European Studies

In addition to the European Studies (EURO ST) course offerings and quarterly approved courses, please check the list of General Approved Courses that may be taken for the emphases in the European Studies major.

Term:  

European Studies courses and non-Humanities courses approved for European Studies emphases this quarter

Spring Quarter (S19)

Dept Course No., Title   Instructor
EURO ST (S19)12  WHAT IS THE ORIGIN OF LANGUAGE?PAN, D.

This course will survey a centuries-old debate about whether language was invented by humans on their own or was granted to them. If humans cannot reason without language, how would a human ever be able to invent language? On the other hand, if language were granted to humans as a gift, how would humans be able to receive this gift without already possessing some faculty of reason and thus linguistic ability? In the 18th century, this debate centered around whether humans invented language or whether it was granted by God. In the 20th and 21st centuries, a similar debate considers whether language arose as a spontaneous mutation or as something that was gradually learned. In this course, you will learn methods of symbol-based logic and universal grammar as techniques for understanding the functioning of human language and apply these methods to answer the question of the origin of language. In reading works of philosophy, linguistics, biology, and literature, you will also learn how different disciplines approach the question of the origin of language. This course fulfills two General Education requirements: 1) the GE Vb requirement and 2) your choice of either the GE III or the GE IV requirement.

EURO ST (S19)12  WHAT IS THE ORIGIN OF LANGUAGE?PAN, D.

This course will survey a centuries-old debate about whether language was invented by humans on their own or was granted to them. If humans cannot reason without language, how would a human ever be able to invent language? On the other hand, if language were granted to humans as a gift, how would humans be able to receive this gift without already possessing some faculty of reason and thus linguistic ability? In the 18th century, this debate centered around whether humans invented language or whether it was granted by God. In the 20th and 21st centuries, a similar debate considers whether language arose as a spontaneous mutation or as something that was gradually learned. In this course, you will learn methods of symbol-based logic and universal grammar as techniques for understanding the functioning of human language and apply these methods to answer the question of the origin of language. In reading works of philosophy, linguistics, biology, and literature, you will also learn how different disciplines approach the question of the origin of language. This course fulfills two General Education requirements: 1) the GE Vb requirement and 2) your choice of either the GE III or the GE IV requirement.

EURO ST (S19)101B  TOPICS VARYEVERS, K.

No description is currently available.
Days: Tu Th  02:00-03:20 PM

EURO ST (S19)190W  SENIOR SEMINARNEWMAN, J.

The challenges facing present-day Europe about the economy, unemployment, political nationalism, and immigration policy and facts on the ground resemble our own here in the U.S. today. But there is still the prevailing tendency to represent “Europe” only via caricature and over-simplified cartoons. In the first part of this course, we will consider some of the most common myths associated with Europe’s – and our own – “Eurocentrism” via the study of historical maps and artistic and literary representations, on the one hand, and by investigating the origins of the European Union out of the ashes of World War Two and the crises it faces today, on the other. To what end was “European identity” produced in the first place and how is it being invoked – and challenged – today? In the second half of the course, we will dig below the surface of these and other claims about “European” history, culture (philosophy, literature, film, music), society, and politics (in English, French, German, Italian, Russian, Gaelic, etc., etc., also in its expression in Anglophone, Francophone, Lusophone Africa and the Caribbean) via a series of research assignments on individualized topics developed by the students in consultation with the instructor. On the basis of these assignments, students will have the opportunity to produce a polished research paper. ENROLLMENT IN THIS COURSE IS ONLY BY PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR.
Days: W TH  03:00-04:50 PM

POL SCI (S19)159  EUROPE IN CRISISFINLEY, K

Emphasis/Category: Modern Europe (1798-)
This course exposes students to the politics and policies of the European Union (EU). It begins by introducing students to the EU’s history and different theoretical approaches to explaining how it has evolved. Then, it describes the purpose and functions of the primary institutions of the EU and presents the EU’s key policy instruments. It concludes with a discussion of current crises facing the EU.
Days: T TH  02:00-03:20 PM

Other Humanities courses approved for European Studies emphases this quarter

Spring Quarter (S19)

Dept/Description Course No., Title  Instructor

None Found