European Studies

In addition to the European Studies (EURO ST) course offerings and quarterly approved courses, please check the list of General Approved Courses that may be taken for the emphases in the European Studies major.

Term:  

European Studies courses and non-Humanities courses approved for European Studies emphases this quarter

Fall Quarter (F18)

Dept Course No., Title   Instructor
EURO ST (F18)2 00A  FOUNDATIONS OF EUROPEAN THOUGHT AND CULTUREBIENDARRA, A.

Note: European Studies 200A a graduate course open to undergraduate Juniors and Seniors contingent on instructor permission to add the course.

MOVEMENT AND MIGRATIONS:
As a result of globalization, migration, multiculturalism, and integration are important and politically much discussed concepts in contemporary European debates. Yet they have always been part of the history of Europe and as historical and social phenomena, have shaped European spaces and places. From the religious resettlement of French protestant Huguenots to Berlin-Brandenburg in the seventeenth century to European outward migration to North and South America in the nineteenth century, from post-World War Two labor migration and the flight of refugees from the Middle East and Africa today, migration and integration were always rather the norm than the exception on the European continent. Organized trans-historically and trans-locationally, this course offers select examples and foundational texts to understand some of the patterns, motifs, and manifestations of movement on the European continent. We will analyze the role of the state and discuss nationalism and transnationalism as theoretical and interpretive concepts. Identity and alterity, exile and diaspora are further theoretical notions that will play a role in our investigations. 

EURO ST (F18)10  EUROPE & MODERNITYSMITH, J.

The goal of this course is to explore how processes started in Europe helped shape the modern (western) world we live in today. We will concentrate on the period between roughly 1500 and 1800.  This is the period that includes such developments as the Protestant Reformation, the scientific revolution, the rise of capitalism, the origins of political science, the rise of the nation-state, secularization, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution. We will consider these crucial developments from a variety of perspectives in the social sciences (economics, political theory, sociology) and the humanities (art, literature, music, and philosophy). Topics to be discussed are:
1. Luther, the Reformation, the end of the Middle Ages, the birth of the modern individual (in conscience), and the “spirit of capitalism” in the Protestant work ethic;
2. The rise of science and the mathematization of nature;
3. European encounters with Islam and the Ottoman (Turkish) Empire;
4. The horrors of the Thirty Years’ War and the Age of the Baroque; how the modern system of the nation state and rationalist approaches to God and nature emerged out of the wars of religion;
5. Enlightenment concepts of reason and inherent limits of the Enlightenment project;
6. The French Revolution as a culmination of and challenge to the long history we have studied.
Readings in the course will focus on selections from primary texts.
Grading based on attendance of lectures, short response papers and quizzes on readings, midterm and final exams.

THIS COURSE FULFILLS GE CATEGORIES III or IV, AND VIII


Days: TU TH  11:00-12:20 PM

EURO ST (F18)102  MEDIEVAL TOWNSMCLOUGHLIN, N.

Beginning around the year 1050, medieval Europe experienced a rapid increase in trade, population and urbanization. As more and more people moved from the countryside to trade centers, new towns formed and existing towns outgrew their walls. Town governments evolved and people formed voluntary associations for the purpose of regulating the practice of their trades and/or organizing their religious devotions. This economic, political, and cultural experimentation had a profound affect upon European society as a whole. In this course we will investigate this exciting development in medieval history, paying careful attention to three aspects of medieval urban life: One; what is a medieval town and what caused the rapid increase in urbanization historians have observed for the eleventh and twelfth centuries? Two; what was the range of wealth and poverty in a medieval town and how did medieval townspeople grapple with economic disparities? And Three; what types of urban identities were available to medieval townspeople and what strategies did people employ to confirm their own position and status?
Days: MO WE  10:00-10:50 AM

EURO ST (F18)103  CUSINE AS CULTURLEVINE, G.

In our study of the history and culture of particular peoples or countries, we most often focus on political and historical events, such as wars, monarchial reigns, or on aspects of social, political and economic change. We also investigate cultural artifacts created by a people, such as music, the visual arts, and literature. Food and the act of nourishing the body are considered by many to be so fundamental that they require no conscious reflection or consideration, that they are somehow independent of culture or history, or perhaps just the (by-)products of those. With a focus on the regions and countries of Europe, in this course we will explore the many ways that culinary culture both relates to, reflects, and in fact manifests historical events, cultural norms, cultural identities, and belief and value systems. Though our primary focus will be on the period from the early modern period to the present, we’ll begin in the medieval period and eat our way through the centuries, stopping at various stations to consider how food and drink, the acts of eating and drinking, and of course the production and preparation of food and drink, related to the many wars in Europe, the maintenance or subversion of social systems, and the regulation of social roles, such as those of men and women, rich and poor etc.

At the end of this course you should have a broad-based knowledge of the history of food and food culture in (primarily western and central) Europe, and you should have become a critical analyst and consumer of food in its relationships to culture and historical events. In the process of our culinary investigation, you’ll also become comfortably familiar with many traditional dishes and culinary traditions of France, Germany, Austrian, Britain, Spain, Italy, and other European countries.

COURSE MATERIALS
1. Flandrin, Jean Louis, and Montanari, Massimo (Eds.). Food: A Culinary History from Antiquity to the Present (European Perspectives). Penguin Books, 1999/2000.
2. Numerous pdf files, which are chapters and articles on a variety of topics. Each is clickable in the online Canvas site (course participants only). The readings include theoretical texts on foodways and culinary history and culture (e.g. Lévi-Strauss, Bourdieu, Elias, Bakhtin), and secondary literature by historians, anthropologists and sociologists (e.g. Albala, Counihan, Flandrin, Montanari).

Prerequisite: None.

Days: TU TH  02:00-03:20 PM

MUSIC (F18)40b  HISTORY EURPN MUSICREARDON, C.

No description is currently available.

POL SCI (F18)44b  GLOBAL IDEOLOGIESAL-BULUSHI, Y.

No description is currently available.

Other Humanities courses approved for European Studies emphases this quarter

Fall Quarter (F18)

Dept/Description Course No., Title  Instructor
ART HIS (F18)100  IRAN AND IMPERIAL EXCHANGES IN EURASIAN LATE ANTIQUITYCANEPA, M.
Emphasis/Category: Encounters with the Non-European World

This course explores the role of Iran in the visual, material and intellectual exchanges among the great settled, nomadic and mercantile empires of late antiquity (ca. 200-700 CE), a pivotal period of interconnection and transformation in Eurasian history. We will investigate the art, architecture, urbanism and visualities of empire in the settled empires, such as Sasanian Iran, Rome and China, and steppe powers such as the Huns and Türks, as well as smaller states on the peripheries and interstices in Western Europe, Central and South Asia, and Africa enmeshed in these imperial struggles and intrigues. Topics include the growth and competition in images and ideologies of sacred kingship; transformations of Eurasian visual cultures through long distance diplomacy and commerce; magical and astrological practices and lore; and the formation of new liturgical spaces for imperial or universalizing religions such as Christianity, Buddhism, and Iranian religions such as Zoroastrianism and Manichaeism.
Days: TU TH  12:30-01:50 PM

ENGLISH (F18)100  INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY THEORYBARTLETT, J.
Emphasis/Category: British Studies, French Studies, Italian Studies, Modern Europe (1798-)

English 100 has been designed to provide you with a survey of literary theory and criticism from the fifth century B.C.E. to the present day, an ambition that would read like an incredible prank if it were it not so sincerely earned. The University of California, Irvine has a reputation for bleeding-edge approaches to literature and culture that is, frankly, unmatched: ours was the first university in the country to offer a doctoral program in Critical Theory, now an essential component of literary study, and our library houses the most comprehensive Critical Theory Archive in the world, as well as the manuscripts and papers of many of the field’s most significant thinkers. Irvine’s influence on humanistic inquiry is both historic and ongoing, and this course—English 100—represents everything that we are about.

Behind every survey lies a logic of selection, and my choices have been guided by a belief in the prominence and centrality of Worry in the history of literary criticism and theory. Rather than offer a strictly chronological review, I have organized works by their motivating concerns. Each week will feature a mixture of old and new texts that address a common issue, so that you can receive a more discrete and compelling genealogy of critical discourse.

Requirements include a midterm exam, a final exam, and two reading quizzes.
Days: TU TH  11:00-12:20 PM

ENGLISH (F18)102C  THE 1890SBARTLETT, J.
Emphasis/Category: British Studies

In this course we will read a number of works associated with Aestheticism and the Decadence, a period marked by great social, literary, and philosophical ambivalences, including the paradox of the cosmopolitan subject, the circulation of criticism and the exclusivity of the coterie, the aestheticization of the object and the relation between the useful and the beautiful. We will read philosophies of art and culture by John Ruskin, Walter Pater, Vernon Lee, anthropology by W. T. Stead, sociology by Max Nordau, sexology by Havelock Ellis, and psychical research by William James.  Our literary texts will include prose and poetry by Aubrey Beardsley, Max Beerbohm, George Egerton, Henry James, Arthur Machen, H. G. Wells, and Oscar Wilde. Requirements include a midterm, a final paper of 5-7 pages, and a final exam.
Days: TU TH  12:30-01:50 PM

FRENCH (F18)170  POSTWAR GENRESFARBMAN, H
Emphasis/Category: Modern Europe (1798-)

This course will sample some of the exciting new combinations and permutations of prose genres that have emerged in French writing since 1945. Topics will include: the “New Novel”; the récit; hybrid genres; “autofiction;” and the relationship between writing and other media, especially film. Texts by Samuel Beckett, Maurice Blanchot, Marguerite Duras, Alain Robbe-Grillet, Roland Barthes, and Annie Ernaux.
Days: TUTH  03:30-04:50 PM

FRENCH (F18)50  FRANCE & NEW WORLDFARBMAN, H.
Emphasis/Category: French Studies, Modern Europe (1798-), Encounters with the Non-European World

This course will study some key literary, cultural, and political episodes in the relationship between France and the New World, focusing particularly on contact-points in Haiti and what is now the United States. Reading will include texts by Montaigne, Toussaint Louverture, Thomas Jefferson, Chateaubriand, and Tocqueville, along with documents of exploration and revolution. All reading, writing, and discussion will be in English
Days: TU TH  11:00-12:20 PM

HISTORY (F18)100W  HISTORY WRTNG CRAFTKONGSHAUG, E.
Emphasis/Category: Modern Europe (1798-)

"The Craft of History Writing" will emphasize the teaching of "History Writing" from a writer's rather than from a historian's perspective.
Each week we will read one fully-realized historical essay, published in a  contemporary, peer-reviewed historical journal and also one chapter from a book-length historical narrative, The Sea Captain’s Wife: A True Story of Love, Race, and War in the Nineteenth Century, by Martha Hodes.
And each week, through these works (all drawn from US history), we will focus on a  different element of "craft" through which we can approach the different language, argument and research skills necessary to compose a compelling and academically credible essay in historical inquiry.

Your own writing will consist of focused reading responses, in-class exercises, and  two essays. Your first essay, developed from response drafts, will be based on analyzing elements of craft exemplified by two or several of the class readings; the second essay will be devoted to applying these elements to a historical subject/text/period/area of your own choosing/specialization (which need not be drawn from US History); this second essay will be workshopped, substantially revised and resubmitted for a third grade.
Days: TU TH  09:30-10:50 AM

HISTORY (F18)110D  MEDIEVAL TOWNSMCLOUGHLIN, N.
Emphasis/Category: Medieval Studies

Beginning around the year 1050, medieval Europe experienced a rapid increase in trade, population and urbanization. As more and more people moved from the countryside to trade centers, new towns formed and existing towns outgrew their walls. Town governments evolved and people formed voluntary associations for the purpose of regulating the practice of their trades and/or organizing their religious devotions. This economic, political, and cultural experimentation had a profound affect upon European society as a whole. In this course we will investigate this exciting development in medieval history, paying careful attention to three aspects of medieval urban life: One; what is a medieval town and what caused the rapid increase in urbanization historians have observed for the eleventh and twelfth centuries? Two; what was the range of wealth and poverty in a medieval town and how did medieval townspeople grapple with economic disparities? And Three; what types of urban identities were available to medieval townspeople and what strategies did people employ to confirm their own position and status?
  (Satisfies Pre-1800 Requirement)
Days: MO WE  10:00-10:50 AM

HISTORY (F18)160  SEX&CONQUEST LAT AMO'TOOLE, R.
Emphasis/Category: Spanish-Portuguese Studies, Encounters with the Non-European World

How did the Spanish imagine Aztecs and Incas? This course examines the role of sex, gender, and race in how Europeans conquered the Americas. In turn, we will investigate how the Aztecs in Mexico and the Incas in the Andes challenged conquest from the household to the market place and from the battlefield to the bedroom.

The sixteenth-century encounters between Europeans and indigenous peoples of the Americas were riddled with violence and miscommunication as well as negotiation and opportunity. In the first moments of early globalization, Iberians and native Americans defined and defied each other’s gender and racial expectations – to shape past and present identities of Latin Americans.

Throughout the quarter, we will analyze primary texts as well as scholarly books and articles to explore questions such as: How did indigenous women and men participate in the Spanish conquest and colonization of the Americas? Did Catholic evangelization completely silence native beliefs? How did competing ideas of masculinity inform the acts of conquest and resistance throughout Latin America? How did gendered hierarchies as well as new racial categories create the clashes of conquest? How did indigenous and Spanish people clash over definitions of sex and sexuality?

Evaluation will be based on two essays, one midterm exam, and class participation.
(Satisfies pre-1800 Requirement)
Days: TU TH  09:30-10:50 AM

HISTORY (F18)70B  MONSTERS & BORDERSMCLOUGHLIN, N.
Emphasis/Category: Modern Europe (1798-), Encounters with the Non-European World

Problems in History (Europe) provides an introduction to the historical problems, the issues of interpretation, the use of primary sources, and the historical scholarship of the history of Europe with an emphasis on developing skills in historical essay-writing. This particular iteration of History 70B, Monsters and Borders, will focus upon the historical problem of monsters. Monsters (particularly human-animal or human-demon hybrids) of varying types appear regularly in otherwise serious works of European literature, political polemic, and geography written between c. 450 BCE and 1700 CE. In order to better understand the role played by the horrific and fantastic in the unfolding historical events and their recollection, this class will explore how different European communities used the portrayal of monsters to define the boundaries of their communities, understand the unknown, reinterpret the past, promote religious and/or intellectual reform, and establish hierarchical political orders.
(IV, VIII)
(Satisfies Pre-1800 Requirement)
Days: MO WE  11:00-11:50 AM

ITALIAN (F18)150  HOLOCAUST IN ITALYCHIAMPI, J.
Emphasis/Category: Italian Studies, Modern Europe (1798-)

This course will concern itself with the response to the Holocaust in the memoirs of Primo Levi and Liana Millu, and in the fiction of Giorgio Bassani. Framing their writings will be brief readings in the work of historians Liliana Picciotto Fargion, Michele Sarfatti and Susan Zuccotti.

Italy had no native tradition of anti-Semitism to compare with the French or Austrian (Action Française; Karl Lueger’s Christian Social Party). Moreover, the Holocaust in Italy begins comparably late–in 1943 with the overthrow of Mussolini–and continued with the consent of the Republic of Salò, the largely puppet state the Germans set up for him after his rescue. The class will briefly address such historical questions as the relation between Italian Fascism and anti-Semitism, the role and responsibility of the Papacy in the eventual deportations, and, finally, the heroism of Italian individuals and even institutions (the diplomatic corps) in the face of unspeakable atrocity. In Levi and Millu we shall address more literary questions: Italian identity, for example. What did it mean to be an Italian Jew in the camps– hence Sephardic–thus to speak no Yiddish and not to be observant, i.e. to be both culturally and religiously ignorant? On the other hand, what did it mean for an Italian Jew to be cultured and completely assimilated to Italian life: “tutti dottori, tutti avvocati” unlike Austrian, Hungarian and Russian Jews? We will study the development of the identity of the protagonist as s/he struggles to survive in the Italy of the race laws and then in the inconceivable conditions of Auschwitz. Incidentally, according to Liliana Picciotto Fargion, the total number of Jews deported was 8,613 or whom 7,631 died. She adds 291 who were murdered in Italy; this out of approximately 43,000 Jews. All readings are in English.
Days: MO WE  02:00-02:50 PM

RUSSIAN (F18)50  SOVIET ANIMATIONMJOLSNESS, L.
Emphasis/Category: Russian Studies, Modern Europe (1798-)

Soviet Animation from the 1960s to the 1990s, that is, from the Cold War to Glasnost', was far from child's play. Animation in the former Soviet Union was a medium that allowed for the creation of life other than Soviet reality, despite the strict censorship of ideas during this time period. This course proposes to explore the concepts of the dual audience, ritualized master plots, Disneyfication, and montage. Students will also be introduced to the role of the KGB, the Soviet Underground, International Animation Festivals, the Soiuzmultfilm Animation Studio, and the Communist Party in the creation of animation. Students will become familiarized with the necessary technological aspects of animation, from stop-motion films to CGI, including scripts, storyboards, hand-drawn cells, the role of music and the intertextual relation of other arts and literature to this medium. The animated films will be presented thematically.
Days: TU TH  02:00-03:20 PM

SPANISH (F18)101A  INTRO IBER LIT&CULTMAHIEUX, V.
Emphasis/Category: Spanish-Portuguese Studies

An introduction to Spanish America’s principal texts and literary movements, with particular emphasis placed on the 19th and 20th centuries. The course aims to encourage reflection on the historical and political implications of literature and its role in defining, or questioning, a Latin American cultural identity. Includes workshops on developing skills for literary and cultural analysis.
Days: MO WE  11:00-11:50 AM

SPANISH (F18)185  DIASPORASNAVAJAS, G.
Emphasis/Category: Spanish-Portuguese Studies

Ideological Diasporas in Contemporary Spanish and European Fiction and Film

The confrontation between opposed ideological paradigms has been a defining trait of Spanish intellectual history.  Its consequences at the political and social levels have been internal division, forced displacement, and often violence. That protracted confrontation reached a dramatic high point during the 1930's, but its ramifications in various forms reach up to the present in the political, social, and cultural areas.  The course analyzes the causes and characteristics of the ideological and cultural divide of modern Spanish history with an emphasis on the discussion and the critical interpretation of relevant major texts and films of the current Spanish and European repertoire.
Days: TU TH  02:00-03:20 PM