Term:  

Winter Quarter

Dept Course No and Title Instructor
PHILOS (W18)1  INTRO TO PHILOSOPHYPRITCHARD, D.
This course provides a general introduction to the main topics in philosophy. The topics covered include: Ethics, Political Philosophy, Aesthetics, Epistemology, Philosophy of Mind, Metaphysics, Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of Religion, and The Meaning of Life.

(IV)
PHILOS (W18)2  PUZZLES & PARADOXESBERNECKER, S.
Can God create a stone too heavy for Him to lift? Could you go back in time and kill your grandfather before he met your grandmother? Is the statement "This statement is false" true or false? Can you know that there will be a surprise exam in this course? Could a single hair make the difference between a bald an a non-bald person? Can a white tennis shoe confirm the claim that all ravens are black? Is it possible to know every truth? Philosophical puzzles and paradoxes like these threaten our basic understanding of central concepts such as space, time, motion, infinity, truth, knowledge, and belief. This course focuses on philosophical puzzles and paradoxes as a way to introduce the formal tools needed to comprehend and evaluate philosophical arguments and theories, as well as theoretical reasoning more generally. A puzzle is a phenomenon that seems not to conform to received theories within some domain. A paradox is an unacceptable conclusion derived by apparently acceptable reasoning from apparently acceptable premises. The puzzles and paradoxes discussed in the course serve as an introduction to (among other things) the philosophy of space and time, the nature of the infinite, explanation, vagueness, knowledge and the rationality of action and belief. 

(IV, Vb)
PHILOS (W18)4  INTRO TO ETHICSBENCIVENGA, E.
An analysis of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Grades will be based on a midterm and a final, both consisting of study questions that will be given to students at the beginning of the course.

(IV)
PHILOS (W18)10  HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHYPERIN, C.
This course is an introduction to the history of ancient Greek philosophy. We will focus on a set of questions about happiness and the good life for a human being. What is happiness? What, if anything, must a person believe about the world in order to be happy? What sort of character must one have, and how must one treat other people, in order to be happy? We will examine the views of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, and the Stoics on a range of philosophical topics relevant to these questions about happiness.  

(IV)
PHILOS (W18)13  HIST CONTEM PHILOSHELMREICH, J.
A study of recent philosophical developments in Anglo-American and Continental philosophy with readings from such figures as Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Quine, Heidegger, and Sartre.

Prerequisite: Recommended: PHILOS 12.

(IV)
PHILOS (W18)29  CRITICAL REASONINGSTAFF
Visit the Logic and Philosophy of Science website for more information.

Same as LPS 29
PHILOS (W18)30  INTR SYMBOLIC LOGICSTAFF
Visit the Logic and Philosophy of Science website for more information.

Same as LPS 29
PHILOS (W18)102W  INTRO TO KNOWLEDGECOLIVA, A.
The course will introduce students to two forms of skepticism, the Cartesian and the Humean, and will present some of the main contemporary anti-skeptical strategies. In particular, we will study the writings of Putnam, Nozick, DeRose, G. E. Moore, Pryor, McDowell, Strawson and Wright.
The course will also teach students how to write a philosophy paper, through a series of intermediate assignments, such as summaries, argument reconstructions and argument evaluations.   

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing Requirement. 
Overlaps with PHILOS 102, LPS 102.
PHILOS (W18)103  INTR TO MORAL PHILOSOPHYHELMREICH, J.
Righting Wrongs and Fixing Harms. When is it wrong to harm people? How should we make up for it? The course will explore these questions, guided by Aristotle, Locke, Kant, and contemporary thinkers, and by examples from everyday life and today’s headlines.
PHILOS (W18)105B  METALOGICGALEBACH, J.
Visit the Logic and Philosophy of Science website for more information.
PHILOS (W18)108  BAYESIAN EPISTEMHUTTEGGER, S.
Visit the Logic and Philosophy of Science website for more information.
PHILOS (W18)110  PHILOSOPHY &TRAGEDYPERIN, C.
Plato thought that tragedy was bad for soul, and for this reason he banished it from his ideal city. In this course we'll examine Plato's objections to tragedy and Aristotle's response to those objections. Readings include Euripides' Medea, Plato's Republic, Sophocles' Oedipus the King, and Aristotle's Poetics

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times as topics vary.
PHILOS (W18)123  PHIL OF RELIGIONBENCIVENGA, E.
Critical examination of concepts involved in the theological literature, e.g., the nature and existence of God, miracles, the problem of evil, divine command theories in ethics.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.
PHILOS (W18)142W  WRITING/PHIL OF BIOAYALA, F.
Visit the Logic and Philosophy of Science website for more information.
PHILOS (W18)144  TOPICS PHIL SOC SCIGILBERT, M.
Selected topics in the philosophy of the social sciences, e.g., is their goal to understand behavior or to predict and control it?; are they normative and the natural sciences not?; do they incorporate philosophical doctrines about language and mind?.   

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary. 

Same as LPS 144.