Cross Listed GMES Course Descriptions within Humanities

Term:

Winter Quarter (W18)

Dept/Description Course No., Title  Instructor
HISTORY (W18)132D  ARMENIANS ANC/EARLYBERBERIAN, H.

This course surveys the history of Armenia and Armenians from ethnogenesis to the early modern period at the end of the 1700s within a regional and global context that takes into account interactions and encounters with the empires and peoples that encompassed their orbit. Itproceeds in chronological order but with a strong thematic approach from ethnogenesis through dynastic rule, relations with Iranian, Byzantine/Roman, Arab states and cultures, and the last Armenian kingdom to the rise and collapse of an Armenian kingdom in Cilicia, imperial rule under the Ottomans and Safavids, and ends with important developments in the early modern period from “trade diaspora” (specifically New Julfan) to print culture and national revival.
Days: MO WE  12:00-01:20 PM

Courses Offered by Global Middle East Studies or other Schools at UCI

Winter Quarter (W18)

Dept Course No., Title   Instructor
GLBL ME (W18)60B  SOCSCI PROB&METHODSLE VINE, M.

This course focuses on the social sciences as they relate to studies of the Middle East. 
Days: TU TH  09:30-10:50 AM

ANTHRO (W18)169  EGYPTOMANIASTRAUGHN, I.

The culture of ancient Egypt, everything from its mythology and ritual practice to its monuments and every day artifacts, has captured the imagination of the various civilizations that followed and came in contact with the land of the Nile. Long before Europeans descended upon the sands of Egypt to hunt for its treasures and give rise to their academic study, the Pharaohs and their mark on the landscape intrigued Greeks, Romans, Byzantines, Arabs and countless others. This course examines this fascination with all things Egypt and how it has become transformed into both a field of study – Egyptology – and as a scientific, commercial, artistic and even spiritual passion. From archaeologists who toil to unearth the next great tomb, to purveyors of contemporary popular culture that seek to exploit the pyramids and their mysteries for commercial success, this course explores how the Egyptian past has shaped our perception of Egypt today as well as defining ourselves as consumers of its strangeness. What explains ancient Egypt’s hold on the imagination over so many millennia?: The place it holds in the scriptures of the monotheistic faiths of Judaism, Christianity and Islam? The lure of an almighty God-ruler? Its cult of death and the afterworld? The challenge of unlocking the secrets of hieroglyphics and its material culture? Or, more simply, its geography of the fertile Nile valley snaking its way amongst a vast sea of seemingly barren sands? Egyptomania brings together a set of rich cultural phenomena linking past and present, east and west. Nevertheless, the impact of such attention on the peoples who now inhabit that land has been both positive and negative. This course will also consider how Egyptians themselves have reconciled and engaged with their past, and how they lay claim to its legacy (or not) in the face of so much outside attention.
Days: M W F  10:00-10:50 AM

ANTHRO (W18)169  CULTURES OF THE MIDDLE EASTSTRAUGHN, I.

This course offers a survey of the diverse cultures of the contemporary Middle East through the lens of anthropology. Through issues such as urbanism, health, revolution, gender and the media students explore the ways in which the peoples of the region articulate their identities and challenge the, often negative, portrayals of their social practices.

It has become almost cliché to argue that image the Middle East in the US and other parts of the world lacks nuance and objectivity. While this is not a new phenomenon since the US declared its “war on terrorism” after 9/11, the intensity of such representations demands increased scrutiny. This course examines the work of anthropologists in producing knowledge about the Middle East within the context of other projects that construct narratives about the region and its people.  We will explore the diversity of cultures that constitute the modern Middle East and how their differences produce a rich tapestry of ideas, practices and engagements with issues such as the media, gender and the body, revolution, youth, and modernity. Is anthropology able to channel the voices of those informants in ways that provide us with both a sense of authenticity and objectivity in the ethnographic portrayal of the Middle East?
Days: M W  07:00-08:20 PM

INTL ST (W18)165  MIDEAST POLITICSPETROVIC, B.

No description is currently available.
Days: T TH  02:00-03:20 PM

INTL ST (W18)179  TURKEY: RISING SOFT POWERCEVIK, S.

No description is currently available.
Days: T TH  12:30-01:50 PM

INTL ST (W18)179  MODERN IRANIAN HISTORY & POLITICSAMIRKHIZI, M.

No description is currently available.
Days: T TH  09:30-10:50 AM

INTL ST (W18)179  ISLAM & THE WESTPETROVIC, B.

No description is currently available.
Days: T TH  03:30-04:50 PM