Cross Listed Med Humanities Course Descriptions within Humanities

Term:

Fall Quarter (F18)

Dept/Description Course No., Title  Instructor
CLASSIC (F18)160  MADNESS ON STAGEGIANNOPOULOU, Z.

In this course we will examine various modes of dramatic representation of madness from invisibility to full presence, spanning three continents (Europe, the US, and Africa), and ranging from the 5th century BCE to the 20th century CE. We will look at madness as a medical condition, a form of divine punishment, a sociopolitical weapon, a manifestation of hereditary guilt, and a sign of existential angst. We begin with tragic and comic portrayals of madness in classical Greece, where insanity is sent by the gods and felt as a subjective affliction barely observable through physical behavior and linguistic use. We then move to Shakespeare’s Hamlet and look at madness as mental aberration and as feigned posture. With Ibsen and Strindberg we are faced with the social ramifications of madness as a condition that afflicts the common people, refers to women in their rebellion against patriarchal society, and serves as a metaphor for diseased family dynamics or as a sign of retribution. Pirandello plumbs the depths of both tragedy and comedy by blurring the line between sanity and insanity and using madness as a political metaphor. Tennessee Williams updates Ibsen by treating insanity as a subject in its own right, enhanced by incidents from his sister’s history of mental illness. In Soyinka, the personal and the social are interwoven, so that individual madness becomes a response to social crises. Finally, Sarah Kane, who committed suicide in a mental hospital at 28, wrote bleak testimonies of her own battle with madness, staging embodied but nameless voices with all the auditory and verbal hallucinations of psychosis.

Grading will be based on class participation, oral reports, an exam, and a final paper or creative project.
Days: MO WE  12:00-01:20 PM

GEN&SEX (F18)120C  PRCTCE OF EMBODIMNTTHUMA, E.

Explores how science, medicine, and law have shaped the understanding of differentiated bodies; examines shifting norms and ideals about producing, shaping, adorning, and dressing gendered bodies across diverse historical, cultural, social, economic, and spatial contexts.
Days: T TH  05:00-06:20 AM

GEN&SEX (F18)157B  QUEER LIVES KNOWLEDSCHEPER, J.

How does the queer past shape the queer present and future? What are the historical links between slavery, Jim Crow segregation, colonialism, and the regulation of gender, sexuality, and desire? This course begins by examining the production of 19th century normative sexual and gender identities, bodies, practices, and communities through the surveillance of and cultural debates around those bodies that came to be designated as non-normative. In a historical epoch marked by changing discourses that linked sexual pathologization to scientific racism, slavery, and colonial spectacles of the body, new pseudo-scientific knowledge about non-normative gender and sexuality emerged. By the 20th century, mass media, popular culture, militarization of culture, and—by the turn to the new millennium—HIV/AIDS, played increasingly significant roles in shaping public discourses about transsexuality, homosexuality, and lesbianism. Students will explore how different ways of knowing, seeing, regulating, and inhabiting bodies and identities shape current debates. Focusing on “queer of color critique” and “black queer studies,” students will examine: 1) the uses of performance, film, and visual culture activism in producing queer politics from the era of the AIDS crisis in the 1980s and 90s to the present; 2) gay gentrification and tourism (and their global iterations as homonationalism, pinkwashing, and Islamophobia); 3) contemporary contestations including the undocuqueer movement, queer disability activism, the banning of the film Inxeba (2018) and Jordache A. Ellapen’s Queering the Archive: Brown Bodies in Ecstasy (2018). Students will explore how "queer" and "trans" histories inform contemporary queer politics, art, culture, and activism by developing their own creative strategies for “queering the archive.”
Days: TU TH  12:30-01:50 PM

PHILOS (F18)131C  MEDICAL ETHICSSTAFF

Analysis of moral issues concerning health care. Topics may include: just allocation of scarce medical resources, the doctor/patient relationship, genetic engineering, surrogate motherhood, abortion, euthanasia, or social policy concerning AIDS.

Days: TU TH  03:30-04:50 PM

PHILOS (F18)140  PHILOS OF MEDICINEROSS, L.

Visit the Logic and Philosophy of Science website for more information.
Days: TU TH  12:30-01:50 PM

Courses Offered by Med Humanities or other Schools at UCI

Fall Quarter (F18)

Dept Course No., Title   Instructor
MED HUM (F18)1  HLTH WELLNESS BODYIMADA, A.

Asks what is health and who gets to have it? What is considered a “healthy” or “sick” body? We analyze historical and contemporary experiences of illness, medicine, and caregiving, including how patients represent their bodies and healing.

(GE III or IV ).
Days: TU TH  09:30-10:50 AM

MED HUM (F18)120A  (PSYCH) ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGYLEWIS, J.

Introduction to psychopathology and behavioral deviations, and the concepts of theories regarding these conditions.
Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or (PSYCH 9C or PSY BEH 11C).

Overlaps with PSY BEH 102C.

Restriction: Psychology and Cognitive Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

MED HUM (F18)124V  (PSYCH) PSYCH OF VIOLENCELEWIS, J.

Introduction to psychopathology and behavioral deviations, and the concepts of theories regarding these conditions.
Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or (PSYCH 9C or PSY BEH 11C).

Overlaps with PSY BEH 102C.

Restriction: Psychology and Cognitive Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO (F18)134A  MEDICAL ANTHROSTAFF

Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world.

Same as CHC/LAT 178A.

(VIII)

ANTHRO (F18)134F  ANTHRO OF THE BODYSTAFF

Examines human bodies as both biological and...

CHC/LAT (F18)178A  MEDICAL ANTHROSTAFF

Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world.

Same as ANTHRO 134A.

(VIII)

INTL ST (F18)122  NUCLEAR ENVIRONMENTWHITELEY, J.

Understanding the impact of the nuclear age on the environment and human health through interrelated developments of nuclear power and nuclear weapons. The early years of weapon development, catastrophic environmental pollution, perils of nuclear power in the U.S. and Russia.

Same as SOCECOL E127, PUBHLTH 168.

SOC SCI (F18)154  MEDICAL SOCIOLOGYBUHER-KANE, J.

Current problems in U.S. health-care system and proposals for reform. Examines financial barriers to access; problem of patient dumping; underinsurance; prenatal and perinatal care; child services; preventative care and needs of the elderly; minorities; low-income people; undocumented.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Sociology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.