Course Descriptions

Term:

Fall Quarter (F18)

Dept/Description Course No., Title  Instructor
ART HIS (F18)100  IRAN AND IMPERIAL EXCHANGES IN EURASIAN LATE ANTIQUITYSTAFF
Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1), World Religious Traditions (Category 2)

This course explores the role of Iran in the visual, material and intellectual exchanges among the great settled, nomadic and mercantile empires of late antiquity (ca. 200-700 CE), a pivotal period of interconnection and transformation in Eurasian history. We will investigate the art, architecture, urbanism and visualities of empire in the settled empires, such as Sasanian Iran, Rome and China, and steppe powers such as the Huns and Türks, as well as smaller states on the peripheries and interstices in Western Europe, Central and South Asia, and Africa enmeshed in these imperial struggles and intrigues. Topics include the growth and competition in images and ideologies of sacred kingship; transformations of Eurasian visual cultures through long distance diplomacy and commerce; magical and astrological practices and lore; and the formation of new liturgical spaces for imperial or universalizing religions such as Christianity, Buddhism, and Iranian religions such as Zoroastrianism and Manichaeism.
Days: TU TH  12:30-01:50 PM

ART HIS (F18)40A  ANC EGYPT GRC ROMEMILES, M.
Emphasis/Category: Thematic Approaches to Religion (Category 3)

In this course we start with a brief look at prehistoric cave painting and megaliths, and move on to the art of the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece and Rome, with a focus on the early cultures around the Mediterranean Sea. We study famous works of art and architecture such as the Great Pyramids and Sphinx, the Palace of Minos at Knossos, the Parthenon, the Venus de Milo and Winged Victory, Pompeii, and the Colosseum and Pantheon in Rome: a selection of the art and architecture of the past admired and studied by people for many centuries or in some instances only recently excavated. We consider how and why the peoples of antiquity created art and architecture, how the visual arts can illuminate cultural issues, and how ancient art takes on various meanings to us today. Some attention is given to archaeological methods, and the issues of ownership, conservation and presentation of ancient artifacts.
Days: MO WE  10:00-10:50 AM

ART HIS (F18)42D  ARTS OF ISLAMPATEL, A.
Emphasis/Category: Thematic Approaches to Religion (Category 3)

This course examines the past and present of Islam through its art and architecture, spanning 1500 years and encompassing the Americas through Indonesia. The course emphasizes that, since its emergence on the Arabian peninsula in the early 7th century, Islam has been a force for connecting different world regions and their people in commercial, ideological, artistic and religious dialogues – globalization, in the modern sense. At the same time that we examine what is “Islamic” about objects labeled as such, we will also address their regional specificities, confronting and redefining the very idea of what is “Islamic” in the process.
Days: MO WE  12:00-01:20 PM

CLASSIC (F18)45A  THE GODSGIANNOPOULOU, Z.
Emphasis/Category: World Religious Traditions (Category 2)

Classics 45A is the first part of a three-quarter course on Classical Mythology. This class will be an introduction to the most important Greek and Roman myths, their historical and religious context, various interpretations and influence upon ancient and modern art, film and literature. Some of the topics we will discuss are: the creation of the universe, relations between gods and mortals, gender and sexuality, love, marriage, death and afterlife. We will use a standard textbook, but we will also read selected passages from primary sources such as Hesiod's Theogony, Ovid's Metamorphoses and selections from Greek tragedy. The course will make regular use of ancillary visual materials, especially computer resources. The grade for this course will be based on a combination of multiple-choice quizzes and short essay exams. Classics 45A is the first part of the Classical Mythology series (45ABC), which satisfies the Humanities General Education Requirement IV.
Days: MO WE  10:00-10:50 AM

HISTORY (F18)131B  ANCIENT PERSIADARYAEE, T.
Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1), Thematic Approaches to Religion (Category 3)

How does the legacy of human evolution affect our world today?  How have technological innovations shaped human societies?  How have human societies explained the natural world and their place in it?  Given the abundance of religious beliefs in the world, how have three evangelical faiths spread far beyond their original homelands?
This class follows the major themes of world historical development through the sixteenth century to consider how developments in technology, social organization, and religion—from the origins of farming to the rise of Christianity—shaped the world we live in today.
(Satisfies Pre-1800 Requirement)
(IV, VIII)
Days: TU TH  02:00-03:20 PM

HISTORY (F18)70B  MONSTERS & BORDERSMCLOUGHLIN, N.
Emphasis/Category: Thematic Approaches to Religion (Category 3)

Problems in History (Europe) provides an introduction to the historical problems, the issues of interpretation, the use of primary sources, and the historical scholarship of the history of Europe with an emphasis on developing skills in historical essay-writing. This particular iteration of History 70B, Monsters and Borders, will focus upon the historical problem of monsters. Monsters (particularly human-animal or human-demon hybrids) of varying types appear regularly in otherwise serious works of European literature, political polemic, and geography written between c. 450 BCE and 1700 CE. In order to better understand the role played by the horrific and fantastic in the unfolding historical events and their recollection, this class will explore how different European communities used the portrayal of monsters to define the boundaries of their communities, understand the unknown, reinterpret the past, promote religious and/or intellectual reform, and establish hierarchical political orders.
(IV, VIII)
(Satisfies Pre-1800 Requirement)
Days: MO WE  11:00-11:50 AM

HISTORY (F18)70E  3 RELIGNS 3000 YRSLEHMANN, M.
Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1)

This course explores the history of Jerusalem, a holy city for Jews, Christians, and Muslims alike, from ancient Biblical times to the present. In a sense, this is a global history of Western culture on a small scale, and we will be looking at the religious and political history of Jews, Christians, and Muslims and their encounter with one another, focusing on a specific place but pursuing the story over a long period of time. Topics will include the role of Jerusalem in the Bible, the Second Temple Period and Jerusalem under Roman rule; the birth of Christianity, the incorporation of Jerusalem into the Islamic world, and the period of the Crusades; Jerusalem under Ottoman rule and the British mandate; and, finally, the history of Jerusalem since the establishment of the State of Israel and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Final grades will be based on a midterm and final exam, a final paper, as well as participation and short assignments in the discussion section. We will use  Karen Armstrong, Jerusalem: One City, Three Faiths, as our text book. Primary source readings will be made available on EEE.
(IV, VIII)
Satisfies Pre-1800 Requirement
Days: TU TH  12:30-01:50 PM

ITALIAN (F18)150  HOLOCAUST IN ITALYCHIAMPI, J.
Emphasis/Category: Thematic Approaches to Religion (Category 3)

This course will concern itself with the response to the Holocaust in the memoirs of Primo Levi and Liana Millu, and in the fiction of Giorgio Bassani. Framing their writings will be brief readings in the work of historians Liliana Picciotto Fargion, Michele Sarfatti and Susan Zuccotti.

Italy had no native tradition of anti-Semitism to compare with the French or Austrian (Action Française; Karl Lueger’s Christian Social Party). Moreover, the Holocaust in Italy begins comparably late–in 1943 with the overthrow of Mussolini–and continued with the consent of the Republic of Salò, the largely puppet state the Germans set up for him after his rescue. The class will briefly address such historical questions as the relation between Italian Fascism and anti-Semitism, the role and responsibility of the Papacy in the eventual deportations, and, finally, the heroism of Italian individuals and even institutions (the diplomatic corps) in the face of unspeakable atrocity. In Levi and Millu we shall address more literary questions: Italian identity, for example. What did it mean to be an Italian Jew in the camps– hence Sephardic–thus to speak no Yiddish and not to be observant, i.e. to be both culturally and religiously ignorant? On the other hand, what did it mean for an Italian Jew to be cultured and completely assimilated to Italian life: “tutti dottori, tutti avvocati” unlike Austrian, Hungarian and Russian Jews? We will study the development of the identity of the protagonist as s/he struggles to survive in the Italy of the race laws and then in the inconceivable conditions of Auschwitz. Incidentally, according to Liliana Picciotto Fargion, the total number of Jews deported was 8,613 or whom 7,631 died. She adds 291 who were murdered in Italy; this out of approximately 43,000 Jews. All readings are in English.
Days: MO WE  02:00-02:50 PM

Courses Offered by the Religious Studies Minor or other Schools at UCI

Fall Quarter (F18)

Dept Course No., Title   Instructor
REL STD (F18)5A  WORLD RELIGIONS IMCKENNA, J.

This is a lecture course (with required discussion sections) on monotheistic religions, surveying key historical events, major figures, basic ideas, essential practices, significant texts, notable artifacts, and important trends in scholarship concerning the religions under review. The class presumes no prior knowledge of these traditions and has no prerequisites; it fulfills requirements for the History major, the Religious Studies major and minor, and satisfies General Education categories IV (Arts and Humanities) or VIII (International/Global Issues). Three textbooks (one for each religion) and three essayistic in-class tests (one for each religion).  Weekly short, typed essays to facilitate small group discussions. Note that the study of religion at University is academic, not devotional.
Days: MO WE  11:00-11:50 AM

REL STD (F18)17  ECON APPR TO RELIGMCBRIDE, M.

Emphasis/Category: Thematic Approaches to Religion (Category 3)
Introduction to how basic economic concepts such as demand, supply, consumption, production, competition, free-riding, innovation, regulation, and rent-seeking can be applied to understand observed religious behavior. Same as Economics 17.
Days: TU TH  09:30-10:50 AM

INTL ST (F18)179  DEMOCRACY AND ISLAMPETROVIC, B.

Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1)
Days: T TH  03:30-04:50 PM

SOC SCI (F18)189  DEMOCRACY AND ISLAMPETROVIC, B.

Emphasis/Category: Judaism/Christianity/Islam (Category 1)
Days: T TH  03:30-04:50 PM

SOCIOL (F18)56  RELIGION AND SOCIETYMAZUMDAR, S.

Emphasis/Category: Thematic Approaches to Religion (Category 3)
Days: MWF  11:00-11:50 AM