Cross Listed Med Humanities Course Descriptions within Humanities

Term:

Winter Quarter (W18)

Dept/Description Course No., Title  Instructor
AFAM (W18)157  CRITICAL RACE THRYHAN, S.
EURO ST (W18)101A  THE BODY AT THE RENAISSANCE: TEXT AND IMAGEFREI, P.

The Renaissance not only rediscovered the artistic, literary and philosophical creations of the Ancients which still haunt our modernity, but it also revived our knowledge of the human body. It was the time of both decisive innovations in modern medicine – especially anatomy – and fantastic re-imaginations of the human form and the aesthetic, social and philosophical orders it represents. This course will focus on how early modern writers (namely Rabelais and Montaigne) as well as artists (Da Vinci, Bosch, Brueghel), thinkers (Erasmus) and physicians (Vesalius, Paré) recreated the human body and its forms in order to figure (out) the new world to which the Renaissance gave birth.
Course materials will be made available on Canvas at the beginning of the quarter.  
French 150/Euro St 101A





Days: TU TH  02:00-03:20 PM

FRENCH (W18)150  THE BODY AT THE RENAISSANCE: TEXT AND IMAGEFREI, P.

The Renaissance not only rediscovered the artistic, literary and philosophical creations of the Ancients which still haunt our modernity, but it also revived our knowledge of the human body. It was the time of both decisive innovations in modern medicine – especially anatomy – and fantastic re-imaginations of the human form and the aesthetic, social and philosophical orders it represents. This course will focus on how early modern writers (namely Rabelais and Montaigne) as well as artists (Da Vinci, Bosch, Brueghel), thinkers (Erasmus) and physicians (Vesalius, Paré) recreated the human body and its forms in order to figure (out) the new world to which the Renaissance gave birth.  Course materials will be made available on Canvas at the beginning of the quarter. 

French 150/Euro St 101A


Days: TU TH  02:00-03:20 PM

GEN&SEX (W18)157B  QUEER LIVES KNOWLEDTERRY, J.
LIT JRN (W18)101BW  NARRATIVES OF SCIENCE AND THE MINDHAYASAKI, E.

In narrative journalism, we often emphasize getting to the emotional core of the people we write about. But what about writing narratives that try to unravel the mysteries of emotions themselves? In this class, we will read about the science of behavior and the mind. We will consider stories about neurological disorders like schizophrenia, autism, Alzheimer’s, and perhaps some that you have never heard of like mass psychogenic illness (which led to a ticking outbreak among cheerleaders), or Morgellons Disease (which can be blamed for extreme itching), or body integrity disorder (in which a person might become obsessed with cutting off his arm). We will explore questions like what drives human behavior? Can emotions like shame or empathy be pinpointed to a particular part of the brain? What if memories can be planted? Or what if a sociopath is just born like that? How do these questions complicate the law? Such scientific discoveries could change the way journalists write crime narratives like In Cold Blood, particularly when we get into questions like: Does the brain dictate behavior? Is it our genes? Or can morality still be boiled down to the choices we make? Although we will be asking big universal questions that will help drive our narratives, we will still seek stories that address these topics through literary journalism, with characters, scenes and tension. Who are the people behind these disorders and discoveries—the scientists, patients, families, or defendants? Each student will be responsible for writing and reporting a science-inspired narrative as a final paper.
Days: TH  02:00-04:50 PM

Courses Offered by Med Humanities or other Schools at UCI

Winter Quarter (W18)

Dept Course No., Title   Instructor
MED HUM (W18)1  HLTH WELLNESS BODYIMADA, A.

Asks what is health and who gets to have it? What is considered a “healthy” or “sick” body? We analyze historical and contemporary experiences of illness, medicine, and caregiving, including how patients represent their bodies and healing.
rn(GE III or IV ).
Days: MO WE  09:00-10:20 AM

MED HUM (W18)C178  CRITICAL RACE THRYHAN, S.

Introduction to Critical Race Theory and key American cases on racial inequality. Using this literature, examines the possibilities and pitfalls of legal claims of race, gender, and sexuality discrimination in the age of colorblindness.

Same as AFAM 157.
Restriction: Juniors only.

ANTHRO (W18)128B  RACE GENDER&SCIENCESTAFF

Perfect for pre-health, science and social science majors wanting to appreciate how science and society interact. Race and gender as biological and socio-cultural constructs are examined. Questions explored: What is disease? What is science? What are social and biological differences.

Same as CHC/LAT 176.
(VII)

ANTHRO (W18)134A  MEDICAL ANTHROHAMDY, S.

Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world.

Same as CHC/LAT 178A.
(VIII)

ANTHRO (W18)139  MED ETHICS SOC ACTNPETERSON, K.

Studies in selected areas of Cultural and Psychological Anthropology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CHC/LAT (W18)176  RACE GENDER&SCIENCESTAFF

Perfect for pre-health, science and social science majors wanting to appreciate how science and society interact. Race and gender as biological and socio-cultural constructs are examined. Questions explored: What is disease? What is science? What are social and biological differences.

Same as ANTHRO 128B.

CHC/LAT (W18)178A  MEDICAL ANTHROHAMDY, S.

Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world.

Same as ANTHRO 134A.