Course Descriptions

Term:

Inter Area Studies

Winter Quarter (W18)

Dept/Description Course No., Title  Instructor
COM LIT (W18)102W  ECOPOLITICSSCHWAB, G.
Emphasis/Category: Inter-Area Studies

In this course we will study the entanglement of two of the gravest dangers humanity faces today, namely nuclear politics and environmental violence.  The course will be divided into two sections: 1. Nuclear Politics; 2. Ecological  Violence, Resource Depletion and Climate Change.  Drawing on Gregory Bateson’s “ecology of mind,” we will open with questions regarding the production of ecological knowledge and consciousness.  We then move to the legacy of Hiroshima and nuclear politics.  In this section, we will discuss nuclear colonialism, critical nuclear race theory and the gendering of nuclear politics, nuclear war and transgenerational nuclear trauma, nuclear energy, nuclear accidents and nuclear waste.  In the second section, we will discuss the anthropocene, slow ecological violence, climate change and the extinction of species and planetary life as well as a possible politics of resistance and ethics of trans-species care.

Days: MO WE  03:00-04:20 PM

COM LIT (W18)105  EARLY AMERICAN AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURECHANDLER, N.
Emphasis/Category: Locating Africas, Inter-Area Studies

This course will introduce students to the history of the African American intellectual and literary construction of the American experience, focusing on the 18th and 19th centuries – highlighting its early emergence, intensity and breadth – the colonial period through the advent of the Twentieth century. The will focus will be on Phillis Wheatley, Oluadah Equiano, Ottobah Cugoano, David Walker, Maria Stewart, and Frederick Douglass. W. E. B. Du Bois’s reflections on African American intellectual traditions will be of basic reference. In addition to established and recognized literary and intellectual texts, the readings and lectures also include, or consider, inscribed oral texts such as orations and public addresses, sermons, testimonials, songs, especially spirituals, and folklore. Other readings referenced or discussed in the class include published poetry, essays, petitions, legal appeals and declarations, editorials, slave narratives and other autobiographical narratives, fiction, and histories. The student who completes this course will have an understanding of the African American intellectual and literary construction of the American experience and thus the emergence of a modern literature and intellectual tradition, noting its early announcement within the history of the United States and a profound sense of its intensity and breadth.
Days: TU TH  12:30-01:50 PM

EURO ST (W18)101B  FRENCH REV GLOBALCOLLER, I.
Emphasis/Category: Inter-Area Studies

The 1790s was a time of huge change and disturbance in the world. War, revolution, terror were in the air, and took on new meanings. This wave of change was on a global scale, but like an earthquake, it struck most intensely at certain points. France was the epicentre of revolution. On 14 July 1789, the people of Paris scaled the huge stone walls of the Bastille and seized the royal fortress. Within five years they would transform France, overthrow the monarchy, and set off echoes that changed the world.

This course will explore how the events, ideas and symbols of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Era were experienced in France and across the world. We will also look at the way the world shaped the French Revolution. We will think about Europe, the newly formed United States, Haiti, Egypt, Latin America, Africa, Asia and the Pacific. We will investigate the ways in which this global experience is represented in online sources, and find ways to undertake our own research and integrate it into the sum of available knowledge.

Days: MO WE  01:00-01:50 PM

FLM&MDA (W18)110  FILM & MEDIA THEORYMIMURA, G.
Emphasis/Category: Inter-Area Studies

This seminar will examine the nature and theory of political cinema, with particular emphasis on Third Cinema––an international leftist movement radical in its politics and approach to film, emerging in the 1960s in the wake of decolonial and anti-imperialist movements in Latin America, Africa and Asia. Third Cinema synthesized Marxist theory and film practice into a cultural-political praxis committed to advancing the interests of the ‘non-aligned’ Third World. By the late 1960s, it had inspired the development of ‘guerilla filmmaking’ among New Left and minoritarian constituencies in the First World. How did Third Cinema––and political cinema generally––reframe intellectual debates over art, politics and entertainment? How did it engage questions of gender, sexuality, and race; of nationalism, diaspora, and identity? We will approach such topics comparatively, and seek to grasp film as a political object and practice as it has been taken up in multiple geopolitical and historical contexts. The prerequisites for this course are FLM&MDA 85A-B-C and one course from the FLM&MDA 101 series.
Days: MO WE  10:30-11:50 AM

HISTORY (W18)100W  MAPS AND CULTURESEED, P.
Emphasis/Category: Inter-Area Studies

In this course, students will attain basic writing skills and learn digital tools for editing and writing through an introduction to the history of cartography.
Days: MO  04:00-06:50 PM

REL STD (W18)100  HISTORY OF THE DEVILMCKENNA, J.
Emphasis/Category: Inter-Area Studies

This course offers the history of an idea and a history of the effects of that idea. Students learn how numerous ancient mythological 'evil entities' in various world cultures contributed to the devil idea. Students then trace the development of devil traditions in ancient Zoroastrian, Jewish, Christian, and Islamic texts and contexts. Students then learn of the deadly effects of the devil idea: the devil idea fed centuries-long European anti-Jewish sentiment; it aided in the persecution and killing of European heretics; it was a major factor in a 300-year-long European satanic panic called the witchcraze, which executed some 100,000 'witches'. Next, students examine the uses of the devil in medieval European folklore and modern Western literature. Students then review a 1500-year history of devil iconography in Western art and a 100+ year history of the devil in Western films. Lastly, students survey the relation of the devil idea to very recent sociological phenomena like black metal music, satanism, satanic ritual abuse, and modern witchcraft. Along with lectures, there will be weekly readings (book chapters and/or handouts), weekly writing (short reviews of the reading), and weekly full-class discussions. Since the class meets once a week, any absence has a very ill effect on grades. One final exam (comprehensive). By the way: the class is not an examination of---or a promotion of---the occult.
Days: W  03:00-05:50 PM

Courses Offered by Global Cultures or other Schools at UCI

Inter Area Studies

Winter Quarter (W18)

Dept Course No., Title   Instructor
GLBLCLT (W18)105  LANGUAGE ORIGINSSCHWEGLER, A.

Emphasis/Category: Hispanic, US Latino/a and Luso-Brazilian Cultures, Locating Europes and European Colonies, Pacific Rim, Inter-Area Studies, Locating Asias (Nation, Culture, and Diaspora), Atlantic Rim, Locating Africas, Global Middle East
No description is currently available.

INTL ST (W18)111C  GLBL ECON & SECURITYSTAFF

Emphasis/Category: Inter-Area Studies
No description is currently available.

INTL ST (W18)114A  INTL POL ECONOMYBACH,S.

Emphasis/Category: Inter-Area Studies
No description is currently available.

INTL ST (W18)117A  TRANSNATL MIGRATIONCHAVEZ, L.

Emphasis/Category: Inter-Area Studies
No description is currently available.