Term:  

Fall Quarter

Dept Course No and Title Instructor
PHILOS (F18)201  FIRST YEAR SEMINARPRITCHARD, D.
This is a research training course geared specifically for first-year graduate students and taught by the Director of Graduate Studies. The specific content covered will be tailored to the research interests of the students enrolled on the course. The goal of the course is to provide a solid foundation for a successful Ph.D.
PHILOS (F18)205A  SET THEORYSTAFF
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PHILOS (F18)206  MODAL LOGICWALSH, S.
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PHILOS (F18)206  PROOF THEORYWALSH, S.
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PHILOS (F18)213  DESCARTES, MALEBRANCHE, AND LEIBNIZGREENBERG, S.
Descartes, Malebranche, and Leibniz Pierre Bayle called Nicolas Malebranche "the greatest philosopher of his age."  In the first part of the course, we'll examine whether, and in what respect(s) which Malebranche was a Cartesian, by examining Malebranche's chief metaphysical and epistemological views in relation to Descartes.  In the second part of the course, we'll examine certain of Leibniz's most distinctive metaphysical and epistemological views, and also consider Leibniz's responses to Malebranche's main metaphysical and epistemological claims.
PHILOS (F18)215  WITTGENSTEIN IMADDY, P.
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PHILOS (F18)230  TOPICS IN ETHICSHELMREICH, J.
Professors Jeff Helmreich and David Smith.

We shall study ways in which our sense of self and other is manifest in everyday experience (phenomenology) and in our constitution of values (ethics).

We’ll draw on texts from Edmund Husserl (founder of phenomenology) and Emanuel Levinas (founder of a phenomenological meta-ethics). We’ll also draw on Edith Stein on empathy. And we’ll work with contemporary work on these authors and problems.

For Husserl, “we” constitute values intersubjectively in the interplay between “I” and “you” (“an other I”). For Levinas, the “face of the other” is fundamental to our consciousness and to our sense of moral worth (moving from “other” to “me”). Where Husserl takes phenomenology to be First Philosophy (rather than metaphysics or epistemology or logic), Levinas takes ethics to be First Philosophy, founded on our sense of the other.
PHILOS (F18)232  TOPICS POL&SOC PHILJAMES, A.
Speech Ethics: This seminar considers a set of interrelated philosophical questions about speech and its linguistic, epistemic, ethical, and political dimensions.  Topics include speech act theory (Austin, Searle, Stalnaker, Lewis, Kaplan); slurs and pejoratives (Camp, Jeshion, Langton, Maitra); silencing, ancient and modern (Beard); gaslighting, mansplaining, misogyny, epistemic injustice (Fricker, Goldberg, Manne); bullshitting, lying, propaganda (Frankfurt, Stanley, Shiffrin); free speech and the speech commons (Shiffrin); pubic reason and prospects for democracy (Rawls, Habermas).  Our discussion will be in the service of a book in progress called Loudmouthed Women, co-authored with classicist Cristiana Sogno).
PHILOS (F18)244  SOCIAL DYNAMICSNARENS, L.
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