Course Descriptions

Term:  

Winter Quarter

Dept Course No and Title Instructor
ART HIS (W18)40B  EUROPE:MEDIEVL &RENPOWELL, A.
AH 40B (Western Art of the Middle Ages and Renaissance) focuses on the long period that extends from the end of the Western Roman Empire in the fifth century through the sixteenth century. There are no prerequisites for the course and no expectations that students will necessarily have taken Art History 40A. Less a survey than a series of case studies, this course looks at colossal statues of emperors, miracle working icons, gem encrusted reliquaries, Gothic cathedrals, the eye-tricking illusions of Renaissance painters, the first nude statues in the West since antiquity, Michelangelo’s paintings in the Sistine Chapel, and Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa. In looking at these things, we will trace the emergence of European visual culture, its dialogue with other cultures, the questioning of the nature and validity of representation within that culture — especially the representation of the human body — and the gradual eclipse of the sacred icon by the secular, modern work of art during the Renaissance.
ART HIS (W18)42B  ARTS OF CHINAWUE, R.
This course offers an introduction to art history through the art and visual culture of China from prehistoric times to the 20th century. We will examine how the religious, political, philosophical, and cultural traditions of China are expressed, created, and communicated by visual images and objects, proceeding chronologically and thematically.
ART HIS (W18)134C  IMPRSSNSM TO FAUVESHERBERT, J.
Paris, it is has been said, was the capital of the nineteenth century. Surely that claim stands true when it comes to painting. Over a handful of decades French painters produced some of the most stunning, complex, and beloved works in the history of art. We will attempt to grapple with the great richness of art in this period art by, paradoxically, focusing down on a mere handful canvases, paintings by the likes of Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Monet, and Seurat. In most cases, we will devote the full lecture period to a single work of art. This approach will allow us to view individual canvases from a wide variety of perspectives, placing paintings within their historical context, comparing them to other works, studying their formal properties, honing in on details with near-microscopic precision. In similar spirit, for your assignments you will select a single painting from the Norton Simon or the Getty, conduct a deep and varied analysis of your own, and then report on your findings in an oral presentation, a written essay, and an exhibition design or website.
ART HIS (W18)140B  JUNK ARTNISBET, J.
For the last hundred years, visual art has taken on a junkyard imaginary—turning to things used, discarded, and even grimy, contaminated, and polluted. This course will examine the development of this approach to art and criticism. Beginning with techniques of repurposing in European Modern Art, we will open with cubist collage, surrealist visits to the flea markets of Paris, and Duchamp’s invention of the readymade. These set the stage for a return to the scrapheap at midcentury with the torn signage of Nouveau Réalisme and piles of discarded consumer objects in Assemblage. An important aspect of Junk Art is also the move of art production beyond the studio, and the course will conclude with the local example of the Watts Towers and examples of contemporary art’s concerns for resource management and ecological recuperation. Throughout, emphasis will be placed on the changing relationship of art and consumption in late modernity.
ART HIS (W18)145B  MOD ARCH 1945-2000DIMENDBERG, E.
This course will introduce principal developments in architecture and urbanism since the end of Second World War.  It will focus upon the vicissitudes and global diffusion of western modernism, the development of the metropolis and megalopolis, the emergence of postmodernist and critical regionalist traditions, the quest for sustainability, and the imbrication of the built environment in the political, social, and cultural changes accompanying the coldwar, the civil rights and anti-war movements, the counterculture, and decolonization.  Architects to be studied include Mies van der Rohe, Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Kahn, Walter Gropius, Oscar Niemeyer, Robert Venturi, Denise Scott-Brown, Gunther Behnisch, Alvar Aalto, Alison and Peter Smithson, Archigram, Superstudio, Frei Otto, Alvaro Siza, Gunnar Asplund, Jorn Utzon, Frank Gehry, Carlo Scarpa, Buckminster Fuller, Clorindo Testa, Lina Bo Bardi, Charles and Ray Eames, Richard Rogers, Renzo Piano, Richard Meier, Aldo Van Eyck, Peter Eisenman, Bruce Goff, Paul Rudolph, Norman Foster, Tadao Ando, Charles Correa, Arthur Erickson, Paolo Solieri, Constant, Robert Moses, Jean Nouvel, James Stirling, Charles Moore, Kenzo Tange, Steven Holl, Herzog and de Meuron, Peter Zumthor, Arata Isozaki, Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, and Enrique Norton.  The course will include one guest lecture and an optional film screening and field trip. Assignment structure: Take-home midterm and final research paper.  Instructor: Edward Dimendberg.
ART HIS (W18)162C  CONTEMPORARY JAPANWINTHER, D.
World art has been greatly impacted by all kinds of Japanese contributions in recent decades.  We will explore Japanese ceramics, comics, painting, and photography. You will learn about Japanese artistic responses to WWII, the revival of traditional arts, avant-garde groups,  and popular culture. Topics range from Department Store Art and Cute Style to and Pet Architecture and Nirvana art.  Three frameworks of study are used: individual artists’ careers, historical movements or groups, and social systems or institutions of art.  No prerequisites.
ART HIS (W18)164B  CONTEMP AFAM ARTCOOKS CUMBO, B.
This course is the second part of a two-part investigation of the history and aesthetics of African American art with a particular focus on the politics of representation. Beginning chronologically with government sponsored artworks in the 1930s and ending with contemporary art of the twenty-first century, students will study artworks created by African Americans. Explores art in a variety of media including painting, sculpture, photography, installation, and new media. Issues of cultural politics, appropriation, identity, gender, sexuality, hybridity and civil rights are discussed. Course readings and class discussions are the primary means of investigating the topics discussed.
ART HIS (W18)165B  19TH CENT AMER ARTWHITING, C.
Spanning the period from the beginning of the Civil War until the end of the nineteenth century, this course covers artists such as Winslow Homer, who were closely associated with certain regions of the United States, and artists such as Mary Cassatt, who spent most of their careers abroad. We consider how artists were educated in the United States, why they traveled to Europe and/or chose to live permanently abroad, and how some of them became public celebrities.  At the same time we will consider patrons of the arts, including those who collected art and those who helped establish the first art museums in the United States. The emergence of art museums, galleries, auction houses, and critics, and their conflicting commercial and educational goals will also be discussed.
ART HIS (W18)190W  ART HISTORY METHODSWUE, R.
This seminar offers an overview of major approaches and methodologies in art history; it is also a writing-intensive course that seeks to improve students’ writing skills as they relate to analyzing and researching visual works of art.
ART HIS (W18)198  PICTURING THE WINDPOWELL, A.
AH 198 (Picturing the Wind): on images of the wind, air, breeze, breath, spirit, soul, and so on from the renaissance to the present. For the most part invisible, air is one of the hardest and yet most alluring things to picture. We will look at its positive associations with life, movement, and the animation of static images as well as at its negative associations with insanity, contagious disease, and pollution. Finally, we'll ask what has made a subject that is so hard to picture so enduring in the visual arts.
ART HIS (W18)198  MAP & LANDSCAPEHERBERT, J.
Maps and landscape paintings alike strive to capture of sense of the open spaces in which we live. Yet the two genres rely on markedly different pictorial modes to accomplish that task, beginning from the tendency for the former to view the world from an omniscient and omnipresent position hovering above the landscape and the latter to capture the standpoint of an individual human spectator. This seminar will consider a set of images and readings that allow us to think about how each pictorial mode operates, and how they interact with one another. Students will write one short paper analyzing a map or cityscape from UCI's own Arader collection, and complete a final project in which they represent some locale, real or fictive, through a combination of maps, visual prospects, and the written word.
ART HIS (W18)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYBETANCOURT, R.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W18)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYCOOKS CUMBO, B.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W18)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYGLEBOVA, A.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W18)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYHERBERT, J.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W18)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYMILES, M.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W18)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYMASSEY, L.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W18)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYNISBET, J.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W18)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYPATEL, A.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W18)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYPOWELL, A.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W18)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYWHITING, C.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W18)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYWINTHER, D.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W18)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYWUE, R.
No detailed description available.

For the most up-to-date information, check the Schedule of Classes.