12:00 AM

Dept/Description Course No., Title Instructor