Course Descriptions

Term:  

Winter Quarter

Dept Course No and Title Instructor
ART HIS (W22)30  LATIN AMERICAN ARTLAPIN DARDASHT, A.
This course charts the history of Latin American art and architecture from the invasion of the Americas in 1492 to the present. Covering a broad range of media including painting, sculpture, photography, performance, installation, and printmaking as well as architecture and urbanism, this course investigates transnational exchanges with West Africa, East and Southeast Asia, Western Europe, and North America; protest and resistance; migration; racism; the erasure of blackness; indigeneity; gender; sexuality; regionalism; and the relationship of the fine arts and popular culture. Aiming to challenge the whitewashed history of Latin American art, this course focuses on racial and ethnic identity formation within artistic production. We will examine the production of art in relation to shared issues of colonization, imperialism, and migration, understanding international exchange and racial formation through shifts in artistic production. 

In addition to lectures and section discussions, this course offers students the opportunity to become familiar with Southern California’s extensive Latin American art collections. Students will see Latin American objects at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), the Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach (MoLAA), and/or the J. Paul Getty Museums.
ART HIS (W22)40B  EUROPE: MEDIEVAL & RENAISSANCEFRANCOLINO, J.
AH 40B (Western Art of the Middle Ages and Renaissance) focuses on the long period that extends from the end of the Western Roman Empire in the fifth century through the sixteenth century. There are no prerequisites for the course and no expectations that students will necessarily have taken Art History 40A. Less a survey than a series of case studies, this course looks at colossal statues of emperors, miracle working icons, gem encrusted reliquaries, Gothic cathedrals, the eye-tricking illusions of Renaissance painters, the first nude statues in the West since antiquity, Michelangelo’s paintings in the Sistine Chapel, and Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa. In looking at these things, we will trace the emergence of European visual culture, its dialogue with other cultures, the questioning of the nature and validity of representation within that culture — especially the representation of the human body — and the gradual eclipse of the sacred icon by the secular, modern work of art during the Renaissance.
ART HIS (W22)42B  ARTS OF CHINAWUE, R.
This course offers an introduction to art history through the art and visual culture of China from the prehistoric era to the 20th century. We will examine how the religious, political, philosophical, and cultural traditions of China are expressed, created, and communicated by visual images and objects, proceeding chronologically and thematically. The objectives of this class are not only to gain knowledge of these art works within their cultural and historical contexts, but also to develop visual, writing, and analytical skills.
ART HIS (W22)134E  MODERN EURO ARTIBER, L.
What role did the image play in the construction of gender in nineteenth-century French society?
How did common conceptions of gender permeate aesthetic discourse and artistic production?
What conventions were employed in the representation of masculinity and femininity? How did
specific artworks challenge or reinforce notions of sexual difference and ideal beauty? In what
ways did a subject’s race, ethnicity, and class inform perceptions of gender and how were these
dimensions depicted? This course addresses those questions, among others, by exploring the
visualization of the human form in nineteenth-century France, across a range of media, including
painting, printmaking, drawing, sculpture, and photography. Relying on a variety of
methodological approaches and critical perspectives, we will situate artworks socially, politically,
and historically. We will consider aspects like the sexual politics of spectatorship, the relationship
between artist and model, myths of creativity and genius, cultural exchange and appropriation, and
institutional support and influence. Readings and discussion in English. No prior background in Art History necessary. 
ART HIS (W22)163  ASIAN AMERICAN ARTWINTHER TAMAKI, B.
This course investigates a broad selection of Asian American art from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present.  Moving roughly in chronological order, focus is placed on a series of artists such as I.M.Pei, Isamu Noguchi, and Nam June Paik. A wide range of media (painting, sculpture, architecture, performance, video) and diverse Asian American identities are considered. Emphasis is placed on the aesthetic and social analysis of works of art in the context of developments in American art history and issues in Asian American history.
ART HIS (W22)164B  CONTEMP AFAM ARTCOOKS, B.
This course is a study of art by African Americans with a particular focus on the politics of representation. Beginning chronologically with government sponsored artworks in the 1930s, students will discuss artworks created in a variety of forms including painting, sculpture, photography, installation, and new media. Museum visits are often incorporated.
ART HIS (W22)165C  MODERN AMERICAN ARTIQBAL, S.
Focusing on the period from 1900 to 1980, this course considers the emergence and institutionalization of modern art in the United States.
ART HIS (W22)165D  MODERN ART IN CALIFIQBAL, S.
This course examines the history of modern art in California from 1900 to 1980. Topics include Post-Surrealism, Los Angeles Hard-Edge Abstraction, West Coast Minimalism, and California Light and Space Art.
ART HIS (W22)190W  ART HISTORY METHODSWUE, R.
This seminar offers an overview of major approaches and methodologies in art history; it is also a writing-intensive course. We will examine various approaches in art history: by discussing, reading, and writing about a selection of art historical essays, students will come to a fuller understanding of approaches used to investigate the art work. Students are expected to make use of these approaches in their own writing, and through the process of producing their own research project, reflect on their own understanding of the art work. This course is required for art history majors.
ART HIS (W22)190W  ART HISTORY METHODSCOOKS, B.
Theory and practice of art history, with an emphasis on formal and social models of analyzing and writing about art.
ART HIS (W22)198  SITE SPECIFICITYNISBET, J.
An examination of the ecological and cultural concerns attending art created for the sole purpose of existing in a single place. Using our own location at UC Irvine as focus, we will consider site-specific art from the late twentieth century to the present, alongside the history of settler colonialism in California and perspectives drawn from Indigenous understandings of place.

For the most up-to-date information, check the Schedule of Classes.