"Religion and the Study of Human Biodiversity"

Department: Humanities Commons

Date and Time: October 18, 2017 | 2:30 PM-4:00 PM

Event Location: Humanities Gateway 1341

Event Details


The workshop in Science, Technology and Race (STaR) invites you to a seminar with Professor Terence Keel, UC Santa Barbara, presented via remote conference technology.

Terence Keel is an Associate Professor of History and Black Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and currently the Vice Chair of the History Department. Keel has written widely about the history of racism and its connections to the modern biological sciences, religious intellectual history, law, medicine, and public health. He is the author of Divine Variations (Stanford University Press 2018). The book offers a new account of the development of scientific ideas about race. Focusing on the production of scientific knowledge over the last three centuries, Keel uncovers the persistent links between pre-modern Christian thought and contemporary scientific perceptions of human difference. He argues that, instead of a rupture between religion and modern biology on the question of human origins, modern scientific theories of race are, in fact, an extension of Christian intellectual history.

This workshop session is presented in conjunction with two seminars being offered for the Autumn 2017 term: “Science, Gender, Empire and Race” within the Department of History and “The Concept of Race” within the Department of African American Studies.

The Workshop on Science, Technology, and Race (STAR), is a Program of the UC Consortium for Black Studies in California, at UC Irvine, with support from the Humanities Commons of the Office of the Dean, School of Humanities – at UC Irvine.

All are welcome.

Light Refreshments will be available at the event.

For project information, contact STAR Faculty Director Kavita Philip: kphilip@uci.edu

For more on the Consortium Workshops at UCI contact: blackthought@uci.edu.

For access, contact Angelica Enriquez, enriquea@uci.edu, at the Humanities Commons.

http://www.humanities.uci.edu/commons/