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Date Title Outlet Notes
6/05/2018 Can Green Diplomacy Take Root in the DMZ? Edge Effects  David Fedman [assistant professor of] history at the University of California, Irvine, writes, “Indeed, whatever their disagreements on denuclearization and unification, both Koreas recognize the value in environmental coordination and natural disaster management. … The environmental challenges posed by climate change and sea level rise likewise offer a natural path for dialogue and cooperation, as coastal regions and fisheries across the peninsula share these risks.”
6/04/2018 Are Chinese youth desperate for uncensored internet access? OZY Jeffrey Wasserstrom, a historian at the University of California, Irvine, says it’s not that the Chinese aren’t aware of censorship, but rather they might not care because most of the things they do on the internet — like people the whole world over — aren’t about finding edgy news stories.
6/03/2018 Food waste is destroying the planet. Doing something about it starts at home Los Angeles Times  Alumna Sharon Kunde '18 (Ph.D. English) writes, “Food is part of the fleeting pleasure of being mortal on this Earth. Appreciate that. Value it. Buy ugly produce. Ignore the expiration date if the food smells fine. Use vegetable scraps to make stock. Compost. Plant a garden or a fruit tree."

Date Title Outlet Notes
5/15/2018 Identical Twins Hint at How Environments Change Gene Expression The Atlantic  Erika Hayasaki, associate professor in the Literary Journalism Program at the University of California, Irvine, writes: “Twin studies have historically been some of the most valuable genetic research tools in the world—contributing a century of data to our knowledge of human behavioral, medical, and physical traits.”
5/15/2018 From the Little Red Book to the Big White one The Times Literary Supplement Jeffrey Wasserstrom, professor of history at UC Irvine, writes: “Looking back to the 2009 Frankfurt Book Fair, when China was controversially selected to be the “guest of honor” nation, I find that the back and forth over dissent and freedom of expression (which fascinated me then) seems less interesting than something I barely noticed at the time: a dog that didn’t bark. I don’t recall seeing any books by or images of Hu Jintao, then China’s paramount leader, in the Chinese official display area.”
5/14/2018 Trump’s Wall: A Conservative Conceptual Art Installation The New York Times  Héctor Tobar, associate professor of Chicano/Latino studies and literary journalism at UC Irvine, writes: “President Trump’s new wall would be more insult than injury. For a man who began his campaign degrading Mexican immigrants, it’s another ugly, empty rhetorical flourish; only this one would be made with concrete and rebar.”
5/11/2018  There will be no Nobel Prize in literature this year. And that's a shame. The Los Angeles Times  Just consider the writers who never won a Nobel, which can be awarded only to a living author …. Then consider those who ought to win. For the last several years, I've been holding out for Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o, the 80-year-old Kenyan author who directs the International Center for Writing and Translation at UC Irvine.
5/11/2018 New in Paperback: ‘The Ministry of Utmost Happiness,’ ‘Where the Water Goes’ The New York Times  Surfing with Sartre: An Aquatic Inquiry into a Life of Meaning by Professor of Philosophy Aaron James is featured in the NY Times.
5/03/18 Student-run InSight Magazine explores poverty and inequality in Southern California Daily Pilot  Aditi Mayer [UCI literary journalism major] surveyed the gathering crowd in the Viewpoint Gallery inside UC Irvine's Student Center. She alternated between craning her neck and subtle pacing as the room began to fill up before the start of InSight Magazine's launch event on April 24. The student-run publication out of UC Irvine's Blum Center for Poverty Alleviation focuses on poverty and inequality in Southern California.
4/26/18 RTP 180 | Language: John Smith on Learning Another Language (video) UNC-TV John H. Smith, professor of German at the University of California, Irvine, discusses the value of learning a foreign language and why he ended up learning German.
4/19/18 International authors take center stage at festival SFGate Currently a professor of English and comparative literature at UC Irvine, [Ngugi] wa Thiong’o will appear at the Freight & Salvage at 11:45 a.m. Saturday, April 28, to talk about “Wrestling with the Devil: A Prison Memoir,” written in the early 1980s but not published in the United States until last month.
4/19/18 ‘Viet Stories’ exhibit highlights the struggles and achievements of Vietnamese in the U.S. Daily Pilot  "Most Americans may not know a lot about Vietnamese Americans," said Linda Vo, an Asian American studies professor at UC Irvine and co-curator of the exhibition. … The idea for "Viet Stories" originated years ago, when Vo and Le were organizing a Vietnamese American oral history project out of UC Irvine.
4/12/18  Guilty or not guilty? It’s Shakespearean drama as UCI law school deans face off in mock trial of Hamlet Daily Pilot  For one night, the Irvine Barclay Theatre was transformed into a courtroom where Song Richardson, the dean of UCI Law, defended the fictional Danish prince against a charge of first-degree murder in the killing of Polonius. The prosecutor was played by Erwin Chemerinsky, UCI Law's founding dean and now dean of UC Berkeley's law school. U.S. District Judge Andrew Guilford moderated the event as the two presented their case to the jury — the audience — which ultimately determined Hamlet's fate.
4/08/18 Pedagogic, Not Didactic: Michael Cart on Young Adult Fiction Los Angeles Review of Books Jonathan Alexander, Chancellor’s Professor of English at UC Irvine, writes, “I recently “sat down” (virtually) with Michael Cart to pick his brain about the continuing commercial success of YA, its cultural relevance, and his thoughts about the genre’s future.”
4/06/18 Steamship globalisation [Subscription required.] Financial Times  Jeffrey Wasserstrom, [UCI Chancellor’s Professor of history], writes, “In A World of Empires, Edyta Bojanowska opens an intriguing window on to this earlier age of globalisation. She does so by focusing in tightly on a long journey from St Petersburg to Japan made in the 1850s by the steamship Pallada, part of a squadron of Russian vessels whose mission was to establish trade relations.”
4/05/18 Refugees who left post-war Vietnam document their journeys in 'Viet Stories' NBC News  “We wanted to explain, ‘Who are these refugees?’” said Linda Trinh Vo, co-curator of the exhibition and professor of Asian American Studies at the University of California, Irvine. … “Viet Stories,” which grew out an oral history project that Vo started at the University of California, Irvine, is also a call to other Vietnamese Americans, said Vo.
4/05/18 Guggenheim Memorial Foundation announces new fellows — and pays tribute to grantees from California Los Angeles Times  “It involves an extremely rigorous screening and selection,” says newly named fellow and UC Irvine humanities professor Edward Dimendberg. “You don’t just get a Guggenheim. There are all these levels of screening, committees and then the board of trustees.” … “I’m on cloud nine still,” he says of receiving the award.
3/23/18 The Book List: Author of the Week [Subscription required.] The Week Ngugi wa Thiong’o [UCI distinguished professor of comparative literature] … has used his writing to defy every force that would circumscribe his freedoms, and his latest memoir, Wrestling With the Devil, revisits one of his most storied acts of imaginative rebellion.
3/16/2018 National Geographic Replaces Racist Fictions With Post-racial Fantasies New York Magazine Last year, I predicted 2017 (and the era of Trump more generally) would be a time of renewed faith in the political efficacy of interracial romance and procreation. This prediction was informed by two recent books — one by UC Irvine professor Jared Sexton, the other by NYU professor Tavia Nyong’o — which probe the way racial hybridity is used to avoid reflection and recollection on how white supremacy works
3/16/2018  A forgotten hero stopped the My Lai massacre 50 years ago today Los Angeles Times  Jon Wiener, professor emeritus of history at UC Irvine, writes: “We know that Americans committed a massacre 50 years ago today; and we also know that an American stopped it.”
3/23/2018 A Kenyan author examines his life and times in 'Wrestling With the Devil' Pittsburgh Post-Gazette In “Wrestling With the Devil: A Prison Memoir,” Mr. wa Thiong’o, currently a Distinguished Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Irvine, adds yet another important book to his literary canon, where he deconstructs the language of colonialism, as much as he continues pounding away at the ills of capitalism, religion and the neocolonial estate as tools of subjugation.
4/25/2018 President Xi Jinping's Indefinite Rule Denounced by Chinese Intellectual Real News Network  China concluded its annual National People's Congress on Tuesday. Normally the 16-day National People's Congress, which is China's legislature, is a routine affair. This time, however, it took many momentous decisions. … Joining me now to analyze the Congress is Professor Jeffrey Wasserstrom. He is Chancellor's Professor of History at UC Irvine.
3/08/2018  Overlooked The New York Times  But scholars say the enduring strength of Qiu’s legacy lies not only in her leadership, but also — and perhaps more important — in her willingness to ultimately sacrifice her life for the cause. “She argued that it wasn’t enough for women to just sit around and ask for equality,” said Hu Ying, a professor of Chinese literature at University of California, Irvine. “She believed you had to be willing to put your life on the line. And the fact that she really did put her life on the line is what made her words stick.”
3/12/2018  Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o: 'Resistance is the best way of keeping alive' The Guardian  Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o believes in the imagination. Perhaps that seems obvious for the decorated Kenyan novelist, [UCI Distinguished Professor], scholar and playwright, who’s been publishing for over 50 years. But imagination, and all art, for him, is not just a form of creativity; it’s a form of resistance. In his case, once imprisoned for his political beliefs, it was his most important possession in a brutal environment meant to break him.
3/10/2018  Socialism with Chinese characteristics? Beijing's propaganda explained CNN Jeffrey Wasserstrom, professor of history at University of California, Irvine, said, "(The phrase) explains how it can be that China is headed by a Communist Party yet has abandoned some of the main things typically associated with Marxism, such as working toward a future in which wealth is fairly evenly distributed,"
03/10/2018 Women in China, past and present OUPblog  Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor’s Professor of History at University of California, Irvine and Maura E. Cunningham, [UCI Ph.D. in Chinese history], write: “Shifts in the status of women—or the lack thereof—offer evidence for the need to think about variations as well as continuities across dynasties. … In their own ways, elite Ming and Qing women carved out spaces for themselves, creating vibrant intellectual, cultural, and social networks.”
3/09/2018 All Quiet on the Campus Front—Contrasting the 1910s and 1980s with the 2010s China Policy Institute: Analysis Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor’s Professor of History at UC Irvine, writes: “When news broke that Xi Jinping would not be limited to serving just two terms as President, while some commentators turned to international ruler-for-life comparisons, others looked to China’s own past for illuminating parallels and contrasts. As someone who began his career studying student-led activism and remains interested in the subject, I was struck immediately by references to two decades that figure centrally in the history of that topic: the 1910s and the 1980s.”
3/08/2018  5 wonderful new books for Southern California readers Orange County Register  The Sea Beast Takes a Lover: Stories by Michael Andreasen. The title may have echoes of “The Shape of Water,” but this debut collection of stories by a University of California, Irvine MFA graduate is definitely not like anything you’ve seen before. Filled with fantastical fables full of futuristic moments, time travelers, mermaids and exploding children, the collection is playful and heartbreaking all at once.
3/08/2018  Feeling the Fear of Difference: Celebrating “A Wrinkle in Time” Los Angeles Review of Books Jonathan Alexander, Chancellor’s Professor of English at UC Irvine, writes: “I have been ridiculously excited about the release of Disney’s film adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time, which is due out March 9. I say “ridiculously” because I’m a 50-year-old white man whose passion for L’Engle’s work strikes some of my colleagues and friends as … odd.”
3/08/2018 Want insight into China's political situation? Keep an eye on new animal memes Los Angeles Times  Maura E. Cunningham, [UCI Ph.D. in Chinese history] and [UCI history Professor] Jeffrey Wasserstrom, write: “Chinese authorities obviously do not want free and open conversations about Xi Jinping’s possible ascendancy to president for life.”
3/07/2018  'You're Not My First Enemy': In Long-Lost Jewish Songs Of WWII, Pain And Defiance NPR At a recent appearance at the University of California, Irvine, presented by the school's Center for Jewish Studies under the title "Last Yiddish Heroes," they began the program with "Babi Yar." … The audience, a mix of young undergrads and older Jewish couples and families, listened, rapt; by the song's end, more than a few were dabbing their eyes.
3/06/2018  The lemongrass burrito is the new America. Can either party keep up? CNN "If you look [in Orange County] at the city councils, the mayors, to school boards, those Asian-Americans for the most part have been Republicans, and Republicans have done more outreach," says Linda Trinh Vo, a professor of Asian-American studies at the University of California, Irvine. "And because Orange County is so Republican, that's how they thought they could win. So the two kind of reinforced one another."
2/22/2018 ‘My god is more of a god than your god is ungodly - the same applies to languages,’ says writer Ngugi Wa Thiong’o Hindustan Times Ngugi Wa Thiong’o, a titan of world literature, was born in a colonised Kenya in 1938. Along with Chinua Achebe and Wole Soyinka, Ngugi is one of the pillars of African literature. Currently, Distinguished Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Irvine, USA, he has been in exile from Kenya since the early ’80s.
2/21/2018 Spain helps keep alive archaic language of Sephardic Jews AP  Jacobo Sefami, a Sephardi born in Mexico and now a professor at the University of California, Irvine, is pessimistic. “The truth is that no children are speaking it anymore and its progress toward extinction seems irreversible,” he wrote in an email to the Associated Press.
2/15/2018 Ngugi wa Thiong’o urges intellectuals to rally against the ‘destroyers’ of the world Scroll  Ngugi Wa Thiong'o, [professor of comparative literature at UCI], writes: “The challenge for the intellectual is to make words become flesh, to make them breathe distinctly.” … “We only have to connect, to help put faiths and doctrines and languages, big or small, into dialogue. And if, in this connection, I quote Cesaire, it is because what he says of culture contact was our organising motto at the International Center for Writing and Translation at the University of California, Irvine.”
2/14/2018 Review: The Restless Generation of ‘Young China’ The Wall Street Journal  [UCI Chancellor’s Professor] Jeffrey Wasserstrom, writes, “Flash forward to the 2010s and what leaps out from Zak Dychtwald’s engrossing “Young China” are the many contemporary parallels between growing up in China and the United States. … What was once a chasm is now often just a gap.”
2/01/2018  Report Highlights Diversity of California’s Asian American Community in the Real “OC” NPQ Sylvia Kim, regional director for Asian Americans Advancing Justice–Orange County, notes that “People always say that Orange County has the third-largest Asian American population in the country, and that Orange County’s population is 20 percent Asian American. But what does that really mean?” A new 150-page report authored by Linda Trinh Vo and Laureen D. Hom of the University of California, Irvine, that Kim’s group has published seeks to answer that question.
2/05/2018 UCI Jewish community gets its own Torah and its 304,805 letters Orange County Register Matthias Lehmann, director of the UCI Center of Jewish Studies, called the new Torah “a beautiful symbol of the Jewish tradition. … I love the idea that this is called the Unity Torah,” he said. “I think it’s important for all of us to come together and to show UCI is a welcoming place for all students.”
2/01/2018 Study shows how Asian Americans are transforming O.C., and highlights diversity and disparities Daily Pilot "This is our chance to really make the case that immigrants and refugees do not drain the society — that we are contributors to society," said Linda Trinh Vo, professor of Asian American Studies at UC Irvine and co-author of the study, at the report's launch.
1/31/2018 James Kyung-Jin Lee, professor and priest, contemplates Lunar New Year Orange County Register [James Kyung-Jin Lee] is an associate professor of Asian-American studies at UC Irvine and assisting priest at The Church of the Messiah in Santa Ana, which welcome members of the LGBTQ community.
1/31/2018  UC Irvine to host free forum on America’s identity featuring Jill Lepore Orange County Register UC Irvine will host a forum to explore America’s identity at home and abroad on Feb. 9 and 10. ... Panelists, including keynote speaker Jill Lepore … will try to address and to answer the question, “Who Do We Think We Are?”
1/31/2018 Court rules Spotify and Apple Music must pay artists more for songs Mashable UC Irvine media studies professor Peter Krapp told Mashable it would take about 4 million Spotify streams for a songwriter to make minimum wage in California over the course of a month. 
1/28/2018 Orange County Report: AAPI are a lot more complicated than a simple stereotype AsAmNews Dr. Linda Trinh Vo, study co-author and UC Irvine School of Humanities professor of Asian American Studies said, “Despite these numbers and the rapid growth of the AA&NHPI population, there is little research available that describes the distinct cultures and histories across ethnic groups, their social, political, and economic contributions to the county, or the needs of a population whose majority is immigrants and refugees."
1/27/2018 We Need Protests. And Paintings. The New York Times  Héctor Tobar, associate professor at the University of California, Irvine, writes, “To defend the place of millions of immigrants and their progeny in American society, we need not only protest of political changes but also more art. We need to bring the ambitions, the foibles and the soul of immigrant America into the collective American mind. And for that we need television shows and movies, and more novels, poems, paintings and songs. High art and low.”
1/25/2018 Living in the Present: On Kieran Setiya’s “Midlife: A Philosophical Guide” Los Angeles Review of Books  Karl Schafer, professor of philosophy at the University of California, Irvine, writes, “Popular philosophy seems to be in season. Even confining ourselves to the modest universe of my social media feed, this past fall alone offered us a philosophical analysis of misogyny, a defense of the “ethics of awesomeness,” a meditation on surfing and existentialism, a philosophical conversation about the later stages of life — and, our topic, a philosophical guide to middle age, Kieran Setiya’s Midlife.”
1/19/18 China and the US: 2 different approaches to culture Shine  “In the Chinese language there is wenhua (文化) for culture but also wenming (文明) for civilization,” says Jeffrey Wasserstrom, a China scholar and history professor at the University of California Irvine. “They go together, and the root has something to do with creation and texts and things passed on.
1/18/18 UC Irvine theater professor’s new production tells a story through physical movement Daily Pilot  The perennial theme of the directionless child’s search for identity is told in the book She by author and UC Irvine English professor Michelle Latiolais. The 2016 book has been successful, receiving rave reviews from various outlets, and the tale will unfold in a new medium Jan. 25 through 28 with a free theater production adapted by fellow UCI professor Annie Loui.
1/08/18 Trump and the Protesters: From Iran to Orange County CounterPunch  Roxanne Varzi, associate professor of anthropology and film and media studies at University of California, Irvine, writes, “I’ve spent my adult life researching and writing on Iran as an anthropologist and living between both countries. I increasingly see more similarities than differences.”
1/03/18 Former Orange Coast Editor Martin J. Smith on His New Book Orange Coast Magazine Barry Siegel, formerly from the LA Times and the current director of the Literary Journalism program at UC Irvine. He wrote story called “A Death in White Bear Lake” that he later turned into a book that I just thought was a masterwork of narrative journalism.
1/03/18 China’s ‘Long Arm’ Inside Higher Education  Jeffrey Wasserstrom, the Chancellor's Professor of History at the University of California, Irvine, ... added that scholarly publishers have leverage they can use. “The reason why I'm particularly distressed about the situation with Springer,” he said, “is that with the desire to compete internationally, the Chinese authorities actually really care about the journal Nature" -- a premier scientific journal published by Springer.

Date Title Outlet Notes
12/28/17 John Green’s Anxieties: On “Turtles All the Way Down” Los Angeles Review of Books  Jonathan Alexander, English professor at UC Irvine, writes, “[John] Green has justly made a name for himself with poignant tales of adolescents worrying over their place in the world. His prose is clean, and his characters are often compelling.”
12/21/17  Christmas for Xi Dissent David Bandurski and Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor’s Professor of History at UC Irvine, write, “Christmas came early this year for Xi Jinping, the Chinese leader who, domestically at least, seems to have it all. He already had a compliant press, an adoring population, and a long list of titles—including head of the Chinese Communist Party and President of the PRC—when the Leninist organization he leads gave him a new gift in October by slipping a shiny phrase, “Xi Jinping Thought,” into the latest revision of the country’s constitution.”
12/21/17 The Fascinating History Behind Why Jewish Families Eat Chinese Food on Christmas Mental Floss According to Yong Chen, a history professor at the University of California-Irvine and author of Chop Suey, USA: The Story of Chinese Food in America, "[Diners] were attracted to Chinese food because, in their mind, it represented American cosmopolitanism and middle class status."
12/20/17  Net neutrality vote will require users to 'pay to play' Daily Pilot  Peter Krapp, professor and chair of film and media studies at UC Irvine, writes: “Competition will not fix this, since most Americans face local broadband monopolies. The claim that deregulation will spur infrastructure investment rings hollow — it is hardly a proven correlation ... The only incentive is for corporations to raise tolls. The losers in this decision are we, the people.”
12/20/17  Report: Challenges Persist for Latino Students Diverse Education  Just 30 miles south of Whittier at the University of California, Irvine, the disparity in graduation rates between White and Latino students is at three percent. That said, according to new admissions data, it is the first choice for Latino students out of all of the University of California campuses. “I think there’s a difference between a Latino-enrolling campus and a Latino-thriving campus,” said Dr. Douglas Haynes, UCI vice provost of academic equity, diversity and inclusion and professor of history. “The difference is intentionality.”
12/11/2017 Other People’s Children, Part 3, or Ghost Touches: Myriam Gurba’s “Mean” and Sexual Violence Los Angeles Review of Books  Jonathan Alexander, Chancellor’s Professor of English at UC Irvine writes, “Myriam Gurba’s Mean opens with the brutal rape and murder of a young homeless Mexican woman named Sophia. … Gurba disturbs us with a deadly violent sexual assault on another woman. And yet this opening might be the most appropriate choice Gurba could have made. For while she quickly moves to relating her own tales of sexual abuse and exploration, she never lets us forget that an embodied life is always full of the impress, imprint, and pressure of other bodies.”
12/08/17 The Adult Bodies Playing Teens on TV Slate  When a 12-year-old Brooke Shields played a sex-trafficked child in 1978s Pretty Baby, child welfare organizations “threatened to take the child actress out of her mother’s custody,” writes Kristen Hatch, a University of California, Irvine, film and media studies professor, in her essay “Fille Fatale: Regulating Images of Adolescent Girls, 1962-1996.” It would make sense, then, for producers to cast adults in productions that depict young teens engaging in sexual activity, rather than navigate the complex moral and PR dilemmas that arise around child performers.
12/08/2017 Doom Season in Los Angeles The New York Times  Hector Tobar, associate professor of Chicano/Latino studies & English, writes: “Before the fires came, our skin turned dry and the winds cleared the smog from the air. November passed with barely any rain, and on Thanksgiving the high was 92 degrees. We Angelenos had been blessed with a beautiful autumn. But all the while, we felt a sense of doom.”
12/08/2017 ‘Freedom Writers’ teacher urges Back Bay High students to ‘never suffer in silence’ Daily Pilot  The UC Irvine English alumna, Erin Gruwell shared how she initially envisioned becoming a lawyer before she landed her first job as a teacher at Wilson High School in Long Beach in 1994. She later turned the experience into a book, which was adapted into the movie “Freedom Writers” in 2007. She also founded the Freedom Writers Foundation in 1997 to inspire students to use writing to communicate instead of violence.
12/02/17 The great interpreter Business Standard  Ahead of China’s widely scrutinized reshuffle of its senior leadership last month, Jeffrey Wasserstrom was asked by CNN to name the five most powerful people in China ... [w]ith his characteristic directness, Wasserstrom, a professor of history at the University of California, Irvine and the author of eminently readable books on modern China, declined to play along, telling CNN that the five people to watch were “Xi, Xi, Xi, Xi and Xi.”
12/01/17  Joseph White, pioneering black psychologist who mentored students at UC Irvine, dies at 84 Los Angeles Times  A pioneer in the field of black psychology and an influential figure to countless students at UC Irvine Joseph L. White was 84 and planning for the future. The article discusses his tenure as director of the UCI Program in African American Studies (now a full-fledged department).
11/30/2017      Knight The Los Angeles Review of Books  Catherine Liu, Film and Media Studies professor at UC Irvine, writes, “Knight’s fall from art world grace has shaken me to the core: I am a slightly different person today than I was on October 24, 2017, the day before the first stories about the suit filed against him appeared in the news.”
11/29/2017 UC Irvine student spearheads first student-funded scholarship for refugees and asylum seekers Daily Pilot  An encounter with Syrian refugees during a family trip to Turkey in 2014 inspired a UC Irvine senior to create the University of California’s first student-funded scholarship program for refugees and asylum seekers. Iman Siddiqi, 20, raised a little over $93,000 for the program this month during a banquet at UCI.
11/29/2017  Little Saigon’s restaurant scene is revived with second-generation Vietnamese Americans mixing it up Daily Pilot  “It’s not just an ethnic enclave for Vietnamese refugees who couldn’t speak English very well,” said Linda Trinh Vo, professor of Asian American Studies at UC Irvine. “It’s becoming a place that’s attracting new clients, new businesses, the younger generation, non-Vietnamese and foodies. It’s becoming known as a place for food innovation.”
11/28/2017  It’s Never Too Early to Learn to Think The Chronicle of Higher Education  Today Marcello Fiocco is an associate professor of philosophy at the University of California at Irvine, where he tries to create such revelatory moments in his own classrooms. But he’s not just doing it for college students. He’s going into local elementary schools — and taking graduate students with him. Fiocco’s project is called TH!NK.
11/22/17  Professor Aaron James Lives a Life Dedicated to the Pursuit of Knowledge and Epic Surf The Inertia  Being a bit of a philosophy nerd myself, to sit down with James at UC Irvine – where he currently teaches in the philosophy department – to unpack the dense philosophical principles he outlines in his newest book, Surfing with Sartre, was a treat. It’s a text that pits the surfer’s intrinsic philosophical understanding of the world around him or her against the theses of various continental philosophers about existence, work, beauty, etc.
11/21/2017  Are Asian-American churches in Orange County slowly shifting their stance on LGBTQ relationships? Orange County Register  Theologically, many Asian-American churches, especially Korean and Chinese American, align with an evangelical understanding of the scripture. Those churches often refrain from discussing LGBTQ identity, said the Rev. James Kyung-Jin Lee, an associate professor of Asian-American studies at UC Irvine and an assisting priest at The Church of the Messiah in Santa Ana, an LGBTQ-welcoming multicultural church.
11/21/2017  The Contradictions of Joseph Conrad The New York Times  Ngugi wa Thiong’o, English professor at UC Irvine, writes, “I turned my back on reading Joseph Conrad in 1967. This was also the year that I published “A Grain of Wheat,” my third novel, which I wrote soon after reading Conrad’s “Under Western Eyes.” I could not put words to what repelled me, because, despite the unease, his influence on my work was unmistakable, and long lasting. …The difference in style was a result of my encounter with Conrad.”
11/14/2017  What Happened to Trump's Trade War With China? The Real News  Jeffrey Wasserstrom, who has been traveling to and writing about China for thirty years, is Chancellor's Professor of History at UC Irvine. Despite all his posturing, President Donald Trump's maiden trip to China was mostly just symbolic, says author and scholar Jeffrey Wasserstrom.
11/10/2017  UCI computer game explores culture of 18th-century Ghana Daily Pilot  Patricia Seed, professor of history, discusses her collaboration with two other UCI colleagues to create "Sankofa," a computer game that explores the culture of 18th-century Ghana
11/10/2017  The Winners and Losers of Trump’s Asia Trip, So Far New York Magazine  “China wants good photo ops to show the domestic audience that Xi is equal to Trump, and China is almost guaranteed to get that,” Jeff Wasserstrom, a professor of modern Chinese history at the University of California, Irvine, told The Guardian.
11/10/2017  Travel ban affects UC Irvine conference KPCC  Deanna Kashani, Ph.D. student in visual studies, and Touraj Daryaee, director of the UCI Jordan Center for Persian Studies and Culture, speak about how the administration's travel ban affects intellectual dialogue and engagement across borders.
11/10/2017 The Winners and Losers of Trump’s Asia Trip, So Far New York Magazine  “China wants good photo ops to show the domestic audience that Xi is equal to Trump, and China is almost guaranteed to get that,” Jeff Wasserstrom, a professor of modern Chinese history at the University of California, Irvine, told The Guardian.
11/08/17  Existential Shred | UC Irvine professor and avid surfer Aaron James questions whether hell is other people in the lineup. Orange Coast  Philosopher Aaron James is best known for the book “Assholes: A Theory: … His new book, “Surfing with Sartre: An Aquatic Inquiry into a Life of Meaning,” is a philosophical study of a classic O.C. persona—the laid-back surfer. We asked the UC Irvine professor—a longtime surfer himself—to delve into the go-with-the-flow attitude and other topics.
11/07/17  What will happen on Trump's super-sized state visit to China? The Guardian  Jeff Wasserstrom, a professor of modern Chinese history at the University of California, Irvine says, “China wants good photo ops to show the domestic audience that Xi is equal to Trump, and China is almost guaranteed to get that." 
11/07/17  Immigration laws reason for the US Chinese restaurant boom China Daily  Yong Chen, professor of history at the University of California, Irvine and author of "Chop Suey, U.S.A: The Rise of Chinese Food in America," writes, "It started to become popular among non-Chinese consumers towards to the end of the 19th century because of the growing need for convenient and inexpensive restaurant food."
11/04/17  Censorship: How China is tightening its grip on Hong Kong Foreign Correspondents' Club Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor’s Professor of History at the University of California at Irvine said, "The disappearance of the Hong Kong booksellers, the silencing of previously vocal critics of China, and the flooding of pro-China posters around the city during the 20th anniversary of the Handover celebrations are all signs of tightening control." 
11/04/17  China censorship drive splits leading academic publishers The Financial Times  Jeffrey Wasserstrom, professor of Chinese history at the University of California, Irvine, called on publishers to resist Beijing and test its willingness to block access en masse to the world’s greatest producers of scientific and educational content.
11/04/17  Why China won 2017 and how Donald Trump helped them do it CNN  Jeffrey Wasserstrom, professor of history at University of California, Irvine, said the chaos inside the Trump administration had accidentally drawn the world's attention from Liu's death. "(He was) the first Nobel Peace Prize winner since Nazi times to die in prison," Wasserstrom told CNN. "That would have been, and should have been, a much bigger story than it was."
11/02/17 After Goudou Goudou: Ordinary Lives in Port-au-Prince The Los Angeles Review of Books  Amy Wilentz, English professor at UC Irvine, writes, “But Lavil is not just a recitation of complaint and tragedy, though those are certainly included within it. … Here, we are privy to real voices shouting about human survival in the wasteland the global economy has created, about piecing together a life filled with humanity, charity, and familial love in the midst of grinding hardship, in the care of a state whose gaze is elsewhere.”
11/02/17 'Surfing With Sartre,’ by Aaron James San Francisco Chronicle  Aaron James, a UC Irvine philosophy professor writes, “I know I speak for surfers everywhere, in saying that the act of surfing a wave has no equal, in aquatic sports, solo sports, action sports, and maybe any sports whatever. Surfing is the zenith of all human endeavors.'
11/01/17  Xi Jinping: China's 'Chairman of Everything' The Real News  Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor’s Professor of History at UC Irvine states, “I think that's very important because even though it's become conventional to refer to him as President Xi Jinping, his power really derives first and foremost from being head of the Chinese Communist Party.”
10/27/17  Confronting Uncertain Worlds: Comics with Young Female Protagonists Los Angeles Review of Books  Jens Lloyd, a PhD candidate in the English Department at UC Irvine, writes “Once rebuked for seducing innocent young minds, mainstream comic books are now comfortably established as a medium for the middle-aged.”
10/27/17 Make China Great Again KCRW Xi is being called 'the most powerful man in the world,' as China builds a modern military and may already have out-stripped the US economically. But will China be 'great' for free speech, an independent judiciary or human rights? Guests: … Jeffrey Wasserstrom, University of California, Irvine ….
10/24/17 UCI Opens Center in Support of Jewish Studies New University  Matthias Lehmann, Teller Family Chair in Jewish History, and Georges Van Den Abbeele, dean of the UCI School of Humanities, are quoted in this article about the launch of the UCI Center for Jewish Studies.
10/24/17 UCI Celebrates Its Work With Scholars at Risk New University  Jane O. Newman, professor of comparative literature and UCI’s Scholars at Risk campus liaison looks forward to UCI’s further involvement with Scholars at Risk. Newman is working with the Office of the Provost on a UCI program designed to host a scholar at risk; UCI hopes to host its first scholar in fall 2018.
10/24/17 Chinese President Xi Jinping just managed to secure himself Mao-like power Vox  Jeffrey Wasserstrom, a historian of China at the University of California Irvine, says it’s premature to say whether Xi’s level of power should be compared directly to Mao, the founder of modern China, or Deng, the iconic reformer who opened up China’s economy to the world in the 1980s and helped pave the path to its meteoric rise today. “It’s better to focus on the fact that he’s in the same league as those two,” Wasserstrom told me.
10/23/17  A Roadmap to Qur’ans in English The Los Angeles Review of Books  Jack Miles, professor emeritus of English and religious studies at the University of California, Irvine, writes, “Bruce B. Lawrence, professor emeritus of the Duke University Islamic Studies Center, is the author of The Qur’an: A Biography (2006), published as part of the Atlantic Monthly Press series “Books That Shook the World.” Now, as a more than welcome guide for the perplexed, comes a companion volume: The Koran in English: A Biography, in the thriving “Lives of Great Religious Books” series at Princeton University Press. Lawrence makes the story of the Qur’an in English as informative as it is fascinating.”
10/19/17 Divorce was long taboo for Vietnamese immigrants. After years in the U.S., they're accepting it more Los Angeles Times  “Before, people felt this duty to stay married because of finances or because they were sponsored to come to this country together or traditional expectations. They don’t seek help due to shame,” said Linda Vo, professor of Asian American studies at UC Irvine.
10/19/17 Xi Jinping may be the most powerful Chinese leader since Mao. He might get stronger still. CNBC  Jeffrey Wasserstrom, a historian of China at the University of California Irvine notes, Xi doesn't have to do anything exceptional to increase China's standing in a global order led by Trump.
10/19/17 Xi Jinping may be the most powerful Chinese leader since Mao. He might get stronger still. Vox  Of course, Xi may not need a boost in the first place. As Jeffrey Wasserstrom, a historian of China at the University of California Irvine notes, Xi doesn’t have to do anything exceptional to increase China’s standing in a global order led by Trump.
10/18/17 'A huge deal' for China as the era of Xi Jinping Thought begins The Guardian  Jeff Wasserstrom, a professor of modern Chinese history at the University of California, Irvine, said the move to honor China’s leader underlined the “radical shift” that had taken place in Chinese politics since a relatively unknown Xi took power in November 2012. In the five years since, Xi has overseen a severe political chill and built a reputation as one of the country’s most dominant leaders since Mao.
10/18/17     5 Years Ago, China's Xi Jinping Was Largely Unknown. Now He's Poised To Reshape China NPR  Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor’s professor of history at UC Irvine, writes: “In the autumn of 2012, Xi Jinping — the Chinese Communist Party general secretary, someone the Economist recently dubbed the 'world's most powerful man' — was a little-known figure. … That was five long years ago. And the reality of how Xi is ruling China has confounded those early predictions.
Now, Xi's face and words are everywhere
10/17/17  Amid rise in anti-Semitism, UC Irvine to open Center for Jewish Studies Orange County Register  Now is the ideal time to establish a Center for Jewish Studies at UC Irvine, said the center’s director, history professor Matthias Lehmann. “This is a time when we are seeing a resurgence in anti-Semitism,” he said. “It is important to have a center where we can educate people about the Jewish experience, history and religion.”
10/17/17  The TV shows that have won hearts – and changed minds KPCC A 2006 study found that exposure to the gay characters in “Will & Grace” had the same effect as interpersonal contact in viewers who did not regularly interact with members of the gay community. And now that television is more diverse than ever, shows like “Transparent”, “Black-ish”, “Modern Family” and “The Middle” regularly introduce audiences to characters from different cultural, social, economic and racial/ethnic backgrounds. … Guest: Victoria Johnson, associate professor of film and media studies and of African American studies at UC Irvine.
10/16/17 UCI Bolsters Jewish Studies Orange County Business Journal  University of California, Irvine said today it will create a Center for Jewish Studies that will bring together faculty, students, visiting scholars and members of the public interested in exploring Judaism. Matthias Lehmann, UCI’s Teller Family Chair in Jewish History, will lead the center along with various faculty and an advisory board of community members.
10/12/17 China's Communist party congress – all you need to know The Guardian  As the curtain falls on Xi’s first term his political supremacy is beyond doubt. Asked to name China’s five most powerful people this week, Jeff Wasserstrom, a University of California China expert, told CNN: “Xi, Xi, Xi, Xi, and Xi.”
10/10/17 In China, Scholars Are Being Punished Amid Growing Squeeze On Public Expression NPR  Jeffrey Wasserstrom, historian at the University of California, Irvine, says Cambridge University Press' decision to pull the material 'was bad not just because it meant that academics in China were deprived of access to state-of-the art scholarship from another part of the world.' Worse, he says, it misled people in China 'into imagining that a journal was not publishing what it in fact was. So it violated the integrity of the journal.'
10/9/17  Shakespeare in Swahililand Folger Shakespeare Library  Two literary scholars discuss Shakespeare’s influence on the politics, history, and literary culture of East Africa. … NgÅ©gÄ© Wa Thiong’o, the renowned Kenyan playwright, novelist, dissident, and social activist, grew up in Kenya when it was still a British colony and is now a Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of California, Irvine.
10/8/17 Cancelled cock fights, censored Internet and scrapped holidays: China prepares for its biggest political meeting The Globe and Mail  Jeff Wasserstrom, a specialist in modern Chinese history at University of California, Irvine [said], 'Each time special steps are taken to rein in civil society activity, sweep the Internet clean of material the government doesn't like and so on, things get more controlled than they were the last time around, and we are seeing this with the 19th Party Congress.'
9/26/17 7 Things People Get Wrong About American History Time  Vicki L. Ruiz, Distinguished Professor of History at the University of California, Irvine, writes, “From carving out frontier communities in the 1700s to writing about citizenship and liberty during the 19th century to fighting for civil rights in the 20th, Latino Americans have made history within and beyond national borders.”
9/24/17 Hong Kong students clash over right to back independence Financial Times  Jeffrey Wasserstrom, a professor of Chinese history at the University of California, Irvine, says that because of the Chinese government’s “enduring paranoid streak” it is likely to respond to the growing talk of independence by cracking down harder. However, that will only make the problem worse, he warns. “If Hong Kong’s autonomy keeps eroding, that will increase the attractiveness for some people in thinking about and using the terminology of independence,” he says.
9/21/17 The Globe and the Kettle The Wall Street Journal  Jeffrey Wasserstrom, chancellor’s professor of history at UCI, writes: “On the whole, though, Ms. Rappaport’s book is one of relevance to us all. Her section on the Opium War highlights the complex ways that a country’s dependence on a commodity, as well as individual addictions to that commodity, can lead to trouble on an international stage” ... “ “A Thirst for Empire” is an excellent resource for those seeking to understand it.”
9/16/17 On Anna Maria Maiolino’s “Entrevidas” Los Angeles Review of Books  Martin Harries, English professor at UC Irvine, [writes], “ANNA MARIA MAIOLINO will perform a piece from 1981, Entrevidas.... The performance will occur during the opening of a retrospective of her work at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, the first in the United States to feature the Brazilian artist, whose work combines the minimal with the surreal, everyday life and the uncanny, in a range of materials.”
9/15/17  The Surfer As Philosopher King Surfer Magazine  Enter Aaron James, UC Irvine philosophy professor, Nias barrel rider, and author of the book Surfing with Sartre: An Aquatic Inquiry into a Life of Meaning. In his book, James explores how we might find true purpose in life through surfing and why the requirements of finely 'attuned' surfing just might improve social, economic, and ecological conditions on our planet.
9/14/17 Serena Williams Welcomes a Daughter, Rebel Wilson Wins Big, Life Advice from Judith Light Fortune UC Irvine professor and writer Erica Hayasaki caught my attention. In an editorial for The Atlantic about motherhood and creativity, she uses research about rats (yes, rats) to contradict the idea that creative work and being a parent are diametrically opposed ....
9/13/17 How Motherhood Affects Creativity The Atlantic  Erika Hayasaki, associate professor in the Literary Journalism Program at UC Irvine, writes: “Whether rodent or human, a mother’s brain requires cognitive, emotional, and behavioral flexibility. “This helps us adapt to new environments.” After all, she added, “flexibility and thinking outside of the box—isn’t that what creativity is?”
9/11/17  Media Advocacy and Struggles Over U.S. Television New Books Network  [Allison] Perlman, an associate professor of film and media students and history at the University of California, Irvine, thus, shows that media law and regulation was an important site of debate and activism.
9/10/17  Catch A Philosophical Wave In 'Surfing With Sartre' NPR "In [UCI Professor of Philosophy] Aaron James' new book, Surfing with Sartre, he uses the surfboard as a vehicle of enlightenment. It seems, at first glance, like a simple task. 'Go with the flow,' after all, might as well be the mantra of both the surfer and the sophist. But there's much more to Surfing with Sartre than that. Erudite yet engaging, the book strikes a winning balance between waxing wise and catching waves."
9/7/17 Asia’s Reckoning by Richard McGregor — power and the Pacific The Financial Times  Jeffery Wasserstrom, professor of history at the University of California, writes: “McGregor helps us appreciate the areas where leaders of the US, Japan and China find it easiest and hardest to find common ground. He also sensitises us to the complex ways in which the ratcheting up or loosening of tensions between Washington and Tokyo or Beijing inevitably affects the strategies of leaders based in the other east Asian capital.”
8/31/17 Sanctuaries Newsday Elizabeth Allen, [UCI] associate professor of English, discusses the history of sanctuaries in England and Europe and how that history plays out in contemporary discussions of sanctuary cities
8/28/17 Strange Bedfellows: Queers, Conservatives, Catholics Los Angeles Review of Books  Jonathan Alexander, Chancellor’s Professor of English at the University of California, Irvine, writes, “Within one week, for instance, I heard on public radio neoconservative Douglas Murray, author of the just released book The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam, cite homophobia as a reason to halt immigration of Muslim refugees from the Middle East, then marveled at an interview with a Jesuit priest, James Martin, who just published his own book with the rather startling title Building a Bridge: How the Catholic Church and the LGBT Community Can Enter into a Relationship of Respect, Compassion, and Sensitivity.”
8/18/17 ‘Surfing With Sartre’: Does Riding a Wave Help Solve Existential Mysteries? The New York Times  Meet Aaron James. He is a professor of philosophy at the University of California, Irvine, and an accomplished surfer. His new book, “Surfing With Sartre,” aims to articulate the distinctive philosophical value of the surfer way of being. His conclusion is bold: “What the surfer knows, in knowing how to ride a wave, bears on questions for the ages — about freedom, control, happiness, society, our relation to nature, the value of work and the very meaning of life.”
8/18/17 Christopher Nolan in Command: The Dunkirk Spirit Fleshed The Los Angeles Review of Books  Jerome Christensen is a professor of English at the University of California Irvine, writes: “Dunkirk is a film of shocking suddenness, visceral impact, and constant fear, all of which the audience is made to feel, as if participants in the miraculous evacuation from the shores of France in May 1940.”
8/17/17 Trump suggested Robert E. Lee and George Washington were on the same level — scholars say they aren't Business Insider  “It’s a ridiculous conflation,” said Professor Alice Fahs of the University of California, Irvine. “He’s not a founding father, and it’s as though Trump thinks he is. It’s really astonishing.  It’s amazing.”
8/16/17 Scholars say Trump went afoul in lumping Lee with founders The Washington Post  Is it really so far-fetched to put Robert E. Lee in the same category as George Washington, as President Donald Trump suggested Tuesday? Many historians say yes. 'It's a ridiculous conflation,' said Professor Alice Fahs of the University of California, Irvine. 'He's not a founding father, and it's as though Trump thinks he is. It's really astonishing. It's amazing.'
8/9/17 Hell Is Other People: Jean-Paul Sartre vs. Surfing, Illustrated Signature  In his new book, Surfing with Sartre, Aaron James ... makes the case that one does have to choose to get out of bed every morning. Throughout Surfing with Sartre, the [UCI] philosophy professor and dedicated surfer James pits the deductions of philosophers against the lessons he’s learned surfing.
8/8/17 How Did Surfing Come to Feel Like an Elite Sport, Anyway? Signature  Aaron James, Professor of Philosophy at UCI, writes: 'Why surf? For the fun of it, of course. But mainly for the reasons why it is joyful – because it’s a sublime and beautiful thing to do in one’s limited time in life.'
8/8/17 Stop Calling Millennials the Facebook Generation. They’re The Student Loan Generation Forward  Annie McClanahan, professor of English at UCI, writes: “If you’re looking for what really distinguishes this generation of college students from past ones, it’s not Facebook and fidget spinners, and or even trigger warnings and “safe spaces. It’s student debt. … Why has student loan debt climbed so high, so fast?”
8/7/17 What is behind Israel's attempt to ban Al Jazeera? Al Jazeera  Mark LeVine, professor of Middle Eastern History at University of California, writes: “The present attempt by the government of Israel to close down Al Jazeera's offices in Jerusalem reflects a potentially far-reaching shift in the perceived power and role of critical media, not just in the Israeli occupation of Palestine, but across the Arab world and larger Middle East and North Africa.”
8/7/17 Avoiding the Trap of Immigration Porn The New York Times  Hector Tobar, associate professor of Chicano/Latino studies at UC Irvine, writes: “See if you can ride along with some agents from Immigration and Customs Enforcement rounding up Latino immigrants, the photo editor tells the photographer. Go capture a group of brown-skinned innocents being led away in cuffs. And if one of the ICE agents is also Latino, the editor adds, so much the better.”

Date Title Outlet Notes
8/1/17 UCI professor publishes surfing philosophy book Daily Pilot  A UC Irvine philosophy professor has written a book about surfing. Aaron James’ book from publisher Doubleday is titled “Surfing with Sartre: An Aquatic Inquiry into a Life of Meaning.” “Written as a conversation with a variety of well-known philosophers, James, a surfer-philosopher himself, finds his main opponent is Jean-Paul Sartre … the French philosopher whose dark existential world views are rebuffed by the surfer’s intrinsic harmony with the state of things.”
7/30/17 Dialectic of Dark Enlightenments: The Alt-Right’s Place in the Culture Industry The Los Angeles Review of Books  Catherine Liu, professor of Film and Media Studies at UC Irvine, writes, “Kill All Normies: Online Culture Wars from 4chan and Tumblr to Trump and the Alt-Right .... [Angela] Nagle’s book, is a highly readable polemical intellectual history of culturalism and the internet; it makes the case that there would be no Trump without the prankster sadism of meme culture. It’s a credit to the book’s critical sophistication that both ends of the identity politics spectrum will feel aggrieved by Nagle’s assessment of their tactics and their politics.”
7/28/17 2 Sinologists say Liu Xiaobo’s Death speaks to a dark vision for China History News Network Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor’s Professor of History at UC Irvine, writes: “Taiwan’s courts have moved to legalize same-sex marriage, while mainland censors try to erase the presence of LGBTQ citizens from the Internet.”
7/25/17 What Liu Xiaobo’s Death Says About China’s Two Futures The Nation  Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor’s Professor of history at UC Irvine, writes: “In mid-January, when Xi Jinping made his debut at Davos, the head of the Chinese Communist Party and president of the PRC took pains to appear as a self-confident leader determined to guide his country into a high-tech, globally interconnected future.”
7/24/17 Welcome to Xi's Net: Where Politics, Porn and Pooh Are Forbidden Bloomberg  For anyone still wondering about China’s ability, or willingness, to control its people’s access to the internet, the past few weeks have provided some clarity. … “It’s a decidedly Orwellian moment for China,’’ says Jeff Wasserstrom, a Chancellor’s Professor of Chinese History at the University of California at Irvine.
7/19/17 Buddhist faculty position coming to UCI Daily Pilot  The School of Humanities at UC Irvine has received a Robert H.N. Ho Family Foundation new professorship in Buddhist studies from the American Council of Learned Societies, according to a news release. The award grants $300,000 to support a Buddhist studies faculty position that will be housed in the UCI Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures and will work with the university’s religious studies program.
7/17/17 CSUF instructor teaches international students to read between the lines Orange County Register  [Teresa X.] Nguyen herself is a keen learner, studying abroad three times. She spent summers in South Korea and Spain while working on her bachelor’s degree in English from UC Irvine. After graduating from UCI in 2007, Nguyen traveled to Qingdao, China in 2008 to observe and teach English classes.
7/11/17 Culture of debt The Times Literary Supplement  [UCI Assistant Professor] Annie McClanahan’s intriguing first book expends considerable effort in search of an appropriate word for this pervasively potent phenomenon. At the most basic and literal level, Dead Pledges is about money-lending. That term is inadequate, however, for the force McClanahan describes is not merely economic but also cultural, subjective and aesthetic.
7/9/17 Cottage Industry: On “Dead Pledges: Debt, Crisis, and Twenty-First-Century Culture” LA Review of Books  In Dead Pledges: Debt, Crisis and Twenty-First-Century American Culture, [UCI Assistant Professor] Annie McClanahan uncovers how cultural production after 2008 registers a new “crisis subjectivity” in the wake of the mortgage meltdown’s shattering revelations. The novels, poems, films, and photography she explores express what few politicians, reporters, or economists have the courage to say: that we are in a “‘terminal crisis’ in which no renewal of capital profitability is possible.”
7/5/17 Touraj Daryaee: Uncovering the Splendor of Ancient Iran The Huffington Post  We examine lives and journeys that have led to significant achievements in the worlds of science, technology, finance, medicine, law, the arts and numerous other endeavors. Our latest interviewee is Touraj Daryaee. Touraj Daryaee is the Maseeh Chair in Persian Studies and the Director of the Dr. Samuel M. Jordan Center for Persian Studies and Culture at the University of California, Irvine.
7/1/17  As Hong Kong Marks Handover Anniversary, A Push And Pull With China Over Identity NPR  Ilaria Maria Sala [and] Jeffrey Wasserstrom, professor of Chinese history at the University of California Irvine, write: “At the same time, the continued presence in Hong Kong of what doesn't – and can't – appear on the mainland shows there's still a gap (if no longer a chasm) between this and other Chinese cities.”
7/1/17  Xi Jinping Warns Hong Kong on Separatism as Marchers Call for Greater Autonomy Time  Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of History at the University of California, Irvine, told TIME that such frank statements painted a 'worrisome' picture for Hong Kong. 'When taken together, the more direct statements, the greater pomp, and the tighter security combined signal a significant ramping up of the intensity and boldness of Beijing's efforts to rein in [Hong Kong's] ability to function as a city that is much freer — not just slightly freer — than any mainland metropolis,' he said.
6/28/17 Higher Education with John B. King, Jr., Michele Siqueiros and Douglas Haynes PBS So Cal - Tavis Smiley Tavis talks with John B. King, Jr., Michele Siqueiros, and Douglas Haynes about higher education as a path to economic opportunity and social mobility …. Douglas Haynes is Vice Provost for Academic Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at UC Irvine, which the New York Times named the nation's 'Top College Doing the Most for the American Dream.' Haynes directed the UC Irvine ADVANCE program, which builds the campus commitment to equity and diversity among faculty and graduate students.
6/27/17 How ‘Harry Potter’ Saved Young Adult Fiction The Huffington Post  Jonathan Alexander, Chancellor’s Professor of English at the University of California, Irvine, said 
despite the challenges posed by Harry’s, and the “Harry Potter” books’, coming of age, he sees it as one of the series’ most powerful draws. “You don’t get a lot of those series such that the readers are growing up with the characters,” he pointed out.
6/24/17 NgÅ©gÄ© wa Thiong’o: The Language Warrior Los Angeles Review of Books  A Distinguished Professor of English and Comparative Literature at UC Irvine, Ngugi as he’s known, won the 2013 UCI Medal and has been a top contender for the Nobel Prize in Literature. He’s also Kenya’s best-known writer. His devotion to his homeland is one reason he’s so pleased with the multiple translations of “The Upright Revolution.”
6/23/17 20 years after J.K. Rowling's first Harry Potter book, students reflect on how it shaped their lives Daily Pilot  Jonathan Alexander, chancellor’s professor of English at UC Irvine who lectures on young adult fiction, said...Though Rowling does tackle issues of intergenerational conflict and being an outsider, Harry Potter “struck a needed tone” with readers on the importance of using “real life magic with the power of imagination to lead a better life.”
6/22/17  Essay: The Trump And Xi Jinping Era: Finding Support In Music And Words The National Book Review  Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor’s Professor of History at UCI, writes: “Late in January, with memories of the trauma of Donald Trump’s rise to power and the exhilaration of joining a massive crowd at L.A.’s Women’s March fresh in my mind, I found myself continually listening to two songs.  They were both ones I had enjoyed listening to before, but each had suddenly taken on new meanings.”
6/14/17 1963 | Sukiyaki by Kyu Sakamo PBS Elaine Kathryn Andres, a musician, record collector, and third-year doctoral student in the program in Culture & Theory, writes: “'Sukiyaki' has been born again (and again) as a song about lost love. And while these renditions typically hint (in inevitably reductive ways) at the tune’s Japanese origins, they obscure the song’s much deeper geopolitical history.”
6/5/17 Accepting the apartheid label will normalize Israel Aljazeera Mark LeVine, professor of history, writes: “In this context, far from singling out Israel, the apartheid label would normalize it, allowing the same broad range of strategies that have worked elsewhere to be deployed here, giving Israelis and Palestinians alike new tools to fight for a peaceful, just and democratic future for all the country's inhabitants.”
5/31/17 The Top Five TV Showrunners in the Business TV Over Mind In this article, David Benioff, alumni of the MFA in Creative Writing program, is mentioned for his co-creative work on Game of Thrones.
5/30/17 O.C. Supervisors' decision to expand detention program overlooks jail conditions (Opinion) Daily Pilot Tina Shull, lecturer in the Department of History, writes, “It is time to pass California’s Senate Bill 29, ‘the Dignity Not Detention Act,’ which would make the standards enforceable statewide, including four immigration detention centers run by private prison corporations.”
5/29/17 Shelf Awareness: New, notable and buzz-worth books for June Orange County Register Charmaine Craig, alumna from the MFA Program in Writing, paints an intimate portrait of one family’s struggle during World War II and the Burmese civil war in her second novel, Miss Burma
5/24/17 Damaging Words: On “Thirteen Reasons Why” Los Angeles Review of Books Jonathan Alexander, Chancellor's Professor of English and director of UCI Center for Excellence in Writing & Communication, explores the Netflix adaptation, '13 Reasons Why.'
5/15/17 Journalist to Join UCI Faculty Orange County Business Journal Hector Tobar, an author and New York Times contributing op-ed columnist, will be an associate professor in Chicano/Latino studies and English-literary journalism.
5/3/17 2017 Annual Symposium: Reconstruction The U.S. Capitol Historical Society The U.S. Capitol Historical Society will present its annual symposium May 11 and 12 on Capitol Hill. Brook Thomas, Chancellor's Professor of English, will join other scholars from around the country in exploring the post-Civil War period in “Congress Begins to Reconstruct the Nation.”
4/28/17 What General Motors Did To Flint Jalopnik Following World War II, the automaker pursued a corporate strategy that centered on shifting the means of production to the suburbs and away from urban cores, according to Andrew Highsmith, assistant professor of history.
4/23/17 An Interview with Ngugi wa Thiong’o Los Angeles Review of Books Ngugi Wa Thiong'o, Distinguished Professor of comparative literature,  is interviewed by Nanda Dyssou, Congolese-Hungarian journalist and fiction writer in Los Angeles.
4/18/17 How a single gene could become a volume knob for human suffering Wired Erika Hayasaki, associate professor of literary journalism, introduces us to individuals on the opposite sides of the pain spectrum: one who is in constant, agonizing pain; another who has never felt any. Their genetic mutations share a commonality that could potentially end America's opioid epidemic.
4/13/17 The next big thing in tourism could be Little Saigon Orange County Register Linda Vo, professor of Asian American studies, said even though she sees a change in the community toward more openness she doubts Little Saigon will turn into another Little Tokyo.
4/9/27 Decolonising Faith: Here's How Some Africans Are Rediscovering Their Ancestors And Spirituality The Huffington Post Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Distinguished Professor of comparative literature, is described in the article as the 'mascot for the project of decolonisation.'
3/31/17 'A Literary Field Guide' blends poems and stories into 'a kaleidoscopic picture' of O.C. Los Angeles Times Now anyone can get a glimpse into this history with 'Orange County: A Literary Field Guide,' edited by Alvarez and Andrew Tonkovich, lecturer in the Department of English.
3/24/17 'Amazing stories of survival': UCI oral history project preserves Vietnamese refugees' hopes, fears and challenges Los Angeles Times 'Even today, there's very little history on Vietnamese Americans from their perspective and their voices,' said Linda Trinh Vo, professor of Asian American studies. 'In Vietnam, they have basically written us out of the history books — those who left the country — and in America, they write about the war from the American side, particularly the veteran side, but very little about Vietnamese Americans.'
3/20/17 What would MLK do if he were alive today: Six essential reads The Conversation As doctoral candidate in Visual Studies, Mary Schmitt explains, Selma was “a moment in civil rights history that played a crucial role in the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.”
3/19/17 Travel Ban Dampens Persian New Year Celebration New York Times Touraj Daryaee, a professor of history and director of the Center for Persian Studies, highlights the caution that many students are taking in returning home for Nowruz.
3/19/17 Gorsuch, a Conservative Firebrand in College, Evolved Into a Conciliator MSN Originally run in the Wall Street Journal, Irene Tucker, professor of English, explains, 'He was committed to showing the way he was a freethinker and everyone else was conforming to the lockstep liberalism of the campus.”
3/19/17 What did the UN apartheid report expose in reality? Aljazeera Mark Le Vine, professor of history, reveals, “As Israel moves towards confronting apartheid, the questions raised by the report will become impossible to avoid.”
3/19/17 Gorsuch, a Conservative Firebrand in College, Evolved Into a Conciliator The Wall Street Journal Irene Tucker, professor of English, explains, 'He was committed to showing the way he was a freethinker and everyone else was conforming to the lockstep liberalism of the campus.”
3/17/17 Trump’s budget cripples the EPA’s ability to keep drinking water safe Vox Andrew Highsmith, assistant professor of history, says, “If you look at the history of the Flint water crisis, the problems didn’t stem from too much enforcement at the federal level, but the opposite — too little.”
3/15/17 UC Irvine Professor Vicki Ruiz Pioneered the Study of Mexican-American Women—and Isn't Done OC Weekly 'Ruiz is a giant in American history for doing something academia never bothered with until she came along: show that Mexican-American women in the past had lives outside of making babies and cooking,' says OC Weekly writer Gustavo Arellano about Vicki Ruiz, Distinguished Professor of history and Chicano/Latino studies.
3/4/17 What would Mark Twain think of Donald Trump? Time Originally run in The Conversation, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, asks, “Thanks to the criticisms they’ve leveled in articles, interviews, tweets and letters to the editor, we know that many contemporary authors, from Philip Roth to J.K. Rowling, have a dim view of Donald J. Trump. But what would leading writers of the past have made of him?”
3/3/17 9 of the most powerful quotes from Ngugi wa Thiong'o's public lecture The Huffington Post Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Distinguished Professor of comparative literature, delivered a lecture titled 'Secure the Base, Decolonise the Mind' at Wits University on Thursday evening.
3/2/17 What would Mark Twain think of Donald Trump? The Conversation Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, asks, “Thanks to the criticisms they’ve leveled in articles, interviews, tweets and letters to the editor, we know that many contemporary authors, from Philip Roth to J.K. Rowling, have a dim view of Donald J. Trump. But what would leading writers of the past have made of him?”
3/1/17 The WWII plan to mess with the Japanese by dyeing Mt. Fuji Atlas Obscura David Fedman, assistant professor of history, explains the late-WWII bombing campaigns against Japan: 'Mt. Fuji was cast by the Japaneseas an alpine feature that bound the swelling imperial sphere together.'
3/1/17 China’s battle to breathe NewStatesman Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, explains, 'In China, what really can motivate people are much more tangible things that affect their daily life.”
3/3/17 Pre-fascism & the Muslim question Frontline Aijaz Ahmad, Chancellor’s professor of comparative literature, writes, 'Islamophobia and a broad hatred of the non-white immigrant seem to be the two key themes in the early days of the presidency, as they were during the campaign. But the storm of opposition will also be great.'
2/19/17 Trump widens a generation gap in Vietnamese community: Older hard-liners vs. liberal youths Los Angeles Times 'The elders may be openly supporting Trump and the Republicans because they still feel an affinity for the party they view as fighting against the government that took over their homeland,” says Linda Vo, professor of Asian American studies.
2/15/17 Chinese students in the US are using “inclusion” and “diversity” to oppose a Dalai Lama graduation speech Quartz “If there were an objection to the Dalai Lama speaking on campus 10 years ago, you would not have seen the objection from Chinese students being framed within the rhetoric of diversity and inclusion,” says Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's professor of history.
2/13/17 Despite harsh rhetoric, Trump re-affirms 'one-China' policy with President Xi Southern California Public Radio Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's professor of history, speaks about President Donald Trump's reverse course on longstanding policy recognizing Beijing's authority in the region.
2/8/17 Despite Trump’s isolationism, China isn’t ready to become the world’s moral leader The Huffington Post Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor’s professor of history, writes, 'President Donald’s Trump’s rise is proving to be a boon for China. His first presidential actions and undiplomatic style have opened a void in global leadership.'
2/5/17 Chinese cuisine starting to whet more American appetites Yibada Chinese restaurateurs have been trying to offer Chinese food as fine dining; but their efforts have remained largely unsuccessful until recently,” says Yong Chen, professor of history.
2/2/17 South Korea moves to curb presidential powers after Park scandal San Francisco Examiner “South Korea is no stranger to crises, which usually have the effect of re-concentrating power at the center,” writes David Fedman, assistant professor of history.
2/2/17 Hills Happenings: History professor to tell story behind 'Fahrenheit 451' Orange County Register Kai Evers, professor of German, will discuss the historical event that was the basis for Bradbury’s book, Fahrenheit 451.
2/1/17 Chinese cuisine evolves in U.S. as a matter of taste ECNS Yong Chen, professor of history, explains, 'Chinese restaurateurs have been trying to offer Chinese food as fine dining; but their efforts have remained largely unsuccessful until recently.'
1/31/17 South Korea moves to curb president’s power after park scandal Bloomberg 'The same is true with suggestions to give more power to regions even though South Korea’s “highly centralized” decision-making process has “enhanced perceptions of a seemingly monarchical ‘court politics’ in the Blue House,” writes David Fedman, assistant professor of history.
1/31/17 There are echoes of China in today's America Time Jeffrey Wasserstrom, chancellor's professor of history, writes, 'We are troubled by how often lately we experience a strange sort of China-related déjà vu when following events in the U.S.'
1/27/17 Go behind the scenes as fortune cookie history gets made Time In this article, Yong Chen, professor of history, explains the curious history of fortune cookies. 'American Protestant missionaries stationed in the south of China spread word of what was happening on the other side of the Pacific, and adventurous Chinese men were lured to America by the prospect of gold.'
1/27/17 Even Trump’s most loyal fans say he can be abrasive and rude. Is it part of his success? (Audio) PRI Aaron James, professor of philosophy, poses viewing Donald Trump’s behavior not as liability but as appeal, perhaps even a key reason he was elected.
1/24/17 UC Irvine student experiences life as sports journalist Orange County Register This article features UC Irvine journalism student Caitlin Antonios. OC Register writer Eric Morgan describes her, saying, 'There was never any doubt that being a journalist is what she wanted to do for a living.'
1/18/17 9 questions about China you were too embarrassed to ask Vox Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's professor of history, writes, “You have propaganda videos coming out that are talking about America as an evil country trying to use conspiratorial plans to bring about the downfall of the Chinese Communist Party – but it’s still is a place that Communist Party leaders are sending their children to go to school.'
1/18/17 In China, pollution fears are both literal and metaphorical (Commentary) NPR Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's professor of history, discusses artists in Chengdu and their actions against China's pollution.
1/16/2017 Is Al sexist? Foreign Policy Erika Hayasaki, associate professor in the UCI Literary Journalism Program, writes, 'In the not-so-distant future, artificial intelligence will be smarter than humans. But as the technology develops, absorbing cultural norms from its creators and the internet, it will also be more racist, sexist, and unfriendly to women.'
1/13/17 What can Ivanka Trump possibly do for women who work? The Nation Amy Wilentz, professor of English, writes, 'For all the talk of how Ivanka has her father’s ear, on women’s issues or any other... he doesn’t listen to her. In interview after interview, she’s been clear about how little interest Trump has in her opinion.'
1/12/2017 Trump through Chinese eyes (Opinion) The Japan Times Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom, Chancellor's professor of history, writes, 'China no longer needs U.S. protection. Instead, it wants a U.S. president who is occupied largely with domestic issues, and is not much concerned with constraining China’s rise, as Barack Obama was.'
1/12/17 Interview | Jeffrey Wasserstrom (Audio) National Committee on U.S. China Relations In this podcast interview, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, discusses relations between China and America in the dawning era of Xi and Trump.
1/10/17 Trump through Chinese eyes Project-Syndicate Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's professor of history, discusses China's response to our recent election and the attitude of China toward a president who isn't as concerned with constraining China's rise.
1/9/17 Culture-defining iPhone turns 10 today USA Today 'The engineering is in the background, so the front end is really easy to use, with just a swipe or a poke of the finger,' says Peter Krapp, professor of film & media studies.
1/9/17 Historians in the age of Trump Inside Higher Ed Vicki Ruiz, Distinguished Professor of history and Chicano studies, traced Trump’s rise to two familiar phenomena: nativism and gender discrimination.
1/4/17 Doubt trumping Chinese support for president-elect Orange County Register “There’s a fundamental confidence among Chinese Americans that the U.S. is stable, politically and socially,” said Yong Chen, professor of history.
1/4/17 The Oxford Illustrated History of Modern China (Video) China File Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor’s Professor of history is the editor of The Oxford Illustrated History of Modern China. He describes the book in a video interview.
1/1/17 The counterintuitive critics (PDF) The Chronicle of Higher Education Michael Szalay, professor of English, is described as taking one of the 'central roles in the field.'